Tag Archives: highway maintenance

Warm winter provides opportunity for maintenance work

Editor’s Note: This post was written by Eileen Barron, Region Three Communications Manager. You can follow the news from the region by following @UDOTRegion3. 

It’s something we can all relate to: that long list of things you’d like to do, if only you had time. The good news for UDOT’s maintenance crews is that the light snowfall and warm temperatures in January and February have allowed us to get a jump-start on our to-do list. UDOT’s crews in the six-county area of Region Three have performed more than half a million dollars of maintenance during the first eight weeks of 2015. Here’s a sample of what we’ve been up to:

Crack sealing: UDOT prolongs the life and quality of our pavement by sealing cracks with an asphalt sealant. Sealing cracks reduces the amount of moisture getting underneath the pavement that can damage the subsurface of the roadway. Crews have done more than $50,000 of crack sealing, including sections of Nephi Main Street, Redwood Road west of Utah Lake, Timpanogos Highway in Highland and SR-113 in Midway. Crews have also performed $50,000 in pot hole patching.

UDOT Crews perform a crack seal on a portion of SR-92 in Utah County.

UDOT crews perform a crack seal on a portion of SR-92 in Utah County.

Road sweeping and litter pick-up: UDOT has a regular schedule of sweeping roads and shoulders to remove debris. The mild winter has allowed crews to do some extra clean-up in terms of litter control and sweeping. More than $100,000 has been expended cleaning up Utah’s roads. Crews have also performed almost $10,000 in tree trimming.

Sign repair and replacement: Crews have replaced or repaired signs and sign posts throughout the region in locations such as I-15 in Utah County, US-40 north of Heber and near Duchesne as well as SR-32 south of Jordanelle Reservoir near Francis. We installed all new milepost signs on Pioneer Crossing in Lehi and Saratoga Springs and on SR-129 North County Boulevard in American Fork. Region-wide, the total spent on signs the first two months of 2015 is nearly $90,000.

Cable barrier, guardrail and fence repair: We have repaired or replaced cable barrier and guardrail in places like Provo Canyon and the Mayflower area of US-40. These repairs help maintain safety on the roadway. We have also repaired snow fencing on SR-92 and right of way fencing on I-15 between Springville and Lindon. These fences help the functionality of our roadways by minimizing blowing snow and keeping animals off the interstate. Fencing has also been repaired on US-6 in Spanish Fork Canyon and US-89 near Thistle. Attenuators that act as crash cushions and delineators that help mark driving lanes have also been replaced and repaired along several routes, including a stretch of US-40 near Strawberry Reservoir. More than $100,000 has been spent on repairs of these roadside features.

A truck passes by a cable barrier on the interstate.

A truck passes by a cable barrier on the interstate.

Cleaning out culverts and drains: UDOT crews have also been cleaning out culverts and drainage features in areas such as I-15 from Springville to Lindon, SR-132 in Salt Creek Canyon, SR-191 south of Duchesne and SR-87 north of Duchesne. This is a regular spring maintenance activity that we are able to initiate earlier this year due to mild temperatures. Drainage for water run-off is designed as part of our projects and maintenance crews make sure these drains and culverts are clear from debris so they function properly. Nearly $40,000 in drainage activities have been recorded in Region Three during January and February.

Our Orem crew cleans drains along a part of I-15.

Our Orem crew cleans drains along a part of I-15.

Accident response and repairs: UDOT crews are called upon to make repairs and clean-up the roadway after a crash. Activities may include repair of fence or barrier, signs and sweeping. These are often recoverable expenses for the department paid for by drivers’ insurance. More than $60,000 in accident repair has taken place in Region Three in 2015.

UDOT releases 2015 top 15 construction projects list

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) announced today its top 15 road construction projects for 2015.

More than 180 construction projects are scheduled statewide this year, and motorists will need to plan accordingly. This season, UDOT is adding new lanes to freeways and highways, and building new roads to keep Utah moving. Crews will continue to perform maintenance on the state’s roads and bridges to ensure they remain in good condition and last as long as possible.

With two of the top projects located on Interstate 15, UDOT recommends motorists along the Wasatch Front rethink how they commute to reduce delays by carpooling, using transit, adjusting work schedules to leave earlier or stay later, or telecommuting.

The following is a list of the top 15 projects statewide in 2015:

1. I-15 The Point (Project Value $252 million)
Construction starts March 2015; scheduled completion fall 2016

UDOT’s largest project will widen I-15 to six lanes in each direction between 12300 South in Draper and state Route 92 in Lehi. The project will also reconstruct the interchange at 14600 South. Four lanes in each direction will remain open during daytime hours, but motorists should plan for delays due to lane shifts and other activities.

2. I-15 South Davis (Project Value $126.9 million)
Under construction; scheduled completion fall 2015

Last year’s largest construction project is scheduled for completion this year. Crews continue work to add Express Lanes on I-15 from North Salt Lake to Farmington. Work is also underway to reconstruct interchanges at 2600 South and 500 South in Bountiful as well as bridges at 1500 South and 400 North. Drivers can expect lane shifts as well as nighttime lane restrictions and surface street closures during construction.

SouthDavisConstruction

3. I-80, Silver Creek to Wanship (Project Value $43 million)
Construction resumes in April; scheduled completion fall 2015

Work will resume this spring to complete the reconstruction of eight miles of I-80 with new concrete pavement between US-40 and Wanship. In addition, two bridges over I-80 are scheduled to be reconstructed this summer. Long-term lane restrictions will last from April through the fall with a small number of overnight freeway closures to accommodate bridge work.

i-80 Silver Creek to Wanship

4. I-15 Beaver Climbing Lanes (Project Value $44 million)
Construction starts March 2015; scheduled completion November 2015

I-15 is being widened in two locations in central and southern Utah to add climbing lanes to enhance safety. Lane restrictions will be in place through much of the summer to allow crews to construct these new lanes. Motorists should plan ahead and allow extra travel time when traveling to and from St. George or Las Vegas.

Beaver Climbing lanes

5. SR-36 Reconstruction (Project Value $25.6 million)
Construction starts spring 2015; scheduled completion fall 2015

A 10-mile stretch of state Route 36 in Tooele County is being reconstructed with new pavement, curb/gutter/sidewalk, and drainage improvements. Construction is scheduled to begin as early as April, and will continue for several months. Drivers will need to watch for traffic shifts and various restrictions to accommodate the work.

SR 36 Tooele

6. I-15 Hill Field Road interchange and Thru-Turn Intersections (Project Value $28 million)
Construction starts spring 2015; scheduled completion fall 2016

The interchange at I-15 and Hill Field Road is being converted to a single-point urban interchange to improve traffic flow and reduce congestion in the area. This project will also construct new Thru-Turn Intersections on Hill Field Road on each side of I-15. Construction is scheduled to begin this spring and continue through 2016. Drivers should plan ahead for lane restrictions and traffic delays throughout construction.

7. Bangerter/Redwood Interchange (Project Value $42 million)
Under construction; scheduled completion July 2015

Crews are completing the new interchange at Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road. Temporary traffic patterns in the area will continue through the summer. When complete, the new freeway-style interchange will be similar to the one constructed at Bangerter Highway and 7800 South.

RedwoodBangerter

8. I-215, 300 East to Redwood Road (Project Value $14 million)
Construction starts July 2015; scheduled completion October 2015

This heavily-traveled section of I-215 is being reconstructed this year. Crews will be removing the top layer of asphalt and replacing it with new pavement, as well as installing drainage improvements. Motorists should plan for lane restrictions and moderate traffic delays.

9. US-40, SR-208 to Duchesne (Project Value $14.6 million)
Construction starts spring 2015; scheduled completion August 2015

UDOT will be removing the top layer of asphalt and repaving 18 miles of US-40 in Duchesne County. This project will prolong the life of the road and provide a smoother ride for drivers. Lane restrictions and minor traffic delays are possible through the summer.

US 40 Duchesne

10. SR-108, 2000 West in Roy/Ogden (Project Value $16.9 million)
Under construction; scheduled completion summer 2015 

A 4.5-mile section of state Route 108 in Davis and Weber counties is being widened and reconstructed. One lane in each direction will be added, as well as curb, gutter and sidewalk. Motorists should plan ahead for lane restrictions and temporary access restrictions at intersections.

SR 108 Weber County

11. Provo Westside Connector/Vineyard Connector (Project Value $21.1/$13.7 million)
Under construction; scheduled completion spring 2016

Two new arterial roads are being constructed to serve the fast-growing areas of Provo and Vineyard in Utah County. Construction has already begun on these roads, and motorists using nearby or connecting streets should watch for trucks and other equipment.

ProvoWestside

 

For more information on the Vineyard connector, please e-mail udotregion3@utah.gov or call our region hotline 801-830-9304.

12. U.S. 89/State Street, Sandy and Draper (Project Value $2.7 million)
Construction starts summer 2015; scheduled completion fall 2015

Two sections of State Street – from 8000 South to 9000 South, and from 11400 South to 11800 South – will be repaved this summer. Work will primarily take place during nighttime hours, and motorists should expect lane restrictions and business access restrictions during this time.

US 89 Sandy:Draper State Street

13. U.S. 89/Harrison Boulevard intersection (Project Value $6.3 million)
Construction starts May 2015; scheduled completion September 2015

UDOT will realign the intersection of US-89 with Harrison Boulevard to improve traffic flow and will install additional safety improvements in the area. U.S. -89 will also be widened near the intersection. Occasional lane closures will be necessary to complete the work, and motorists should expect additional congestion due to construction.

14. SR-7, Warner Valley to Washington Dam Road (Project Value $21 million)
Under construction; scheduled completion December 2015

Construction continues to extend state Route 7 (Southern Parkway) near the St. George Airport. This extension of the new highway will help improve travel between the new airport and area recreation sites including Zion National Park and Sand Hollow Reservoir.

Southern Parkway

15. Antelope Drive, 2200 West to University Park Boulevard (Project Value $8 million)
Under construction; scheduled completion May 2015

Antelope Drive is being widened near the I-15 interchange to improve traffic flow and enhance safety in the area. Additional turn lanes are being constructed near the entrance to Davis Hospital and Medical Center. Lane restrictions and occasional delays are expected, but two lanes in each direction will remain open on Antelope Drive at all times.

AntelopeDrive

UDOT wants motorists to be in the know regarding construction projects and traffic delays. The following tools are available to provide information about projects and traffic conditions statewide:

UDOT Traffic App — The UDOT Traffic app delivers traffic info directly to motorists by incorporating the best and most up-to-date information from the UDOT Traffic Operations Center, including real-time traffic conditions, construction alerts, crash information and road weather conditions. The UDOT Traffic app is free and available for download in the Apple App Store and Android Market for tablets and smart phones.

Interactive UDOT Traffic Website — The website, http://udottraffic.utah.gov, features an interactive map identifying the locations of UDOT projects statewide. Additional information is provided for each project, including the construction schedule, expected travel delays and the project benefits. The public can also subscribe to an RSS feed on the site to receive real-time updates for the projects that affect them most.

UDOT social media — UDOT offers an official Twitter feed and Facebook page; UDOT Traffic and its four regions statewide also operate Twitter accounts. Motorists can find a list of these feeds at twitter.com/UtahDOT where they can receive regular updates on road construction and traffic conditions.

Bridging Borders: UDOT engineer featured in AZDOT video

With hundreds of miles of interstate weaving through Utah, have you ever wondered how UDOT deals with transportation issues where highways and interstates cross state lines? This video, produced by our friends at the Arizona Department of Transportation, shows what happens on a project in the Virgin River Gorge, which Interstate 15 runs through. Our own Dana Meier, a UDOT Program Engineer assigned to Washington County in Southern Utah, is featured in it.

The Gorge is a main thoroughfare for those seeking to get between Salt Lake City and Las Vegas, and is a huge connection point for those moving on to Los Angeles and Phoenix. A shutdown of this 29-mile section of road in Arizona can have wide-reaching effects nationally.

In the video, Region 4’s Meier, a 16-year veteran of the department, explains why interstate collaboration is so important.

“That little stretch of I-15 is a critical link for commerce from the port of Long Beach to the rest of the nation,” Meier said. “Maintaining the continuity and communication is critical for the entire system to function. It doesn’t just affect Utah. It affects Nevada and Arizona. It affects all of us.

At UDOT, collaboration is one of our valued emphasis areas. Teaming with local and interstate partners helps meet local and out-of-town traveler needs by providing a better product, and helps various entities share much-needed knowledge and skill. Collaboration also saves time and taxpayer dollars by avoiding costly arguments, claims and litigation.

 

 

BYU students get hands-on experience at UDOT

BYU asphalt test

Students from BYU’s Civil Engineering program get hands-on training on asphalt tests

A countertop with baking pans, spatulas and mixers is not something you’d expect to find when you think of UDOT. But they’re all important tools that help us preserve our infrastructure in Utah.

How, you ask? On Tuesday, Jan. 27, students from Brigham Young University’s Civil Engineering program found out during a trip to Region Three’s Materials Lab in Orem.

Using oil, water, a vacuum and a lot of ovens, the students took part in hands-on training on asphalt testing and verification of asphalt mix design by baking, scooping, calculating and compacting the material.

DSC_5554

BYU Civil Engineering students pose with William “Billy Bob” Larson, Region 3 Lab Manager (t-shirt) and Clint Tyler (far left).

Before paving occurs on a roadway, engineers determine the appropriate materials for the project, document the specifications for a concrete or asphalt mix and test the pavement design in the lab. These tests help ensure that the road surfaces we lay down are the most efficient, longest-lasting they can be. We believe that good roads cost less: less to build and less to maintain. Through quality assurance tests at our region labs, we maximize the value of taxpayer dollars.

 Lab Manager William “Billy Bob” Larson said his lab invites students from BYU and Utah Valley University to take part in hands-on learning on a regular basis to enhance what they learn in the classroom.

 “If you don’t actually get out and do it, all your learning is just words,” Larson said.

IMG_7958

BYU pride on one student’s asphalt core

New Mobile App: UDOT Click ‘n Fix

Photo of iPhone Click 'n Fix appDid you know that 630 UDOT maintenance employees take care of nearly 6,000 miles of highway around Utah? It’s true, and they do an excellent job of finding and fixing issues before most of us even notice. However, with that many roads, we can help them by keeping an eye out for problems and letting them know about it. To make submitting service requests as easy as possible, we’ve implemented a new iPhone and Android app called UDOT Click ‘n Fix.

UDOT Click ‘n Fix allows anyone to report an issue by dropping a pin on a map at the location of the problem. It also allows others to see everything that has been reported and to add their own comments or follow the issue to receive notifications.

Once the location is selected Click ‘n Fix asks a few follow up questions to help crews understand what needs to be fixed. Submitted issues are sent to UDOT crews and a response is posted as soon as possible.

Keep in mind, UDOT will only be able to help with issues on federal interstates and state highways like Bangerter Highway (S.R. 154) and State Street (U.S. 89). Also, while safety is our top priority, this tool is for non-emergency purposes.

To use UDOT Click ‘n Fix, download the iPhone or Android app or visit the UDOT website and use the embedded widget.

See the desktop tutorial:

See a mobile tutorial at KUTV.com:

Urban speed limits raised to Keep Utah Moving

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah Department of Transportation crews canvassed the urban interstate across the Wasatch Front, replacing speed limit signs while officially changing the speed limit from 65 to 70 mph.

A new 70 mph speed limit sign waits to be installed.

A new 70 mph speed limit sign waits to be installed.

In an effort to optimize mobility and Keep Utah Moving, crews from UDOT Regions One, Two and Three spent all day on December 8th, changing out 99 signs from Spanish Fork to Ogden. In many instances, the crews simply placed a decal on the existing sign, but several of the older signs were replaced outright.

The speed limit increased on Interstates 15, 80 and 215. However, two sections of I-80 will remain at 65 mph, as engineering studies show the terrain doesn’t allow for a speed increase.

The choice to implement the new speed limits was based on several studies, and in response to last year’s legislation (H.B. 80).

Utah is not the first state to raise speed limits to 70 mph or faster. Nearly one-third of the United States has speed limits set at 70 mph or faster in urban areas, and more than two-thirds of states have increased them in rural areas.

UDOT workers change out speed limit signs on I-80 westbound

UDOT workers change out speed limit signs on I-80 westbound

 

Innovative partnerships prove to be the perfect recipe for Patchwork Parkway

PANGUITCH — In a state where innovation is consistently used to Keep Utah Moving, sometimes innovation alone isn’t enough. Unique partnerships between state agencies can be the perfect additional ingredient to accomplish the improbable.

In rural southern Utah, where equipment and manpower are sometimes as few and far between as the towns in the region, innovation and partnering got a much-needed job done quickly and efficiently, while minimizing the use of taxpayer dollars.

Recently, UDOT’s shed 4469 in Panguitch teamed up with Bryce Canyon National Park to create a shoulder on a seven-mile stretch of Scenic Byway SR-143. This stretch of Utah’s “Patchwork Parkway” was in great need of a shoulder, because a simple task like plowing the road or pulling over created potential safety issues.

The project required tools neither the department nor the national park possessed alone. So to combat this issue, they came together to pool resources and manpower to finish the job in a few days, saving each agency valuable time and money.

“The stars just lined up,” said Panguitch Shed manager Robert Brown. “Down here, we’re all neighbors, and you have to get creative to help each other out and get things done.”

Normally, a similar project requires a team of at least six to eight workers, with three on a shouldering machine alone. But with only two full-time employees at the shed, Brown and his counterpart at Bryce Canyon had to think outside of the box. Here are some of the highlights:

• Bryce Canyon provided side delivery dump trucks that offered a more efficient use of asphalt. Standard machines provide four feet of material, even if only two feet are needed.
• UDOT’s grader was used to accomplish both the grading and compaction tasks, as the shoulder in the area is too steep to use conventional steel drum rollers.
• The asphalt used on the project was recycled and obtained from a pit in nearby Hatch, Utah at nearly one-third of the cost of new asphalt.
• The project was completed in two days, with two UDOT Panguitch Shed employees and two Bryce Canyon employees.
• A pull-behind broom hooked to a pickup truck cleaned the road with two passes.

For Brown, the lesson is simple: when government entities work and plan together, the result can be a win-win for both, as well as the surrounding communities.

“Without the shared resources, we wouldn’t have been able to do the job,” Brown said. “I think this shows that governments need to think outside of the box more to collaborate.”

Comparison of Wintertime Asphalt and Concrete Pavement Surface Temperatures in Utah

Because winter maintenance is so costly, UDOT personnel asked researchers at Brigham Young University (BYU) to determine whether asphalt or concrete pavements require more winter maintenance. Differing thermal properties suggest that, for the same environmental conditions, asphalt and concrete pavements will have different temperature profiles. Climatological data from 22 environmental sensor stations (ESSs) near asphalt roads and nine ESSs near concrete roads were used to determine which pavement type has higher surface temperatures in winter.

Twelve continuous months of climatological data were acquired from the road weather information system operated by UDOT, and erroneous data were removed from the data set. In order to focus on the cold-weather pavement surface temperatures, a winter season was defined as the period from November through April, and the data were divided into time periods that were based on sunrise and sunset times to match the solar cycle.

To predict pavement surface temperature, a multiple linear regression was performed with input parameters of pavement type, time period, and air temperature. As shown in Table 1, the statistical analysis predicting pavement surface temperatures showed that, for near-freezing conditions, asphalt is better in the afternoon, and concrete is better for other times of the day. However, neither pavement type is better, on average, across the locations studied in this research. That is, asphalt and concrete are equally likely to collect snow or ice on their surfaces, and both pavements are expected to require equal amounts of winter maintenance, on average.

To supplement these analyses, which provided useful information about average pavement temperatures across the statewide pavement network, additional analyses of asphalt and concrete pavement surface temperatures were performed for a particular location in a mountainous region of northern Utah more typical of canyon areas. Asphalt and concrete pavement surface temperatures were directly compared at a location on U.S. Route 40 near Heber where asphalt and concrete meet end to end at the base of a mountain pass. As shown in Figure 1, an ESS was installed to facilitate monitoring of asphalt and concrete pavement surface temperatures, as well as selected climatic variables, at the site.

Data collected during the three winter seasons from 2009 to 2012 were analyzed in this research, and the same months and time periods used in the previous study were applied in this analysis as well. To compare the surface temperatures of the concrete and asphalt pavements during freezing conditions, multivariate regression analyses were performed. Equations were generated for three response variables, including the asphalt surface temperature, concrete surface temperature, and difference in temperatures between the asphalt and concrete surfaces.

The statistical models developed in the analyses show that the surface temperature of both asphalt and concrete pavement increases with increasing air temperature and decreases with increasing relative humidity and wind speed, and that the difference in pavement temperatures decreases with decreasing air temperature. For the studied site, the data indicate that concrete pavement will experience freezing before asphalt pavement for all time periods except late afternoon, when the pavement types are predicted to freeze at the same air temperature (see Table 2). Therefore, for material properties and environmental conditions similar to those evaluated at this U.S. 40 site, asphalt would require less winter maintenance, on average, than concrete.

Due to the interactions among albedo, specific heat, and thermal conductivity, the actual thermal behavior of a given pavement will depend on the material properties and environmental conditions specific to the site. As shown in this research, concrete pavement can be warmer than asphalt, which is typical of the statewide pavement network, on average, during late morning, evening, night, and early morning. However, the research also clearly shows that, in mountainous regions of northern Utah more typical of canyon areas, engineers may expect asphalt pavement to be warmer than concrete, or equal in temperature to it, during all time periods at sites that receive direct sun exposure, such as the one on U.S. Route 40 that was studied in this research. At such sites, selection of asphalt pavement may facilitate reduced winter maintenance costs; however, though statistically significant, relatively small differences in temperature between asphalt and concrete pavement surfaces may not warrant differences in actual winter maintenance practices. Other factors beyond pavement type, such as rutting and surface texture, may more strongly affect winter maintenance and should also be considered.

The results of the statewide comparison of wintertime temperatures of asphalt and concrete pavements, as well as the specific results for the U.S. 40 site near Heber, are detailed in two separate research reports available on the Research Division website.

This guest post was written by W. Spencer Guthrie, Ph.D., M.ASCE, Brigham Young University, and David Stevens, P.E., Research Program Manager, and was originally published in the Research Newsletter.

Pavement Marking Check-up

Photo of right side white lineRetroreflectivity, which makes pavement markings visible at night, happens when the light from vehicle headlights bounces back toward the driver’s eyes. Visible markings help prevent lane departure crashes. But markings degrade over time due to weather and wear from traffic, so departments of transportation need to keep on top of pavement marking maintenance through regular inspections and replacement of sub-par markings.

Until recently, markings were measured subjectively by just taking a look and rating the condition of the marking. For the past year, however, retroreflectivity has been measured objectively, and data from those measurements is available on UDOT’s Data Portal.

Each spring and fall, employees from UDOT’s Maintenance Planning Division measure the retroreflectivity of markings on a randomly chosen selection of roadway segments, including dashed lane markings and solid lines that mark the edge of the road.

Photo of the van that is used to measure pavement markingMeasurements are taken using a mobile retroreflectometer mounted in a van. The retroreflectometer, shoots a high intensity Laser in a sweeping motion over marked pavement and measures the light that reflects back in milli-candelas per lux per meter squared – a measure of light per unit area.

The data gathered by the measuring effort is compiled and graded from A+ to F – this spring, UDOT got a B. This year’s fall data is in the process of being compiled. The data on UDOT’s Data Portal can be viewed on a map alone or along with other data sets.

Over time, having an objective measurements of pavement retroreflectivity will help support safety by helping to direct funding where improvement is needed.

Parley’s Canyon Pipe Replacement

I-80 Drainage Pipepipes 1

UDOT is working with W.W. Clyde and Geneva Pipe to begin the replacement of an old drainage system in Parley’s Canyon. The construction, which started at the end of May, begins at the mouth of Parley’s Pipes 2Canyon on I-80 and will extend about 2.5 miles east into the canyon. The pipe will serve to drain Salt Lake City’s excess water as well as the canyon runoff.

The current 50-year-old pipe is buried, in some areas, more than 30-40 feet under the freeway. Crews will work to replace the deteriorating corrugated steel pipe with a new durable concrete pipe. The sections of pipe that are currently underground will be capped off and filled.

This blue metal casing is placed over the wired frame and then transported to the cement pouring deck.

This blue metal casing is placed over the wired frame and then transported to the cement pouring deck.

The new system will be built to the side of the road to make service and maintenance more manageable. This will also keep closures and impacts to a minimum during construction and future maintenance.

Each section of pipe weighs about 25,000 pounds and is 12 feet long. Geneva Pipe creates these massive cement structures at their site in Orem. The specific cement used is built to endure harsh conditions and erosion over time.

The cement is then poured and quickly mixed into the metal casing on the deck.

The cement is then poured and quickly mixed into the metal casing on the deck.

The pipes are made in the Geneva warehouse where the cement is poured into a metal casing that is tightly compacted to create large vertical cylinders that will dry overnight. The type of cement used dries fast because of the way that it is quickly sifted and tightly compacted under extreme amounts of pressure.

These are the wet concrete pipes that will dry overnight.

These are wet concrete pipes that will dry overnight.

Overnight blasting for the construction has already begun and drivers should expect up to 15 minute delays while blasting occurs.

Overnight lane restrictions will also be necessary but one lane in each direction will remain open. Motorists should expect delays, a reduced speed limit and lane closures throughout the project until November 2013. At least three lanes will remain open during high traffic times, including events and on weekends.

Here is a video of the blasting happening at I-80.