Tag Archives: Region 2

With lane splits, closures, Utah drivers need to plan ahead

Lane splits at the Point of the Mountain, lane closures in Davis County may delay drivers  

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) advises drivers to plan ahead for travel delays on I-15 in Davis and Utah counties beginning as early as Saturday night. Crews will install a new lane split at the Point of the Mountain, and close lanes on I-15 in Davis County to allow concrete to cure.

The following is a brief description of road construction projects that drivers should be aware of this weekend (all schedules subject to change due to weather or equipment issues):

I-15 at the Point of the Mountain

A new lane split is scheduled to be in place on northbound I-15 at the Point of the Mountain starting as early as Sunday morning. The split will divide the northbound lanes into two sections while crews reconstruct the center lanes of the freeway. As part of this split, the two outside lanes will be shifted onto the new permanent pavement for the first time.

All four lanes will continue north on I-15 – however, drivers planning to exit at 14600 South will need to stay right. The lane split will allow UDOT to keep all four lanes open through construction along this busy section of I-15.

Once this split is in place, all four lanes will be reopened at S.R. 92 (currently, one northbound lane is closed at the interchange). To better control traffic merging onto I-15, the ramp meter for the northbound S.R. 92 on-ramp to I-15 will be turned on.

The lane split will work much like it does in Davis County, as shown in the video below.

 

I-15 in Davis County

Southbound I-15 is scheduled to be restricted to three lanes near 400 North in Bountiful for barrier work. Beginning as early as Friday, June 26, at 4 p.m., crews will close the right lane of southbound I-15. This restriction is scheduled to remain in place through Saturday, June 27, at 4 p.m. to allow the concrete to cure.

Northbound I-15 is scheduled to be restricted to three lanes near 2600 South in Bountiful this weekend. Beginning as early as Saturday, June 27, at 6 p.m., crews will close one northbound lane for bridge work. This restriction is scheduled to remain in place through Monday, June 29, at 6 a.m. Drivers should plan ahead for minor delays during this time, and consider using alternate routes such as Legacy Parkway.

Construction schedules are weather-dependent and subject to change. For more information about these and other UDOT projects, visit udottraffic.utah.gov or download the UDOT Traffic app, available for iOS or Android devices.

Use Click ‘N Fix to help Utah water quality

We’re interested in hearing from you on UDOT Click ‘n Fix — but not just about potholes and traffic signals. We also want your help stopping water pollution. That’s right, water pollution. I was surprised when I first heard about this too! Besides having miles and miles of highways to monitor, we also have acres and acres of right-of-way, and we want to make sure any bodies of water downstream, or near these areas, remain clean and pollutant-free.

Here’s where you come in: If you see any spills or illicit discharges on a UDOT maintained route, open the Click ‘n Fix app, answer a few questions and we’ll have our risk management division investigate.

Big Cottonwood Creek flows right next to S.R. 190 and the UDOT right-of-way. Please let us know if you see any spills or pollutants making their way into our waterways by using UDOT Click ‘n Fix. Not only in obvious places like Big Cottonwood Canyon, but also in populated areas where storm drains eventually empty into water as well.

Big Cottonwood Creek flows right next to S.R. 190 and the UDOT right-of-way. Please let us know if you see any spills or pollutants making their way into our waterways by using UDOT Click ‘n Fix. Not only in obvious places like Big Cottonwood Canyon, but also in populated areas where storm drains eventually empty into water.

So, what are spills and illicit discharges?

Spills are when something other than storm water unintentionally “spills” on the highway or right-of-way. For example, after a car crash, a vehicle may leak oil or antifreeze onto the highway. It needs to be properly cleaned up and disposed of to keep the pollutants out of the storm drain or an adjacent stream, river, lake or wetland.

Illicit discharges may also be unintentional or they may be illegal dumping activities. Some examples of illicit discharges are sprinkler runoff that contains pesticides, fertilizers or weed killers; detergents, oil and grease from washing a car; or someone dumping waste into a storm drain. We also want to know if someone is connecting a pipe or ditch to UDOT’s property or drainage system.

The UDOT Click ‘n Fix app is available on Google Play or iTunes and on our website. Please keep in mind that if you witness something that is endangering public safety, please call 911. This not only applies to spills and pollutant discharges, but also our other Click ‘n Fix issues like road debris.

With your help, we hope to keep pollutants from entering storm drains and making it into Utah’s streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands. Utah is such a beautiful state, and water is so precious that you can count us in for doing everything we can to keep it pristine.

 

Delay data to help drivers “Rethink Your Commute”

DRAPER — As part of UDOT’s ongoing efforts to minimize the inconvenience of construction, the Traffic Operations Center (TOC) is posting a new set of travel data on the overhead variable message signs (VMS).

Starting today, commuters traveling on I-15 through The Point project at the Point of the Mountain will be able to see the difference in delay for the time of day that they are on the road, compared to earlier or later.

The Variable Message Sign on SB I-15 near 8200 South educates motorists on the best times to commute around The Point.

The Variable Message Sign on SB I-15 near 8200 South educates motorists on the best times to commute around The Point.

For example, a driver traveling from I-215 to Lehi Main Street at 5:15 p.m. would have to deal with average delays of nearly 25 minutes. But if that same driver traveled an hour earlier, she would only be delayed about 13 minutes.

A person could also reduce delays by driving later. Taking the same route, a driver could save ten minutes by traveling at 6:30 p.m. instead of 5:30.

Those ten minutes could be spent wrapping up a project at work, or watching the first inning of your kid’s baseball game – rather than stuck in traffic.

In addition to shifting your travel times, there are several other ways you can rethink your commute to avoid getting stuck in construction traffic. Consider TravelWise strategies like taking public transit, telecommuting or carpooling. Learn more at udot.utah.gov/rethink.

Data shows delay times can be decreased significantly by rethinking when you're on the road.

Data shows delay times can be decreased significantly by rethinking when you’re on the road.

This post was written by Christina Davis, Communications Manager on The Point project. 

Plan ahead for delays in Davis County

Lane restrictions, freeway closure scheduled for new bridge construction and concrete maintenance

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) advises drivers to plan ahead for delays on I-15 in Davis County this weekend. Crews are scheduled to set beams on the new 400 North bridge in Bountiful and complete concrete maintenance on the bridge over the railroad tracks on I-215 in North Salt Lake. Both projects will require significant lane restrictions.

The following is a brief description of road construction projects that drivers should be aware of this weekend (all schedules subject to change due to weather or equipment issues):

I-15 in Davis County

I-15 will be closed in both directions overnight Saturday, June 6, while crews build a new bridge at 400 North in Bountiful.

Southbound I-15 is scheduled to close at 500 West as early as 11 p.m. During this time northbound I-15 will remain open, but will be reduced to one lane. Once the new beams are set over the southbound lanes, crews will reopen one southbound lane and I-15 will be closed at 400 North. All lanes are schedule to reopen by 11 a.m. Sunday.

UDOT recommends Legacy Parkway as an alternate route. 400 North will remain closed at I-15 until project completion later this summer. The new bridge will feature improved sidewalks, wider shoulders and a higher barrier between traffic and pedestrians.

I-215 in North Salt Lake

Drivers should plan ahead for heavy delays near the I-215 ramps on I-15 in North Salt Lake. I-215 has been reduced to one lane in each direction while crews complete concrete maintenance on the bridge over the railroad tracks. This restriction will remain in place 24 hours per day for up to two months. UDOT recommends drivers use Legacy Parkway as an alternate.

Construction schedules are weather dependent and subject to change. For more information about these and other UDOT projects, visit udottraffic.utah.gov or download the UDOT Traffic app, available for iOS or Android devices.

 

UDOT informs Utah Transportation Commission of intent to raise speed limits in certain areas of I-80, I-70 and I-84

BRIGHAM CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) informed the Utah Transportation Commission of its decision to raise the speed limits on certain areas of rural Utah interstates today during the monthly Utah Transportation Commission Meeting, held in Brigham City Council chambers.

Traffic and Safety Director Robert Miles told the commission that the division has completed an analysis on speed, crash and fatal crash data.  The studies were conducted this spring, and determined that raising the speed limits in these areas would be safe and appropriate.

UDOT will increase the speed limit on stretches of Interstate 80 from 75 miles per hour to 80 mph from the I-84 Junction to the Wyoming border (MP 167.45 to 196.68).

A map of proposed changes for Interstate 80 speed limits

A map of proposed changes for Interstate 80 speed limits

Interstate 70 also has four sections of highway that will increase from 75 mph to 80 mph:

  • The I-15/I-70 Junction to just past Cove Fort (MP 5),
  • Just west of the US-89 Junction to Exit 63- Gooseberry Rd. (MP 21-63)
  • Exit 73 – Ranch Exit to Exit 138 – Brake Test Area (MP 73.9-138.7)
  • Exit 146 – Reef View Area to the Colorado border (MP 146-231).

 

A map of proposed speed limit changes for Interstate 70.

A map of proposed speed limit changes for Interstate 70.

 

On Interstate 84, three stretches of road will increase from 65-70 mph to 70 or 75 MPH:

  • I-15 to the mouth of the Canyon (MP 81-88) 70 mph
  • Between Ogden and Morgan (MP 92-106) 75 mph
  • Near Henifer to the I-80/84 Junction 75 mph
A map of proposed speed limit changes on Interstate 84.

A map of proposed speed limit changes on Interstate 84.

 

New Bangerter Bridge to open May 17

For motorists in the southwest part of the Salt Lake Valley, the long-awaited day is here: The Bangerter Bridge over Redwood Road will be opening to east-west traffic this Sunday afternoon, May 17.

Starting on Saturday at 11 p.m., traffic on Bangerter Highway will be reduced to one lane while crews switch the traffic onto the new bridge, so watch for changing traffic patterns that night. Motorists wanting to access Redwood Road from the highway (and vice versa) will continue to use the temporary road at Marketview Drive.

This graphic shows how traffic will be affected by the opening of the Bangerter bridge at Redwood Road.

This graphic shows how traffic will be affected by the opening of the Bangerter bridge at Redwood Road. Click on the image to increase its size.

City officials in the area will be taking a tour to see the new bridge on Friday, May 15th at 10 a.m.

The community surrounding Bangerter and Redwood Road is continuing to grow at an accelerated pace, and we’re excited about the improvements the project has made to the area. The project will accommodate immediate and long-term traffic demands and increase mobility, thanks to a grade separated single point urban interchange. The SPUI will improve safety for motorists and bikers in the area by reducing the amount of conflict points.

While the opening of the bridge, which is similar to the bridge at Bangerter and 7800 South in West Jordan, is a major milestone in the Redwood and Bangerter project, it is not the end.  Work on Redwood Road, and signing and landscaping the project, will push the actual construction end day to July.

Utah ranks in top 5 bicycle-friendly states

The League of American Bicyclists released its 2015 Bicycle Friendly State ranking, and the Beehive State comes in at number five.

Washington was ranked first for the eighth year in a row, followed by Minnesota, Delaware, Massachusetts, Utah, Oregon, Colorado, California, Wisconsin and Maryland in the top 10.

“We are very proud of the high quality of life enjoyed by Utahns,” said Utah Gov. Gary R. Herbert. “We have worked to support and provide world-class bicycling opportunities across our state, both for commuting to work and enjoying the natural beauty around us. As we meet the evolving demands of our state and plan for the future, amenities like this will help Utah continue to be one of the greatest places to live, work and play.”

Bikers ride along a trail in a past Road Respect tour.

Bikers ride along a trail in a past Road Respect tour.

At UDOT, Integrated Transportation is our top emphasis area. In all phases of a project, we consider the needs of bicyclists, pedestrians and other Active Transportation users.

On Utah’s scorecard, the state was given top scores on Policies and Programs, Education and Encouragement, Infrastructure and Funding, and Legislation and Enforcement.  When compared against the rest of the country in the various categories, Utah places near the top in just about every one.

Utah’s Collaborative Active Transportation Policy is a partnership between UDOT, Utah Transit Authority, Wasatch Front Regional Council, Mountainland Association of Governments and Salt Lake County to identify 25 focus areas statewide to connect bicycle networks together to increase non-vehicle mobility.

Some projects we’re particularly proud of include:

St. George’s Bluff Street at Red Hills Parkway interchange:  In an area that is historically significant for cycling events, recreational riding & training, and marathons is an intersection where a state highway through a natural preserve meets a city street. In this high-growth section of Utah’s Dixie, the city and state met together with the Southern Utah Bike Alliance to make center exit interchange. The interchange maintains a steady flow of traffic for motorists, safely connects runners and bikers to the trails in the region, and saved taxpayers $4 million by utilizing the natural topography of the area.

An aerial view of the new Bluff St/Red Hills Parkway Intersection.

An aerial view of the new Bluff St/Red Hills Parkway Intersection.

On SR-12, a Bike Path Extension is in its final phase of construction. The project will provide a safe alternative for bicyclist and pedestrian travel by distancing them from traffic. It will also provide a key link in the connectivity of this path from Red canyon to Bryce Canyon National Park. The project, which is a partnership with Garfield County using Transportation Alternatives Program funding, should be finished near the end of the 2015 construction season.

Salt Lake City’s Green Bike Program: This silver-level bicycle community has a Green Bike sharing program that gives a custom approach and bike lane design to fit existing streets. This includes shared lanes.

Jordan River Parkway is 40 miles of urban park that runs along the Jordan River. It stretches from the south end of Salt Lake Valley and connects north into the Legacy Parkway Trail in Davis County, giving tens of thousands of residents access to non-vehicular transportation and recreation.

The entire I-15 South Davis project improves active transportation in the area, especially at 500 South, 400 North, and Parrish Lane.

In Utah County, the Murdock Canal Trail is a multi-use trail that extends 16 miles through seven cities, from Lehi to Orem. It connects with numerous regional and city trails and will have future connections to seven additional trails. The plan for the area is to build a safer, more connected regional bicycle network. Future plans for this system, in conjunction with the Jordan River Parkway and Legacy Parkway Trails, will allow riders to travel from Ogden to Provo using only paved trails. You can view Region 3’s bike plan here.

Along the Wasatch Front, UDOT is continuing to install radar detection  at intersections that are frequently used by bicyclists and other recreationists.

We’re excited that the League of American Bicyclists has honored Utah with a top-5 bicycle-friendly distinction. While there’s still much work to be done to keep up with the state’s amazing rate of growth, we’re committed to exploring every avenue of possibility for active transportation. The creativity, enthusiasm and desire to collaborate with our partners is what drives innovation on Utah roads, and going forward, we’ll continue to strive to improve the quality of life for all Utahns.

 

 

Major Delays Expected on I-15 this Weekend in Davis, Utah Counties

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) advises drivers to plan ahead for significant traffic restrictions on I-15 in Davis and Utah counties beginning as early as Saturday night. Crews will be demolishing a bridge at 400 North in Bountiful, and completing concrete pavement maintenance in Springville. Additional restrictions are also scheduled to begin on I-80 in Summit County as early as Saturday morning.

The following is a brief description of road construction projects that drivers should be aware of this weekend (all schedules subject to change due to weather or equipment issues):

I-15 in Davis County

I-15 is scheduled to close in both directions on Saturday, April 18, as early as 11 p.m. while crews demolish a bridge at 400 North in Bountiful. The freeway will be closed at the following locations:

  • Southbound I-15 will be closed between the Legacy Parkway/Park Lane interchange in Farmington and 400 North in Bountiful, and all southbound traffic will be diverted to Legacy Parkway. The southbound I-15 on-ramps at all interchanges in this area will also be closed.
  • Northbound I-15 will be closed at 400 North (Exit 317) in Bountiful. Northbound traffic will be diverted onto 400 North, then back onto the freeway via 500 West.

The freeway is scheduled to reopen by Sunday, April 19, at 11 a.m. Drivers in both directions are advised to use Legacy Parkway as an alternate route.

View Alternate routes for this weekend, as Interstate 15 will be closed from Farmington to Bountiful.

View Alternate routes for this weekend, as Interstate 15 will be closed from Farmington to Bountiful.

I-15 in Utah County

Southbound I-15 is scheduled to be reduced to one lane between 1400 North (Exit 261) and 400 South (Exit 260) in Springville on Saturday, April 18, as early as 9 p.m. for concrete pavement maintenance. These restrictions are scheduled to remain in place through Monday, April 20, at 7 a.m., when an additional lane will reopen.

During this time, drivers should plan ahead for severe traffic delays of more than an hour on Sunday, April 19, between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. US-89 through Provo and Springville should be considered as an alternate route. In addition, UDOT recommends that drivers adjust their schedules to avoid travel on southbound I-15 during this time if possible.

Following these lane restrictions, the southbound lanes on I-15 in this area are scheduled to be split into two sections on Monday, April 20, as early as 12 p.m. This lane split is expected to remain in place through Thursday, April 23, at 5 a.m. to allow concrete pavement to cure. Drivers wanting to use exits 261 (1400 North) or 260 (400 South) in Springville will need to stay in the right lanes.

This work is being completed under warranty as part of the I-15 CORE project at no additional cost to taxpayers.

View alternate routes from Provo to Springville, as Interstate 15 will be closed for much of the weekend.

View alternate routes from Provo to Springville, as Interstate 15 will be closed for much of the weekend.

I-15 in Salt Lake County

Southbound I-15 is scheduled to be reduced to four lanes north of the 10600 South interchange beginning as early as Saturday, April 18, at 10 p.m. These restrictions are scheduled to remain in place through Sunday, April 19, at noon while crews complete concrete maintenance. This work is being completed at night to minimize traffic delays.

I-80 in Summit County

I-80 is scheduled to be reduced to one lane in each direction from the U.S. 40 interchange to Wanship as early as Saturday morning, April 18. All traffic will be shifted to the eastbound lanes, and the speed limit will be reduced to 45 miles per hour. In addition, the westbound on- and off-ramps at Exit 150 (Tollgate/Promontory) will both be closed. These restrictions are scheduled to remain in place through fall 2015.

Crews are completing the second phase of a project to reconstruct I-80 in this area with new concrete pavement. Last year, work was completed in the eastbound lanes, and this season crews are reconstructing the westbound lanes.

Construction schedules are weather-dependent and subject to change. For more information about these and other UDOT projects, visit udottraffic.utah.gov or download the UDOT Traffic app, available for iOS or Android devices.

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Mtn View Corridor team receives Silver Barrel for $500k recycling decision

Executive Director Carlos Braceras recently awarded the Mountain View Corridor project team, Cedar City and Granger-Hunter Improvement District with a Silver Barrel award for their partnering efforts in saving taxpayers $500,000. Award Recipients included:

  • Brad Paxman, Granger-Hunter Improvement District
  • Johnathon Stathis, Cedar City Water Dept.
  • Josh Vanjura – UDOT
  • Barney Mekkmellom, UDOT
  • Jessie Barton, MVC team member (Parsons Brinkerhoff)
  • Mayor Maile Wilson, Cedar City Mayor
  • Joe Kammerer, UDOT

MVC Silver Barrel

UDOT and Granger-Hunter Improvement District (GHID) worked together to relocate a 2 million gallon water tank to Cedar City that was moved to make way for the Mountain View Corridor (MVC). By recycling existing resources, UDOT, GHID and Cedar City saved taxpayers $500,000.

UDOT is currently preparing for the next phase of construction on the Mountain View Corridor from 5400 South to 4100 South in West Valley City. The project needed to relocate an older steel water tank near 4300 South. The water tank held 2 million gallons of water that proved to be too small for the growing area. UDOT and GHID worked together to build a new 4 million gallon concrete water tank and built it in the neighborhood adjacent to the future roadway.

Instead of disposing of the old water tank material, UDOT and GHD researched ways to re-use it. Cedar City was in need of a new water tank and contacted GHID. The water tank was dismantled and transported to its new location for reassembly.

This water tank in Cedar City was once in the Mountain View Corridor project path in Salt Lake County.

This water tank in Cedar City was once in the Mountain View Corridor project path in Salt Lake County.

“We are always looking for ways to create positive outcomes during the construction process,” said Joe Kammerer, MVC Project Director. “This is a great example of government and utility companies working together to save taxpayer money.”

Mountain View Corridor consists of two lanes open in each direction from 16000 South to 5400 South. MVC will eventually be a 35-mile freeway from I-80 in Salt Lake to Lehi Main Street.

If you would like to learn more about the Mountain View Corridor project, visit udot.utah.gov/mountainview. To learn more about Granger-Hunter Improvement District, visit http://www.ghid.org/. To learn more about Cedar City, visit http://www.cedarcity.org/.

This post was written by Crystal McMillan, associate account manager on the MVC project team. 

UDOT seeks public comment on Draft 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) has prepared the Draft 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRP), and is requesting public comment on it.

The State of Utah has a 30-year plan in urban and rural areas. The LRP is what guides transportation system improvements on State and Federal highways in rural Utah. The plan provides an assessment of future area transportation needs, along with future transportation investment recommendations. It is developed in accordance with federal regulations and updated every four years.

UDOT Urban Planning Manager Walter Steinvorth said public input is essential on the LRP.

“Not only does it build stronger bridges between the Department and rural Utah, but it also gives residents a chance to identify projects that are important to them that could possibly get overlooked.” Steinvorth said.

Not only is the LRP important for people who live in rural Utah, but it also important for the public who vacation in the area, and for those who transport goods in and through the state. While UDOT welcomes public comment from all citizens, Steinvorth stressed the great need for those in under-represented parts of the population to let the department know of their concerns.

“We collect an awful lot of data. That data and analysis doesn’t always give us the full picture,” Steinvorth said.  “We need our citizens and users to help us find what is important to them in their community.”

The Draft 2040 LRP will be available for review at http://udot.utah.gov/go/lrp from March 1, 2015, through April 30, 2015. Comments may be directed to planning@utah.gov or submitted through the comment application at the listed website.