Tag Archives: Structures

#WorkForUsWednesday for 2/3/2016

We’ve got a fresh batch of new openings for #WorkForUsWednesday! They come from just about every region in the state, and are from a variety of fields. We even have an internship this week!

You’ll have to go to the Utah State Jobs website to actually apply for those jobs. Simply filter the search criteria by department to (810) Department of Transportation, and you’ll be on your way.

Remember, some of last week’s jobs might still be open, so it’s best to check to see if there’s still the position right for you. Happy applying!

 

071515 NSTI Tour the Point

Recruitment #07593 – Electronic Technical Specialist II, R-1 Ogden
Opens 02/2/2016, Closes 02/15/2016
This is a journey level electronics technical specialist position performing complex electronics tasks. This position develops and implements a routine maintenance of traffic equipment, provides signal system repairs, inspects new signal construction, repairs various types of damaged vehicle and pedestrian detectors.

Recruitment #07626 – Transportation Technician II, R-4 Gunnison
Opens 02/3/2016, Closes 02/10/2016
Employees in this job perform difficult highway construction, maintenance or incident prevention tasks to insure safety and provide a consistent flow of traffic along major traffic routes.

Recruitment #07567 – Bridge Management Intern (Engineer Intern) Complex – Structures
Opens 1/28/16, Closes 2/4/16
Incumbent assists UDOT Structures staff in a variety of activities including bridge inspections, running bridge queries, and tracking information. This position will also assist with bridge collisions, providing training, and damage inspections. Incumbent will work with the Bridge Management Engineer, the Hydraulic Design Engineer and the Structures design group on several projects. This position is open to current civil engineering students. A letter from the College of Engineering must be uploaded to your profile no later than the closing date. 

Recruitment #07586 – Senior Leader’s Assistant (Administrative Assistant), Calvin Rampton Complex
Project Development Admin – Opens 1/29/16, Closes 2/5/16
This position reports to, and has a close and confidential relationship to the Project Development Director. Duties are not part of the general agency workload, but are exclusively in support of the director. The successful applicant is required to have senior level knowledge of agency policies, procedures, practices and office skills. Works independently and provides administrative support for a major statewide program.
Recruitment #07564 – Structures Project Engineer – Construction (EM I), Calvin Rampton Complex – Structures
Opens 1/29/16, Closes 2/16/16
The Structures Project Engineer – Construction provides leadership and guidance relating to structures design and construction activities within the Structures Division.   The Structures Construction Engineer works at the central UDOT office, in the Structures Design group and coordinates efforts with the Materials, Maintenance, and Construction groups.  This individual is assigned to work as a structure specialist to provide technical information and support to region customers in the construction and repair of structural elements.

To Corrode or Not to Corrode, a GFRP Question: GFRP Reinforcing Bars in Concrete Columns

Concrete bridge structures are typically designed to last 50 to 75 years, but seldom last half that time before needing major rehabilitation, due to degradation caused by corrosion of steel reinforcement similar to that shown in Fig. 1. Corrosion in commonly used epoxy-coated steel bars has raised concern with its use and has raised interest in the use of alternative reinforcement like fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars. Glass FRP (GFRP) bars are a cost-competitive alternative to epoxy-coated steel bars and have been found to not corrode (see UDOT Report No. UT-11.16).

Photo of bridge columns showing corrosion

Fig. 1. Typical corrosion found on bridge structures

Many transportation costs and user impacts associated with typical corrosion problems could be potentially eliminated with a proactive approach of using non-corrosive reinforcement (e.g. GFRP) in the original construction of concrete elements. Experimental tests were conducted recently at the University of Utah on circular concrete columns reinforced with GFRP and/or steel longitudinal bars and GFRP confining spirals to evaluate their behavior and viability as a potential construction alternative.

One set of columns was reinforced with GFRP spirals and GFRP longitudinal bars, another set of columns was reinforced with GFRP spirals and steel longitudinal bars, and a final set of columns was reinforced with double GFRP spirals and a combination of GFRP and steel longitudinal bars (see Fig. 2). Tests were performed on 12 in. diameter short (3 ft tall) and slender (12 ft tall) columns. These are the only tests known to the authors which have investigated the stability of slender FRP-reinforced concrete columns.

Photo of GFRP columns

Fig. 2. GFRP reinforcement using in column tests.

An analytical confinement and buckling model was developed and validated against the tests to provide a means to predict the behavior and capacity of FRP-reinforced concrete columns. This enabled the analysis of additional reinforcement scenarios utilizing FRP (glass or carbon) longitudinal bars and spirals.

In general it was found that FRP spirals and FRP longitudinal bars can be a viable method of reinforcement for concrete columns, particularly in corrosive environments. FRP spirals, however, need to be placed at a closer pitch spacing to provide confinement levels similar to steel spirals due to the lower modulus of elasticity of FRP composites. On the other hand, FRP longitudinal bars can provide increased deflection capacity as compared with steel bars due to the higher tensile capacity of FRP composites.

Additional research is needed to better quantify the confining capacity of FRP spirals and the required pitch spacing needed. Also research investigating the behavior of FRP-reinforced columns under seismic loading will be an important consideration.

This guest post was written by Thomas A. Hales, PhD, SE with the UDOT Research Division and Chris P. Pantelides, PhD, SE with the University of Utah and was originally published in the UDOT Research Newsletter.

2012 Employee of the Year Nominees

It is spring and here at UDOT that means we have an opportunity to honor a few of our great employees. These individuals have been nominated by their co-workers and selected by senior leaders to receive recognition for their truly fantastic efforts. One individual will be selected as our Employee of the Year which will be announced Tuesday, March 19. And, the nominees are:

  • Adam Anderson — Operations Motor Carrier Division
  • Kristi Barney — Administration Comptroller’s Office
  • Marci Brunson — Region Four Administrative Services
  • Jim Harris — Region One Roadway Maintenance
  • Dave Kelley — Region Two Maintenance
  • Mike Romero — Project Development Structures Division
  • Kristi Urry — Systems Planning and Programming Program Financing
  • Clayton Weaver — Region Three Construction

If you work with any of these folks, or just happen to run into them, be sure to pass along your congratulations. We are lucky to have them as part of our Department!