Tag Archives: Region 2

Mountain View Corridor Project Update

Photo simulation of the future corridor between 5400 South and 4100 South.

Photo simulation of the future corridor between 5400 South and 4100 South.

Mountain View Corridor (MVC) currently runs 15 miles from 16000 South to 5400 South.

Funding and Schedule – Funding has been allocated to extend MVC from 5400 South to 4100 South. UDOT is using design-build construction for the next phase. A Request for Qualifications (RFQ) will be released in April 2015, followed by a Request for Proposals (RFP) and a contractor selection later in the year. Major construction is anticipated to start in 2016. Future funding is needed to extend MVC from 4100 South to SR-201.

Utility Work – UDOT continues to prepare for the next phase of construction for the Mountain View Corridor. Rocky Mountain Power and Kern River are relocating utility lines from 4700 South to 3500 South in preparation for future phases of MVC construction. Recently Rocky Mountain Power installed a 138 kV line from 5400 South to 4100 South. Crews are currently pouring the foundations for the rebar cage for a 345 kV line between 4100 South to 3500 South in the future MVC construction area.

Photo of rebar base for new powerline

Crews assemble a new power line in the MVC project area.

Water Tank – The MVC project needed to relocate an older, steel water tank near 4300 South. The water tank held 2 million gallons of water that proved to be too small for the growing area. UDOT and Granger-Hunter Improvement District (GHD)
worked together to build a new, 4 million gallon concrete water tank and built it in the neighborhood adjacent to the future MVC roadway.

Instead of disposing of the old water tank material, UDOT and GHD researched ways to re-use it. Cedar City was in need of a new water tank and contacted UDOT. The water tank was dismantled and transported to its new location for reassembly, saving taxpayers approximately $500,000.

Hillside Elementary and Future ROW – As part of the property acquisition process on MVC, the project team worked with Hillside Elementary to rebuild their playground. The newly construction playground is now complete.

UDOT is continuing to acquire properties in the future construction area. If you would like to learn more about the Mountain View Corridor project, visit udot.utah.gov/mountainview.

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Unified Police and Fire Conduct SWAT and Training Exercises at Homes Slated for Demolition

Photo of emergency responders outside abandoned houseOn Tuesday, July 8, 2014, the Unified Police and Fire Departments took advantage of a special offer and did what came naturally: knocked down doors, set off smoke grenades and shattered windows.

UDOT Region Two’s Bangerter & Redwood Road Interchange Improvement Project invited both the Unified Police and Fire Departments to conduct SWAT and rescue response exercises at vacant homes scheduled for demolition. The vacant homes allowed for Unified Police and Fire to create real-life scenarios and practice response methods in the event of an emergency.

More than 60 individuals participated in these training exercises. Decked out in full gear in 90-degree heat, Unified Police engaged in tactical training while Unified Fire simulated rescue efforts for individuals trapped in a home during a fire.

Photo of SWAT outside abandoned home“We recognized an opportunity to partner with Unified Police and Fire in a unique way. They make a great contribution in keeping our communities safe and we were happy to be able to support that,” said Marwan Farah, UDOT Region Two Resident Engineer.

The vacant homes had been acquired by UDOT in order to accommodate road widening for the Bangerter & Redwood Road project. Region Two is constructing a grade-separated single-point urban interchange (SPUI) for the intersection at Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road. Construction will be complete in spring 2015.

This guest post was taken from the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Raising Bangerter

Map of the temporary road

Crews have opened a new, temporary road that will move the majority of traffic out of the work zone and away from construction activities.

As part of a proactive effort to address immediate and long-term traffic needs, we are currently constructing improvements at Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road. This $42 million project includes a grade-separated single point urban interchange (SPUI) similar to the interchange of 7800 South and Bangerter Highway.

“We’re excited for the arrival of an interchange in this location,” said UDOT Region Two District Engineer Troy Peterson. “The communities located in the south valley of Salt Lake County continue to grow at an accelerated pace and these improvements are part of a long-range plan to accommodate immediate and future traffic demands. We will also increase mobility and improve safety for those commuting through the area by reducing conflict points.”

Schedule – Since the project received funding in September 2013, we have operated on an accelerated time table. The environmental study was conducted in fall 2013, Wadsworth Brothers Construction was selected as the contractor in April 2014 and construction began shortly after in June. The project will be complete in spring 2015.

The aggressive schedule has become the cornerstone for the project and has fostered an innovative approach. Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road are vital commuter routes and serve a large residential population with an emerging commercial area.

According to Resident Engineer Marwan Farah, “We have many stakeholder groups who will be impacted by construction activities and because of this we placed a high value on building the new freeway-style interchange as efficiently as possible. The project has many challenges to overcome, but we are finding ways to stick to our goals and meet milestones within the allotted timeframe.”

Innovation – In order to complete construction by spring 2015, innovative steps are being implemented. Perhaps the most unique approach is the introduction of a new, temporary road located at 13920 South (also known as Market View Drive) about a half block south of the Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road intersection. 13920 South was an access road to The Bluffs Apartments, which has been expanded to provide a direct east-west connection between Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road. During construction, many of the intersection’s turn movements have been relocated to the new, temporary road and Bangerter Highway’s through traffic has been shifted to the outside lanes. This allows the contractor to build the grade-separated overpass and accompanying tie-ins quicker because the majority of traffic is removed from the work zone.

As part of the new, temporary road, a temporary continuous flow intersection (CFI) has been constructed on Bangerter Highway, which will be in place until project completion. The temporary CFI has a traffic signal and dedicated turn lanes at Bangerter Highway, which provide direct access to the temporary road.

Another innovation that was implemented is the introduction of the Lump Sum Relocation Program, which allowed for residents of properties being purchased for the project to receive relocation monetary benefits in one payment. This program for Right-of-Way relocation was piloted on Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road to determine if it would assist in expediting the project’s relocation needs and overall schedule.

“We have been very happy with the Lump Sum Relocation Program on this project. Overall, it was productive, efficient, lowered costs and saved time,” said Farah.

Public Involvement – Even with innovation like the temporary road, not all impacts can be eliminated through construction. The project team is committed to completing the project with as little inconvenience to the public as possible. We have a robust public involvement approach to connect with drivers and stakeholders impacted by the project. Outreach efforts have included public meetings, mailer and flier distribution, media coverage, city presentations, in-person meetings and a dedicated project website, email and hotline. Our public involvement team has worked closely with the project team and contractor to understand the needs and benefits of the project and how best to communicate them to the public.

Both Bluffdale and Riverton cities have expressed deep appreciation for the planned improvements and the contribution it will make to their communities. They see this as a major step to continued development in the area. According to Riverton City Mayor Bill Applegarth, “This project is a significant improvement that will help increase efficiency and ease of travel for our growing population and people who commute through the southwest valley. UDOT’s preparation and communication regarding this project, as well as many others, has been extremely helpful.”

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

I-80 Crash Silver Barrel Awards

Executive Director Carlos Braceras awarded twelve Region Two employees with a Silver Barrel Award for their efforts related to a semi crash on I-80 that closed the road for several hours. Details of their efforts are below and the recipients included:

  • Shane Bushell
  • Rick Debban
  • Nick Jarrett
  • Robert Miles
  • Cody Moore
  • Stuart Ovard
  • Rick Potter
  • Bryant Richins
  • Jason Richins
  • Layne Thornton
  • Dottie Weese
  • Ron Williams

On July 16, 2014, Summit County Dispatch called Bryant Richins the Echo Station Supervisor around 5 a.m. and asked him to respond to a semi crash on I-80 westbound in Echo Canyon.

Due to the severity of this crash and with both semis on fire, I-80 was closed in both directions.

Bryant and his crew provided the traffic control and set up a left lane closure from the Echo Port of entry to the maintenance turnaround at milepost 183. This provided emergency vehicles a way to travel westbound if they needed to get past the crash scene.

I-80 eastbound was opened to one lane of traffic around 8 a.m. The crew was then asked for material to contain the water and hazardous runoff from fighting the fire. Two trucks from the Wanship Station hauled material up and contained the runoff.

The crew then started to assist in the clean up of the crash but the fireman in charge was concerned with the possibility of the loads flaring up. They discussed several possibilities and it was decided the UDOT crew would tip the loads over with their loader so they could get water on it to better extinguish the smoldering fire. This alone was estimated to save a couple of hours in the clean up of the accident.

The UDOT Echo Crew then worked with the tow company and firemen and offered to use their four UDOT ten wheel dump trucks and loader to haul the debris to the landfill. The Summit County Fire Department tried to cut up the burnt semis with their chop saws but it was taking too much time. Bryant offered to have his equipment operator go in with the loader and smash and roll up the debris and then load it in to UDOT’s ten wheelers. This saved an estimated four hours. Bryant then proposed his plan with the UDOT Area Supervisor and called Morgan Asphalt around 9 a.m. to notify them he would need their services in Echo Canyon to rotomill and repave the damaged/burnt asphalt. The crash debris was cleaned up and Morgan Asphalt was able to start rotomilling and paving around 2 p.m. The interstate was repaved and all lanes open to traffic by 5:45 p.m.

This is a great example of successful partnering with Utah Highway Patrol, Summit County Law Enforcement, Summit County Fire Department, Summit County Health Department, Moores Towing, the UDOT Incident Management Team, the UDOT Region Safety Manager, the UDOT Area Supervisor, UDOT Wanship Station 236, and UDOT Echo Station 238! Due to this successful partnering they were able to safely reopen Interstate I-80 and estimated 6 hours early.

This guest post was taken from the Silver Barrel nomination written by Todd Richins, UDOT Region Two East Area Supervisor.

State Street Resurfacing Near Downtown Salt Lake City

Aerial photo of State Street looking north toward Salt Lake CityEarlier this summer, Region Two completed one of this year’s Top 10 Construction Projects – right in the middle of Salt Lake City. Construction crews from Staker Parson Companies and its subcontractors resurfaced a four mile stretch of State Street between 400 South and 3000 South – spanning both Salt Lake and South Salt Lake cities. Crews replaced old asphalt with a one inch Open Graded Surface Course (OGSC), rebuilt 141 pedestrian ramps and 23 medians, and upgraded traffic signals at 12 intersections. The $4 million project started in late April and was successfully completed in late July.

This section of State Street was last resurfaced in 2004. The roadway was starting to form potholes, and concrete medians were reaching the end of their design life. These factors indicated to UDOT that a preservation project was needed. The new pavement surface is expected to last eight to ten years and the concrete work including the new pedestrian ramps and medians is expected to last 30 to 40 years.

With work taking place on a seven-lane arterial in a central business district, the State Street resurfacing project presented several construction challenges. Cars consistently parked in the work zone near downtown Salt Lake City, which required extra signage to control. The old utilities in South Salt Lake were fragile to work around, and the unusually rainy July caused minor schedule changes. The Region Two crew and contractor team worked together to successfully complete work on time in spite of these challenges.

Aerial photo of State Street looking southTo minimize impacts to drivers and businesses, most of the work on the project was scheduled during overnight hours. The project team coordinated closely with local business owners and residents throughout construction to keep them apprised of upcoming access and parking restrictions, overnight work, and other potential impacts. The public involvement team distributed fliers, answered hotline calls and responded to emails to address concerns and respond to questions.

In addition to businesses and residents, key project stakeholders included Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake City, UTA, Intermountain Harley Davidson, the Utah Pride Festival (UPF) and the Utah Arts Festival (UAF). During the project, Intermountain Harley Davidson attracted a few thousand motorcyclists to a series of events, such as the MDA Rock & Roll Ride and the Demo Days Ride; UPF attracted over 20,000 attendees, and UAP attracted over 80,000 attendees. Special efforts were made to modify the construction schedule to accommodate these festivals and other events. This coordination helped promote a safe and accessible festival experience.

The project received media attention at the beginning of construction. Fox 13 wrote a story that highlighted the type of work taking place on the State Street. As part of the story, Resident Engineer Bryan Chamberlain and Wild Mushroom Pizza owner James Zuiter were both interviewed. Chamberlain emphasized how crews worked at night to get the most done while impacting the fewest people, and Zuiter confirmed that despite the short-term inconvenience, business owners appreciate a freshly surfaced road.

The State Street project was accomplished on time, within budget, and with minimal inconvenience to the public. The newly-resurfaced road, reconstructed medians, and new pedestrian ramps will provide a smoother ride for drivers and enhance safety for pedestrians for years to come.

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Dan Betts Silver Barrel

Dan Betts received a Silver Barrel Award for his solution to striping problems on I-80 in Parley’s Canyon. After receiving several complaints about low striping visibility Dan and UDOT Central Maintenance determined there was a problem. Dan contacted the manufacturer because the striping was still under warranty and came up with a great solution.

  • The manufacturer would replace the striping tape on I-80 between Mt. Aires Exit 132 and Lambs Canyon Exit 137, including installation and traffic control.
  • The upper section of I-80 from Lambs Canyon Exit 137 to Kimball Junction Exit 145 paint would be applied over the existing striping tape since the pavement is in need of treatment and tape would not be cost effective. The manufacturer would install the paint including the traffic control.
  • UDOT Region Two would provide the grooves for the striping tape to be applied.
  • The manufacturer would provide an additional four year warranty for the entire section, both taped and painted.

Through Dan’s efforts and negotiating skills he was able to improve striping on I-80 through Parley’s Canyon.

This guest post was taken from the Silver Barrel Nomination submitted to the UDOT Administration Office.

Urban speed limits raised to Keep Utah Moving

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah Department of Transportation crews canvassed the urban interstate across the Wasatch Front, replacing speed limit signs while officially changing the speed limit from 65 to 70 mph.

A new 70 mph speed limit sign waits to be installed.

A new 70 mph speed limit sign waits to be installed.

In an effort to optimize mobility and Keep Utah Moving, crews from UDOT Regions One, Two and Three spent all day on December 8th, changing out 99 signs from Spanish Fork to Ogden. In many instances, the crews simply placed a decal on the existing sign, but several of the older signs were replaced outright.

The speed limit increased on Interstates 15, 80 and 215. However, two sections of I-80 will remain at 65 mph, as engineering studies show the terrain doesn’t allow for a speed increase.

The choice to implement the new speed limits was based on several studies, and in response to last year’s legislation (H.B. 80).

Utah is not the first state to raise speed limits to 70 mph or faster. Nearly one-third of the United States has speed limits set at 70 mph or faster in urban areas, and more than two-thirds of states have increased them in rural areas.

UDOT workers change out speed limit signs on I-80 westbound

UDOT workers change out speed limit signs on I-80 westbound

 

Mountain Accord: Shaping the Future of the Central Wasatch

Photo of Wasatch MountainsMountain Accord is a public process initiated to gather input from local residents and stakeholders and make long-term decisions regarding the future of the central Wasatch Mountains. By using public input and previous research as a framework, the project team and active participants are evaluating four major topic areas and how they relate to each other in the central Wasatch region: transportation, environment, recreation and economy.

Mountain Accord is made up of more than 20 diverse organizations including local, state and federal government entities, members of the local business community and several non-profit organizations. Region Two Director Nathan Lee is representing UDOT on the Mountain Accord Executive Board that was formed to provide consensus-based oversight, solicit funding, resolve disputes, approve recommendations, and set the overall program direction and policy.

The Mountain Accord process consists of two principle phases. Phase one began in January 2014. Since then, small stakeholder working groups have been studying current and projected future conditions within the study area in Salt Lake, Summit, and Wasatch counties. The process is drawing from continuous public input, existing plans and studies, and collaboration among Mountain Accord’s participating agencies and key stakeholders.

Several Region Two officials participate in these working groups and are using this information to develop potential future scenarios for the central Wasatch Mountains and canyons that address transportation, environment, recreation and economic goals. These alternatives are scheduled to be open for public review and input in December, with public open houses scheduled for early January. Phase one will culminate in the selection of a preferred scenario and specific actions for each of the four areas of interest.

During Phase Two, the Mountain Accord project team will work through appropriate agencies and entities to implement these proposed actions. For more information about Mountain Accord and how you can get involved in this important process to shape the future of the central Wasatch, visit www.mountainaccord.com.

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

UDOT app wins award for digital pioneering

SALT LAKE CITY — The pioneering sprit has always been in Utah’s blood. From the Winchester rifle, Word Perfect and wider Pioneer Streets, to the Roadometer and Television, Utah has always tried to be at the forefront of technology.

In the digital age, the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) has continued as a technological pioneer, especially in the field of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS). It was recently awarded a “Best of ITS” award by the ITS World Congress this fall for its Citizen Reporter app, which was piloted during the 2012-2013 winter season.

Citizen Report Screenshot

A screenshot of the Citizen Report app

The app, which is the first of its kind in the United States, is aimed at Keeping Utah Moving, specifically during winter months. It allows citizen volunteers to report on road weather conditions along specific roadways across the Beehive State, after a short training session. These reports give enhanced road weather information to travelers when the stakes are the highest — during inclement weather. 

In large, sparsely populated states like Utah, state DOTs have trouble providing up-to-the-minute accuracy on road conditions to travelers. It’s especially tough in Utah, where nearly 1,000 cameras statewide still can’t see every inch of roadway. But that’s where crowd sourcing from citizen reporters comes in, providing more accurate and timely information to the traveling public on conditions around the state.

Lisa Miller, UDOT’s Traveler Information Manager, said the program was extremely successful, with over 1100 reports last year from approximately 500 reporters. She predicts four times the usage of the app this coming year.

“Our early concern was that the data might not be reliable,” Miller said. “But what we’ve found is that the incoming data is 99% accurate.”

Other states, such as Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Montana, Nebraska and North Dakota have requested information from UDOT to create similar programs in those states. The success of the program has spurred the department to produce another app, called Click N Fix, which allows the public to report potholes, burnt out highway lights, and other safety issues. The app will be more widely available to the public in early 2015.

The 2014 ITS World Congress

UDOT was awarded a “Best of ITS” award for “Best New Innovative Practice” in September.

“Crowd-sourcing is emerging as an effective means to both engage and serve the public, Miller said. “The public can now make more informed travel decisions, which impacts everything: safety, mobility, and the economy.”

To become a Citizen Reporter:

In order to become a UDOT Citizen Reporter, you will need to complete a brief training (either online or in person), take a short quiz and complete a sign-up form. The training takes approximately 10 minutes to complete. Once a volunteer has completed these steps, they will be provided with a login and PIN, and can begin submitting reports. Reports are submitted through the UDOT Citizen Reporting app, downloadable for Android and Apple devices from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

If you would like to become a Citizen Reporter, please follow this link to take the online training: www.udottraffic.utah.gov/training/citizenreporter. For more information or to schedule an in person training, email UDOTCitizenReporter@utah.gov.

You can download the Citizen Reports app for your iPhone or Android device.

UDOT leader named top young transportation innovator

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Utah Department of Transportation is known for exciting innovations such as accelerated bridge construction and advanced intersection designs. But innovation doesn’t have to be flashy to be valuable.

GIS Manager Becky Hjelm speaks after winning the 2014 Vanguard Award at the AASHTO Annual Conference in Charlotte.

GIS Manager Becky Hjelm speaks after winning the 2014 Vanguard Award at the AASHTO Annual Conference in Charlotte.

Becky Hjelm, GIS Manager at the Utah Department of Transportation, has been integral to some of UDOT’s recent innovations through data-driven projects aimed to Keep Utah Moving.

For her efforts, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) is honoring Hjelm as its 2014 Transportation Vanguard Award winner.

The national award is given by AASHTO to recognize an individual aged 40 or younger who is leading the way in doing extraordinary things in the field of transportation by “exemplifying a commitment to excellence and implementation of innovative technologies and processes.” It was created in honor of Jim McMinimee, a UDOT leader who passed away in 2012.

Hjelm, who has been at UDOT for just under three years, has proven herself to be a visionary, with the ability to build effective teams and work strategically to accomplish more than thought possible. She does it by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) along with her attention to detail, outreach and collaboration talents.

“Through her leadership, UDOT has embraced GIS,” said Randy Park, UDOT’s Director of Development. “The way we do business is changing rapidly, and the increased reliance on data is making us more efficient.”

Hjelm has been part of a big culture change at UDOT, through her contagious excitement about the technology. During her short time at the department, she’s identified and implemented many projects and opportunities, including geo-referencing CAD files, creating an Outdoor Advertising Control Map, implementing ProjectWise layers statewide, and establishing a new Emergency Management Tool.

Becky Hjelm (center) poses with her UDOT GIS team.

Becky Hjelm (center, in vest) poses with her UDOT GIS team.

Some of her most valuable work has been her work on an asset management data project. UDOT had already asked Mandli Communications to perform LIDAR scanning, which allows engineers and scientists to examine natural and built environments across a wide range of scales with greater accuracy, precision and flexibility. The state has scans of every state route, which includes pavement and other asset data.  Using that large amount of data would prove to be difficult without using GIS. So Hjelm organized a cross-departmental team to accomplish the task of building the tool in a timely manner, saving countless hours and hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars.

Park said UDOT expects the culture change and innovation to continue to benefit the State of Utah for years to come.

“There isn’t just one innovative idea that Becky has implemented. She’s put in place an entire program that continues to grow,” he said.