Tag Archives: Traffic App

A google doodle with a Utah link

Whether you’re sitting at a red light or passing through on green, the traffic signal is one invention that revolutionized the world. And because of that, Google has taken to honor the anniversary of the first installation with a “doodle”.

August 5, 2015's Google Doodle

August 5, 2015’s Google Doodle

On August 5, 1914, the first traffic light was installed in Cleveland, Ohio, on the corner of 59th and Euclid. With 20,000 cars being sold per month in 1914, and horse-drawn wagons, street cars, and carts still in play, city streets in America were woefully congested, and a need arose for traffic management. Police used to stand in the middle of intersections and wave their arms to control traffic, and just before the turn of the century, England tried a gas-lit stoplight, but they had a tendency to explode.

But what does that have to do with Utah?

One of the solutions to the traffic management problem came when Lester Wire — a Salt Lake City policeman — created a traffic light out of a hand-made wooden box that had red and green lights whose wires were attached to light wires above. Right in the Beehive State, a solution was born. 

This replica of Lester Wire's first traffic light greets visitors to the UDOT Traffic Operations Center.

This replica of Lester Wire’s first traffic light greets visitors to the UDOT Traffic Operations Center.

We’ve come a long way since 1914, and UDOT is proud of what our employees at the Traffic Operations Center have done to create a state-of-the-art traffic management system. Instead of mechanical lights and wooden boxes, we use sophisticated computers that gather traffic and weather data to manage 60% of the 1,927 traffic lights statewide. We use that information to give you the best data, sent right to your smart phone, and we also have one of the few in-house DOT weather rooms, staffed with two full-time meteorologists and 8 weather professionals.

Next time you’re sitting at a red light or passing through on a green light, you can thank a fellow Utahn for coming up with a traffic solution. Thank you, Google, for giving us a chance to walk down memory lane!

UDOT’s Road Weather Information System Network helps with safety

RWIS Network Map

UDOT RWIS network

Utah’s unique geography can be a challenge for traffic management and safety. Many of the critical highway routes in the state are in rural areas and can be prone to flooding, snow drifts, landslides, high winds or low visibility due to wild fire smoke. UDOT’s Road Weather Information System (RWIS) network currently has nearly 80 deployments throughout the state. An RWIS unit has several weather sensors that calculate wind speed, precipitation type, roadway temperature and more. Some RWIS have a traffic camera as well.

Utah has had an active winter and spring with several large storms, flooding and landslides. In June, UDOT deployed a portable RWIS unit near Monument Peak on SR-31. This site was adjacent to an area that was burned in a forest fire and was at risk for landslides. The portable RWIS can be relocated at a later date for other uses. The RWIS sends alerts to the UDOT Traffic Operations Center (TOC) meteorologists who can then contact UDOT crews and UDOT management working in a specific area and alert them to any danger of landslides or flooding. The alert information is also shared with the National Weather Service, the National Forest Service, the United States Geological Survey, Utah Highway Patrol and other agencies. UDOT contracts with Northwest Weathernet for meteorological services and RWIS installation.

Photo of portable RWIS station

Portable RWIS unit being deployed for use during the Rockport 5 Fire

 

Screen shot of RWIS alert

A rainfall alert from the portable RWIS

 

For more information about our use of RWIS also check out RWIS Update and Forecasting for Smarties.

UDOT Traffic App Tutorial

Wouldn’t it be nice to have access to all of Utah’s weather, traffic information, major construction and road delays? Fortunately the Utah Department of Transportation has made this possible through a smart phone application called “UDOT Traffic”.

The traffic app has several different features which include a detailed map, alerts, road weather and mountain pass information. All of this data comes from the UDOT Traffic Operations Center (TOC) which provides 24/7 monitoring for roads around the state.

Here is a step by step tutorial of how to utilize the app’s features and information.

The map contains several different options that include: cameras, incidents/planned events, construction, overhead freeway signs otherwise know as Variable Message Signs (VMS) and traffic congestion. With your smart phone you can zoom to common locations, search a certain address or use your current location.

Areas of Utah can be selected based on common locations as well as being searched.

Areas of Utah can be selected based on common locations and searched as well.

Specific symbols can be selected or deselected to find a specific camera, construction zone, sign or alert.

Specific symbols can be selected or deselected to change what is visible on your map.

This map of Utah contains symbols representing cameras, construction sites, alerts, and VMS signs.

This map of Utah contains symbols representing cameras, construction sites, alerts, and VMS.

Map with just construction.

Here is a map with all the construction sites listed in Utah. By selecting a specific barrel, details can be found about the place, duration and lane closure information.

A camera view from US-6.

This is a camera view from U.S. 6 but other highways are available on the UDOT Traffic map. Camera images are updated regularly and include a time stamp so you know how recent the image is.

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VMS can also be viewed from the app. These show current travel times between the sign and certain locations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alerts are the second feature available from the main menu across the bottom and contain advice and warning information regarding emergencies, TravelWise, road conditions, incidents, special events, construction and seasonal roads.

An example of an alert with information on the locations and nature of the incident

Details on each alert can be accessed from a list or viewed on the map.

An example of an alert with information on the locations and nature of the incident

This is an example of an incident alert on the map. It contains information on the location, nature of the incident and impact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The third main feature of the app is all about weather. This section contains travel advisories, available during the winter months, as well as road forecasts and reports directly from our weather stations. Road forecasts and weather station data are available all year.

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Travel advisories, weather stations and road forecasts are available in the Weather section of UDOT Traffic App.

This is an example of a Road Forecast that will update every 3 hours with current weather.

Road Forecasts are created by TOC meteorologists and have details broken down in 3 hours increments up to 24 hours in advance.

The Weather Stations display graphs and data for what to expect concerning temperature, wind, dew point etc.

The Weather Stations option displays graphs and data directly from RWIS around the state. This includes temperature, wind, dew point, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The final portion of the app includes Mountain Passes. Mountain Passes are often impacted first by incoming weather. To help travelers understand what they will encounter in these areas we have consolidated them into one part of the app.

 A list of all the mountain passes in Utah are available in this section of the app.

A list of all the mountain passes in Utah are available in this section of the app.

Once a mountain pass is selected information with cameras and weather is available.

Once a mountain pass is selected information specific to that area, including cameras and weather forecasts, are available.

A camera view of Sardine Summit mountain pass.

A camera view of Sardine Summit mountain pass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are some tips and tricks to navigating UDOT ‘s Traffic App. The application is available for iPhone and Android devices and can be downloaded for free through your smart phone’s app store.  For more information on how UDOT receives data and traffic information check out this blog written about UDOT’s  Traffic Operations Center. http://blog.udot.utah.gov/2013/06/optimizing-mobility-udots-traffic-management-division/