Tag Archives: Region 2

Vision and Mission announced at UDOT Annual Conference

If all roads led to Rome at the height of the Roman Empire, all roads in Utah lead to elevated economic prosperity and a higher quality of life in our state today.

This theme was prevalent throughout the Utah Department of Transportation’s Annual Conference. UDOT announced a new vision, mission statement, logo, and changes to its strategic goals during the conference—all aimed at improving Utah and keeping people safe.

Carlos Braceras speaks during the 2014 UDOT Annual Conference

Carlos Braceras speaks during the 2014 UDOT Annual Conference

On Tuesday, Oct. 28, Executive Director Carlos Braceras announced UDOT’s vision is “Keeping Utah Moving.” This simple statement is a powerful reminder of the department’s purpose and the goal employees, consultants, and contractors should be working toward every day.

“With our growing population and changing demographics, we need to keep our state moving,” Braceras said. “Whether it’s building new roads, repairing old ones, taking phone calls or holding meetings, it’s all aimed at Keeping Utah Moving.”

Innovating transportation solutions to strengthen Utah’s economy and enhance quality of life. 

Braceras explained that the department has based its direction and performance for years on Strategic Goals (Preserve Infrastructure, Optimize Mobility, Zero Fatalities, Strengthen the Economy); however, until this year it hasn’t had a vision or a mission statement.

As Utah looks ahead to a rapidly growing population, expected to almost double in the next 35 years, the entire state must begin anticipating solutions for Utah’s infrastructure and economy. Change can either be a problem or an opportunity. Braceras argues that for Utah, it’s an opportunity to reinforce Utah’s position as one of the country’s best places to live.

“Quality of life is the essence of what makes living in Utah so attractive,” Braceras said. “I’ve made Utah home for 34 years because I can buy a house, get a job, and enjoy the outdoors I love. That, combined with the strong state economy, is what will keep me here the rest of my life.”

Braceras, who’s been a career-long champion of safety, also announced moving Zero Fatalities to the department’s top strategic goal, but with a twist.

“Nothing that we do is more important than safety. Zero is our number one goal. Zero fatalities. Zero crashes. Zero injuries,” Braceras said.

While UDOT will continue aggressively educating drivers on habits that will decrease the amount of fatalities on Utah’s roads, focus will also be on keeping everybody within UDOT safe as well. That goes for accountants as much as it does construction workers, he said.

Deputy Director Shane Marshall announced one final change to UDOT’s direction: the emphasis area of Operational Excellence has been eliminated, reducing the number of emphasis areas from six to five (Integrated Transportation, Collaboration, Education, Transparency, Quality).

UDOT logo

Marshall explained, “The motivating forces behind the emphasis areas of both Quality and Operational Excellence were very similar. Both areas focus on a value we all share very strongly: the desire to be good stewards of taxpayer money.

If you define part of our Quality emphasis area as “Continued Process Improvement,” then Operational Excellence can fit right into Quality.”

The updated vision, mission, emphasis areas, strategic goals and core values are available on UDOT’s new web app. This tool was unveiled at the UDOT Annual Conference, and Braceras explained there are plans to expand its functionality in the future.

For now, the web app is a helpful resource for reference as employees, consultants, contractors and partners work together in their efforts to Keep Utah Moving.

I-80 Silver Creek Reconstruction

Photo of concrete pavingDrivers traveling through Summit County on I-80 have become familiar with one of the Region’s largest construction projects: the concrete reconstruction of I-80 from the U.S. 40 junction (MP 148) to Wanship (MP 155). Work began in June and is scheduled to continue through November of 2015 (construction will be halted during the winter months between 2014 and 2015).

The project includes replacing the freeway’s asphalt with new concrete pavement. In many locations, the existing asphalt will be removed and the pavement will be completely reconstructed. The new concrete will help accommodate the heavy trucks that travel in both directions along this key freight corridor and will prolong the life of the roadway.

UDOT’s contractor, Geneva Rock, is constructing the road in two principal phases. Phase one – the current phase – has shifted all traffic to the westbound lanes, allowing crews to reconstruct the eastbound lanes. In November, once the eastbound lanes are complete, lane restrictions will be lifted and traffic will be returned to its normal configuration. In the spring, crews will shift all traffic into the newly reconstructed eastbound lanes and complete work in the westbound lanes.

Photo of concrete pavingAs part of the concrete reconstruction, a unique pavement base material is being used to provide strength and stability to the pavement. The material, called Cement-Treated Asphalt Base (CTAB), provides a strong and stable base for the concrete to ensure durability and longevity. The CTAB material is formed by pulverizing the existing asphalt and adding cement powder and water to make a low strength concrete.

Typically, concrete pavement is either overlaid over the existing asphalt (as with the concrete paving project on S.R. 201), or a thin layer of asphalt is applied to the existing pavement and then the concrete is overlaid. On this section of I-80, however, the existing pavement is deteriorating too quickly to provide a suitable base. Instead of overlaying an additional layer of asphalt, CTAB was selected because of its lower cost and better resistance to water damage. While concrete treated bases have been used for a long time, this is the first instance in Utah where a cement treated base uses 100 percent recycled asphalt.

The project team has been involved in an extensive stakeholder outreach and public information program. Key stakeholders, such as Summit County, local emergency services, and the communities of Tollgate and Promontory, have been kept informed and consulted throughout the project to minimize impacts wherever possible and coordinate essential information such as emergency plans.

Photo of concrete pavingUDOT and Geneva Rock have worked together to address stakeholder concerns and mitigate risks associated with this traffic configuration. Local emergency crews are allowed to access the work zone in the event that they are not able to travel through open traffic lanes in a timely manner. Tow trucks are on-call at both ends of the construction zone to reduce response times to incidents and keep traffic moving.

Due to the long-term closure of Tollgate’s eastbound on- and off-ramps, accommodations needed to be made to provide residents access to their community, especially in case of emergency. The project team worked with the neighboring Promontory development to allow Tollgate residents to use of Promontory’s private access roads in order to bypass I-80 as they travel to and from Park City.

UDOT, Geneva Rock, and the local stakeholders have established a good working relationship for this significant reconstruction – a project that will ensure this section of I-80 stays in good repair for years to come.

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Incident Management Team celebrates 20 years of service

If you’ve ever had a flat tire, run out of gas, or driven by a crash on Utah’s roadways, chances are you’ve seen the white Incident Management trucks loaded with orange traffic cones, their electronic signs on the top with vital information. An integral part of how the state deals with time-sapping events on our roadways, UDOT’s Incident Management Team has 15 teams on call statewide for just about anything that can happen.

But it wasn’t always that way: After 20 years, it’s time to celebrate the service of the unsung heroes of the IMT team.

Incident Management Team

IMT members Billy Frashure, Nick Jarrett, Mark Whittaker, Jeff Reynolds and Alan Peterson are some of the professionals keeping Utah drivers safe. Photo by Adan Carrillo

In 1994, UDOT started a courtesy patrol — two trucks assigned to help drivers in the Salt Lake Area. But time and demand have increased the IMT’s role. No longer is the team looked at as a courtesy — but a necessity — in keeping Utah freeways safe and traffic moving from Logan to St. George and everywhere in between.

Consider this: since 2004, the IMT has helped more than 120,000 motorists in the Beehive State. With these professionals specifically trained in clearing crashes off the road quickly and then staying on the scene, emergency personnel and the Highway Patrol can focus on what they do best while knowing IMT is protecting them on the road.

Another important stat: with each minute saved by clearing a crash, five minutes of delays are prevented. Clearing crashes also helps prevent secondary crashes.

“Think of how many drivers have been helped since 1994, how many injuries have been prevented, or lives saved?” said UDOT Executive Director Carlos Braceras during a celebration on Monday. “IMT is a critical piece to help us reach our goal of Zero Fatalities.”

Braceras went on to give all of us safety tips to help IMT and UDOT out with the goal of Zero Fatalities on Utah roads:

  • Don’t stop on the freeway unless it’s an emergency
  • If you ARE involved in an incident, stay in your car with your seat belt on.
  • Slow down and move over to the next lane if you see a vehicle on the side of the road — it’s the law to do so for emergency vehicles.
  • Make sure you have enough fuel to make your trip safely
  • Check your spare tire to see if it’s in working condition
  • Prepare for the worst weather by keeping a blanket, food and water in the car.
  • Leave a lot of distance between you and the car in front of you.
Five Incident Management Team Vehicles offered the media ride-alongs to give them a better idea of what it’s like to be an IMT professional. Photo by Adan Carrillo.

Five Incident Management Team Vehicles offered the media ride-alongs to give them a better idea of what it’s like to be an IMT professional. Photo by Adan Carrillo.

Marge Rasmussen Silver Barrel Award

Photo of various individuals from Region 2 and the TOC posing with Carlos and Marge.Marge is being nominated for the Silver Barrel award because of her dedication and her positive attitude. A lot of Marge’s work goes unnoticed when really, her decisions affect UDOT and the traveling public on a daily basis. Marge is always willing to help with any safety or traffic issue. When Marge helps with a project, she gets deeply involved and tries to understand the problem at the very root. This includes field visits to see the problem firsthand, where she will either put the maintenance station in contact with the right person, or she will follow-up personally to correct the issue. Marge has helped solve several problems, everything from mid-block pedestrian crossings to correct signing, to potentially dangerous roadway issues.

Some of Marge’s most recent and note-worthy projects include:

  • The coordination with Draper City on the re-striping of 700 East from 11400 South to 11800 South to include the extension of bike lanes.
  • Coordination with Park City and Summit County on sign and signal issues throughout the S.R. 224 / S.R. 248 corridor.
  • School zone safety project on 700 East.

Marge balances the work that has to be performed and the needs of the public, and is always very customer-oriented. Marge’s hard work has prevented many accidents and potentially saved many lives. The Department is lucky to have someone like Marge on the team!

This guest post was taken from the Silver Barrel nomination written by Danny Page and Jake Brown.

Silver Barrell Award Given for Flood Control Partnering

Photo of flooding along the shoulder and into one lane of of Bangerter HighwaySeveral individuals from Region Two and West Valley City’s Public Works group recently received a Silver Barrel award for partnering to control and resolve flooding on Bangerter Highway. On January 30th, a pool of water began to appear on the outside lanes of Bangerter, between 2400 South and 2700 South. The water started to encroach into the center lanes, damaging pavement and quickly becoming a safety hazard. Rex Black, who was working his first shift as the Station 224 supervisor, was quick to act, putting his years of working knowledge into effect. He and Area Supervisor, Kevon Ogden tried to identify the cause of the flooding, but it began to get dark, and the loss of daylight made it next to impossible to find the cause.

Although they had been plowing snow since 4 a.m. that morning, Mark Prows and Auston Bagley from Station 2427 showed up with their shed’s vactor to assist. They worked tirelessly that afternoon and all evening to keep the road clear of excess water, until approximately 8 p.m. when the vactor broke down. A second and third vactor were dropped off to keep the roads clear, but both were out of service by 3 a.m. despite the best efforts of the UDOT Mechanic crew.

The next morning, Sovann Ok, Region Two’s Hydraulics Engineer, left a family celebration to bring the drainage drawings to the crew and provide engineering assistance. They reviewed the drawings together, and Sovann climbed into several drainage ditches to find where there might be a blockage causing the flooding.

Photo of a UDOT truck, pump and maintenance work on Bangerter Highway working to remove flood waters from the highway.Rex requested the assistance of West Valley’s Public Works department, and Darin Burke, Fred Benson and Terry Wilks arrived with the city’s working vactor and their copy of the drainage drawings, and helped UDOT determine that the flooding was caused by a blocked drain in a detention pond nearly a mile downstream from where the flooding had occurred.

West Valley used their vactor to clean the drains, while UDOT crews worked with the backhoe to clean the outlet. One rental pump was used to move water from the road into a nearby field, while a second pump was used to pump water through the opening of the outlet to the detention pond to allow it to drain. By the afternoon, the road was able to be reopened just in time for the evening commute.

Additional measures were taken in order to prevent this scenario from happening again. Holes were drilled into the top of the catch basin to catch any overflowing from the pond in the future. By utilizing the resources around them, working around the clock and partnering with outside entities, these individuals kept the traveling public safe and on the go.

This guest post was taken from the Silver Barrel nomination that was submitted to the UDOT Administration Office.

Optimizing Mobility

As we continually look for ways to improve our processes with the ultimate goal of keeping drivers moving on Utah’s roads, UDOT has deployed a number of technological tools that align with our strategic direction to preserve infrastructure, optimize mobility, reach our goal of zero fatalities, and strengthen the economy. I wanted to particularly emphasize what we are currently doing as a department in regards to our goal of optimizing mobility, which, in our day and age, no longer only applies to people’s ability to keep moving but also to their ability to do things as they are moving (but not driving), via phone apps.

These UDOT phone apps are allowing citizens to perform a variety of tasks, like reporting road conditions directly to operators at the Traffic Operations Center (TOC), or finding out what kind of delays to expect due to construction projects, and receiving severe weather event warnings. In addition to this ever evolving field of mobile technology, we continue to rely on innovative projects based on traffic models and engineering to not only improve mobility, but also safety, which in turn helps us achieve our goal of Zero Fatalities. Last year, Region Two completed several projects that illustrate exactly how we continue to optimize mobility through road and signal technologies.

MOBILE TECHNOLOGY

UDOT Traffic

Screen shot of UDOT Traffic app
UDOT Traffic is the department’s portal for statewide traffic information and can be accessed through the UDOT Traffic website or via mobile application for iOS or Android devices. Citizens can use the site to view real-time traffic conditions, construction and emergency alerts, road weather forecasts, and current lane and ramp closures. New to the UDOT Traffic app is a map layer that displays designated bike routes across the state, and state roads with shoulders wider than four feet. The map also displays routes that are restricted to bicycles such as I-15 in the Salt Lake Valley.

UDOT continually upgrades the UDOT Traffic portal to make it even more useful for drivers and the public. This year, the Lane Closure tool will be used for all projects on interstates as well as major highways including Bangerter Highway, Legacy Parkway, S.R. 201, and U.S. 40.

Future updates will improve integration between construction projects and the Lane Closure tool, and will allow contractors and department employees to make changes to UDOT Traffic information using mobile devices.

Citizen Reporter

Screen shots of the citizen reporting app
UDOT Citizen Reporter is a mobile application that enlists volunteers to report on current weather conditions for specific roads across Utah. This app is designed to provide both TOC operators and travelers with more accurate and timely road, weather and travel impact information and forecasts.

To participate as citizen reporters, members of the public are required to take a short course (either online or in person), complete a quiz, and then submit a sign-up form. Once those steps are completed, the volunteer receives a login and password, and can then download the app and begin submitting reports.

Citizen reporters are able to confirm weather data received through other sources (Road Weather Information Systems, meteorological forecasts, etc.) and can provide data for roadways where RWIS systems or other information sources may not be available.

ROAD & SIGNAL TECHNOLOGY

Variable Speed Limit

Photo of Variable Speed Limit sign with a semi passing by on I-80 in Parley's Canyon

Variable Speed Limit sign on I-80 in Parley’s Canyon

In January 2014, 15 new variable speed limit (VSL) signs were activated along I-80 in Parleys Canyon. The new signs are controlled by the TOC to help maintain consistent traffic flows and assist drivers in adjusting speeds when necessary due to weather conditions.

The TOC monitors speed limits in the canyon. In the event of poor weather or low visibility, a traffic engineer reviews information, such as current road conditions, weather forecasts, snowfall rates, observed speeds, and reports from maintenance personnel. Based on this information, the engineer can make the decision to reduce the speed limit as needed. Speed limits typically range from 35 to 65 miles per hour depending on conditions.

The new VSL signs are the first of their kind in Utah. UDOT is also considering installing variable speed limit signs in other locations around the state, such as Provo Canyon and Sardine Canyon, based on the results of this project.

Bike Detection

Photo of open signal cabinet
Last year, Region Two and the TOC worked together to develop and install reliable bicycle detection at nine signalized intersections in Salt Lake City, along with new pavement markings to show bicyclists where to stop. Often, bicyclists stop at red lights, look to see if they feel it is safe to cross, and then proceed through the intersection without waiting for a green signal; these upgraded intersections help encourage cyclists to obey traffic signals.

Additionally, upgrading bicycle detection systems encourages cycling as a viable means of transportation. This helps improve air quality by reducing automobile emissions, and is an asset for local economic development since many companies have reported that Utah’s alternative transportation options (such as bicycling and mass transit) were a significant factor in their decision to come to the state.

Moving forward, the department is working with the bicycling community to identify additional high-priority intersections where this detection technology can be installed.

HAWK Crossings

Photo of HAWK signal with traffic flowing underneath

HAWK

HAWK (High Intensity Activated CrosswalK) crossings have been installed in a number of locations in Region Two where arterial streets intersect with minor streets. These crossings include pavement markings, signs, and red and yellow lights on an arm over the roadway.

When a pedestrian pushes the button to activate the signal, the lights over the roadway begin flashing yellow, alerting drivers to slow down. A solid red light then activates, along with a “walk” sign for the pedestrian. Once the “walk” phase is complete, the light flashes red, indicating to drivers to treat the intersection as a stop sign – they may proceed if the crosswalk is clear. When the lights are off, drivers are not required to stop at the crosswalk.

These signals are in use at several locations throughout the Region where large numbers of pedestrians cross major roadways. UDOT continues to evaluate other locations for these signals and will install them as needed.

Bangerter Highway & Redwood Road Project Underway

Google map view of the Redwood Road and Bangerter IntersectionAs part of a proactive effort to address the immediate and long-term traffic needs on Bangerter Highway, UDOT is constructing a grade-separated interchange at the Redwood Road intersection from spring 2014 to spring 2015. This project will significantly enhance the public’s overall driving experience at the intersection, allowing for increased mobility, improved safety and a smoother ride. The interchange will be similar to the one constructed in 2012 over 7800 South and Bangerter Highway.

UDOT Region Two completed an environmental study on the intersection last winter in order to determine the best concept to fit the area’s traffic needs. UDOT has also been actively working with Bluffdale and Riverton city leaders, residents, businesses and property owners, to explain the value of the project and prepare the community for the upcoming project. The project is expected to support development and economic growth in the area as one of UDOT’s top goals to strengthen the economy.

UDOT recently selected Wadsworth Brothers Constructors as the contractor on the project. Wadsworth Brothers offers an aggressive construction schedule and places high value on minimizing traffic impacts as much as possible. Whenever we embark on a new project, one of our main priorities is to get in and get out with as little inconvenience to the public as possible. At the same time, we also want to deliver a quality product to the community in order to make it worth their time and effort. I’m confident that Wadsworth Brothers will fulfill both of these goals.

Commuters can expect light construction activity in the spring with the main construction effort building momentum in mid-July. Crews will narrow lanes, implement traffic shifts and build a temporary lane to maintain traffic capacity while construction efforts are underway. Crews will also implement paving operations, utility relocations, and landscape and aesthetic improvements.

During construction, our public involvement team encourages the public to visit the project website for updates and information regarding anticipated impacts. The project has a dedicated website, email and hotline already active for questions, and has been regularly meeting with stakeholders to keep them informed. UDOT and Wadsworth Brothers will also be hosting a “Meet the Contractor” night to give community members an opportunity to learn more about the project and construction schedule.

This is a guest post written by UDOT Region 2 District Engineer Troy Peterson.

Ray Meldrum: Utilities Guru and Local Film Producer

Photo of cast members in costume standing along a railroad track with Ray in the middle.

Ray on location in the Heber Valley with the principle cast of Saints and Soldiers: Airborne Creed.

UDOT Region 2 Preconstruction’s Ray Meldrum, has an interesting hobby: he’s a producer of the locally made Word War II “Saints and Soldiers” films.

Ray became friends with Ryan Little, the director, in 1998 when he was a promising BYU film school student. For Ryan’s first short film, “The Last Good War”, Ray provided all the military uniforms, equipment, vehicles and weapons. This short film received an Emmy, as well as the Jimmy Stewart Award and the Heartland Film Best Picture Award. This success began the seed that spawned the Saints and Soldiers film series.

The first “Saints and Soldiers” movie was produced in 2003 and followed a group of American soldiers behind enemy lines who somehow managed to escape the Malmedey Massacre that occurred during The Battle of the Bulge in early 1945. For a locally produced film, it was very well done and was highly regarded by critics and audiences. Because of its success in the U.S, it was eventually distributed worldwide where it was also highly successful. At the time of its release in 2004 it outsold more copies in the UK than Steven Spielberg’s “Saving Private Ryan.”

Photo of a camera with Ray and other cast members in the background

Setting an outrigger camera off of an American general’s Jeep in Saints and Soldiers: The Void

The success of the original Saints and Soldiers movie and the continued interest in WWII films, eventually led to a second film in 2010 called, “Saints and Soldiers; Airborne Creed.” Airborne Creed followed a group of troopers from the 517th Parachute Infantry Regiment in, “Operation Torch”; the allied invasion of the south of France in August 1944. This film was also highly successful worldwide and gained the attention of entertainment investors.

On the heels of the second film’s success, a third movie was quickly funded. “Saints and Soldiers: The Void,” was filmed in September 2013 and January 2014, and is scheduled to have its theatrical release in August of this year. The film depicts the end of the war in Europe as the German forces are making a last ditch attempt to harass and defeat the American Army as it moves into Germany. This film follows two M-18 Hellcat tank crews that are sent on a fateful mission through the Harz Mountains of Germany, and are ambushed by three German Panzer tanks.

Photo of an M-18 tank with Roger sitting on top and Ray standing by the side.

Ray on set in Provo Canyon with tank operator Roger Condron and Annie, the M-18 Hellcat.

Ray has co-produced all three films, which means he has a wide variety of responsibilities including; Technical Advisor, Armorer, Vehicle Wrangler, Extra Coordinator, Costume/Set Designer (e.g., helmets, gear, tents, bayonets, blanks, props etc.).

Ray says he has always enjoyed reading American History, but his passion is WWII. “I am fascinated by the sacrifice of the people at this time and the accomplishments they achieved during a short period of time. They out produced every other nation on earth, defeated two great enemies in two theaters of war and on opposite sides of the globe. They demonstrate when a nation, team, or department is united and individuals are dedicated to a cause, it creates a practically unstoppable force.”

This guest post was originally written by Ray for his division’s newsletter but was edited slightly for broader use by Region 2 Project Management Specialist, Heather Barthold.

Access Management Rule Revision Committee Silver Barrel Award

Photo of award recipients standing as a group with Executive Director Carlos BracerasThe 2013 Access Management Rule Revision Steering Committee recently received a Silver Barrel Award. The committee assembled on short notice to completely revise and overhaul the Department’s aging Access Management Rule (Utah Administrative Code R930-6), the first comprehensive rewrite of this rule since the program’s inception in 2003.

Some of the major achievement highlights from this project include:

  • Reducing document size by 50% (from 100 to 50 pages)
  • Significantly reducing redundancies and conflicts
  • Clarifying procedures and requirements
  • Updating statutory references
  • Revising document organization
  • Converting to rule format
  • Creating a presentation version of rule

Members of the committee included:

  • Rhett Arnell – Region 4
  • Doug Basset – Region 3
  • Cali Bastow – Project Development
  • David Benard – Office of the Attorney General
  • Tim Boschert – Systems Planning and Programming
  • Mark Burns – Office of the Attorney General
  • Diego Carroll – Parsons Brinckerhoff
  • Paul Egbert – Region 1
  • Todd Finlinson – Region 1
  • Hugh Hadsock – FHWA
  • Griffin Harris – Region 3
  • Jason Henley – Project Development
  • Gaye Hettrick – Project Development
  • Amanda Kirkendall – Parsons Brinckerhoff
  • Tony Lau – Region 2
  • Richard Manser – Project Development
  • Rod McDaniels – Project Development
  • Lyle McMillian – Project Development
  • Teri Newell – Region 3
  • Randy Park – Project Development
  • Renee Spooner – Office of the Attorney General
  • Mark Velasquez – Region 2
  • Lisa Wilson – Project Development

 

Silver Barrel Awards for Maintenance Station 225

Photo of crew members from maintenance station 2425 receiving their Silver Barrel AwardsExecutive Director Carlos Braceras presented several Silver Barrel Awards to employees from Maintenance Station 225 – Salt Lake Metro. The first award was presented to Station Supervisor Jake Brown for his exemplary service assisting a community group in their neighborhood clean up of the 600 North overpass.

On Saturday, Nov. 9, the Capitol Hill Neighborhood Council and the Rose Park Community Council co-sponsored a clean up of the 600 North overpass. Several community residents and almost thirty West High School JROTC students attended the event. Anticipating that most of the students would not have tools or gloves for the clean up, the Capitol Hill Neighborhood Council asked UDOT for a little help. In response, Jake supplied brooms, shovels, rakes, gloves, vests and garbage bags to the group. The group was thrilled with the support and readily put everything to good use.

Photo of Carlos Braceras presenting maintenance station 2425 with Silver Barrel AwardsJake’s willingness to support his community is a key reason why he is so deserving of the Silver Barrel Award. As Capitol Hill Neighborhood Council Chair Richard Starley wrote, “We could not have done it without Jake’s support. We appreciate his willingness to help and follow through on our requests. . . . The overpass and I-15 interchange haven’t looked this clean since they were built.”

Members of Jake’s crew, Fred Baney, Mike Gailey, Robert Giolas, Brian Goins and Curtis Trott, were also presented a Silver Barrel for assisting the Salt Lake City Fire Department with containment of a semi fire on the northbound I-15 ramp to westbound I-80.

On the morning of December 5, 2013 the maintenance station was contacted at 3:20 a.m. to provide assistance with the fire fighting efforts. Due to the cold temperatures crew members were concerned about ice and responded with a plow truck and sander, a loader and a liquid brine truck with a hose attachment. Salt Lake City fire trucks began to run low on water so Photo of Carlos Braceras congratulating and thanking maintenance station 2425 crew membersUDOT crew members used the brine truck to help douse the flames. The loader was used to expose the burning cargo allowing fire crews put out hot spots.

Once the fire was out Jake and his crew cleaned up the debris, assisted the tow company with removing the semi and its cargo, salted and removed ice patches and had the ramp open for the morning commute. Congratulations to these very deserving individuals.

Co-authored by Region 2 Communications Manager Adan Carrillo. Thanks also goes to Adan for providing the photos.