CLEAN SWEEP

UDOT sweepers go full force spring through fall.

Holly Wilkins, Mark Makin, JB Shandrow, Mikal Perrine and Dave Kelly operate the 'brooms' -- trucks that remove debris from roadways.

Rock chips on windshields are one of the hazards of freeway driving. Besides being dangerous, debris on interstates can also be washed off the pavement and clog culverts with sand and dirt resulting in improper drainage. Cleaning the freeway prevents UDOT maintenance crews from having to use expensive and obtrusive means – like Vactor trucks – to clear out culverts.

In order to keep safety and drainage issues in check, UDOT has sweeper trucks that make regular trips along I-15 in Salt Lake County. Lee Nitchman, Area Supervisor for UDOT says Region Two crews run brooms 6 days a week during the spring summer and fall. “They usually run them at night on the interstates and during the day on the surface streets.”

The only time the trucks are not operating is when maintenance is being performed. “Some areas of the interstate, like the Spaghetti Bowl, get swept almost nightly. We spend hundreds of thousands every year sweeping with the majority of it on the interstate,” says Nitchman.

Nitchman points out that keeping road free of gravel and dirt from dump trucks is a challenge. If those trucks are not cleaned after they are filled, they lose gravel from tailgates and fenders. “That is the biggest problem with keeping the roads clean,” he says.

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