Tag Archives: rest area

Brian Quarnberg and Colton Peterson Silver Barrel Awards

Photo of UDOT and Region leadership with Brian and Colton.Colton Peterson is assigned to the Salina Maintenance Station but was asked by his supervisor, Brian Quarnberg, to help with facility management within Region 4 since he has previous work experience in this arena. Brian had the foresight to notice the building maintenance needs within the Region and immediately offered Colton’s services. Colton accepted the challenge and worked tirelessly in getting the buildings in the best shape possible for the Division of Facilities Construction and Management (DFCM) inspections.

As a result of Brian’s unselfish attitude and Colton’s efforts the Oak Springs Rest Area on S.R. 24 near Fish Lake and the Pines Rest Area on S.R. 12 near Bryce Canyon have been improved, refurbished and were ready for opening. The Hoover’s Rest Area on U.S. 89 near Marysvale has been painted and refurbished and handed over to the new facility management contractors. Many region upgrades have been put in place thanks to Colton and the new facilities coordinator has been trained on UDOT procedures and systems.

Brian and Colton have shown themselves to be an example to others in regards to UDOT’s strategic goals, and Region 4 would certainly have experienced budget issues without their leadership and team work.

This guest post is from the Silver Barrel Award nominations written by Tim Walden, Region 4 Administrative Services Manager.


UDOT’s Tie Fork Rest Area is the People’s Choice in the American Institute of Architects annual recognition of beautiful buildings.

Tie Fork

With over 400 votes, Tie Fork won in an online competition hosted by the Salt Lake Tribune that let readers vote for their favorite building.

Thanks all who voted for Tie Fork!

For more information about the building, see two previous blog posts, one about online voting and one about the community effort behind the project.

KSL coverd the story about the award too:

Video Courtesy of KSL.com


UDOT’s brand new rest stop echoes Tucker’s railroad past.

Dave Babcock, Fleet Manager in UDOT Region 4’s Price Office wrote this article about UDOT’s newest rest area.

A railroad servicing area in the town of Tucker, Utah. This photo shows a coal bunker and stored coal, left, and a water tank, right. Click on the photo to enlarge. (Used by permission, Utah State Historical Society, all rights reserved.)

The Utah Department of Transportation has constructed a new Safety Rest Area and Visitor Center on US-6 at Milepost 202, at a location known as Tie Fork.  The new facility was a concept and design to pay tribute to the town of Tucker and also to the history of the railroad heritage from the Soldier Summit and Helper areas.

The town of Tucker, Utah, which was 2 miles south of Tie Fork, existed from the early 1900’s to about 1915, and was in it’s prime in about 1910, when over 200 residents called Tucker home.  Tucker was built because of a railroad spur toPleasant Valley.  The narrow gauge rail went directly south from Tucker and served the coal mines in the Scofield and Pleasant Valley areas.

Tucker Rest area (Milepost 204) was built in 1969 and served travelers for 40 years.      In 2009, the Tucker Rest area was removed to allow a highway safety project to be constructed.  At that time, the Tie Fork site was selected for the new rest area.

The UDOT concept team felt it was important to build the restroom and visitor center to resemble a train depot of the early 1900’s.  They also felt that a locomotive roundhouse look would be appropriate for the information kiosks and picnic table area.  Once this design was accepted, the idea of placing a locomotive on site was suggested. After exploring different possibilities, Original Creations was hired to build a replica of a 1900’s steam locomotive, which is proudly displayed on site.

Tie Fork Rest Area under construction -- the design of the building resembles a a locomotive roundhouse

Tie Fork will serve the travelers of US-6 for many years to come.  It will give them an opportunity to safely rest for 10 or 15  minutes, making the US-6 highway corridor a safer place for all.