Tag Archives: Redwood Road

New Bangerter Bridge to open May 17

For motorists in the southwest part of the Salt Lake Valley, the long-awaited day is here: The Bangerter Bridge over Redwood Road will be opening to east-west traffic this Sunday afternoon, May 17.

Starting on Saturday at 11 p.m., traffic on Bangerter Highway will be reduced to one lane while crews switch the traffic onto the new bridge, so watch for changing traffic patterns that night. Motorists wanting to access Redwood Road from the highway (and vice versa) will continue to use the temporary road at Marketview Drive.

This graphic shows how traffic will be affected by the opening of the Bangerter bridge at Redwood Road.

This graphic shows how traffic will be affected by the opening of the Bangerter bridge at Redwood Road. Click on the image to increase its size.

City officials in the area will be taking a tour to see the new bridge on Friday, May 15th at 10 a.m.

The community surrounding Bangerter and Redwood Road is continuing to grow at an accelerated pace, and we’re excited about the improvements the project has made to the area. The project will accommodate immediate and long-term traffic demands and increase mobility, thanks to a grade separated single point urban interchange. The SPUI will improve safety for motorists and bikers in the area by reducing the amount of conflict points.

While the opening of the bridge, which is similar to the bridge at Bangerter and 7800 South in West Jordan, is a major milestone in the Redwood and Bangerter project, it is not the end.  Work on Redwood Road, and signing and landscaping the project, will push the actual construction end day to July.

Unified Police and Fire Conduct SWAT and Training Exercises at Homes Slated for Demolition

Photo of emergency responders outside abandoned houseOn Tuesday, July 8, 2014, the Unified Police and Fire Departments took advantage of a special offer and did what came naturally: knocked down doors, set off smoke grenades and shattered windows.

UDOT Region Two’s Bangerter & Redwood Road Interchange Improvement Project invited both the Unified Police and Fire Departments to conduct SWAT and rescue response exercises at vacant homes scheduled for demolition. The vacant homes allowed for Unified Police and Fire to create real-life scenarios and practice response methods in the event of an emergency.

More than 60 individuals participated in these training exercises. Decked out in full gear in 90-degree heat, Unified Police engaged in tactical training while Unified Fire simulated rescue efforts for individuals trapped in a home during a fire.

Photo of SWAT outside abandoned home“We recognized an opportunity to partner with Unified Police and Fire in a unique way. They make a great contribution in keeping our communities safe and we were happy to be able to support that,” said Marwan Farah, UDOT Region Two Resident Engineer.

The vacant homes had been acquired by UDOT in order to accommodate road widening for the Bangerter & Redwood Road project. Region Two is constructing a grade-separated single-point urban interchange (SPUI) for the intersection at Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road. Construction will be complete in spring 2015.

This guest post was taken from the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Raising Bangerter

Map of the temporary road

Crews have opened a new, temporary road that will move the majority of traffic out of the work zone and away from construction activities.

As part of a proactive effort to address immediate and long-term traffic needs, we are currently constructing improvements at Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road. This $42 million project includes a grade-separated single point urban interchange (SPUI) similar to the interchange of 7800 South and Bangerter Highway.

“We’re excited for the arrival of an interchange in this location,” said UDOT Region Two District Engineer Troy Peterson. “The communities located in the south valley of Salt Lake County continue to grow at an accelerated pace and these improvements are part of a long-range plan to accommodate immediate and future traffic demands. We will also increase mobility and improve safety for those commuting through the area by reducing conflict points.”

Schedule – Since the project received funding in September 2013, we have operated on an accelerated time table. The environmental study was conducted in fall 2013, Wadsworth Brothers Construction was selected as the contractor in April 2014 and construction began shortly after in June. The project will be complete in spring 2015.

The aggressive schedule has become the cornerstone for the project and has fostered an innovative approach. Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road are vital commuter routes and serve a large residential population with an emerging commercial area.

According to Resident Engineer Marwan Farah, “We have many stakeholder groups who will be impacted by construction activities and because of this we placed a high value on building the new freeway-style interchange as efficiently as possible. The project has many challenges to overcome, but we are finding ways to stick to our goals and meet milestones within the allotted timeframe.”

Innovation – In order to complete construction by spring 2015, innovative steps are being implemented. Perhaps the most unique approach is the introduction of a new, temporary road located at 13920 South (also known as Market View Drive) about a half block south of the Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road intersection. 13920 South was an access road to The Bluffs Apartments, which has been expanded to provide a direct east-west connection between Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road. During construction, many of the intersection’s turn movements have been relocated to the new, temporary road and Bangerter Highway’s through traffic has been shifted to the outside lanes. This allows the contractor to build the grade-separated overpass and accompanying tie-ins quicker because the majority of traffic is removed from the work zone.

As part of the new, temporary road, a temporary continuous flow intersection (CFI) has been constructed on Bangerter Highway, which will be in place until project completion. The temporary CFI has a traffic signal and dedicated turn lanes at Bangerter Highway, which provide direct access to the temporary road.

Another innovation that was implemented is the introduction of the Lump Sum Relocation Program, which allowed for residents of properties being purchased for the project to receive relocation monetary benefits in one payment. This program for Right-of-Way relocation was piloted on Bangerter Highway and Redwood Road to determine if it would assist in expediting the project’s relocation needs and overall schedule.

“We have been very happy with the Lump Sum Relocation Program on this project. Overall, it was productive, efficient, lowered costs and saved time,” said Farah.

Public Involvement – Even with innovation like the temporary road, not all impacts can be eliminated through construction. The project team is committed to completing the project with as little inconvenience to the public as possible. We have a robust public involvement approach to connect with drivers and stakeholders impacted by the project. Outreach efforts have included public meetings, mailer and flier distribution, media coverage, city presentations, in-person meetings and a dedicated project website, email and hotline. Our public involvement team has worked closely with the project team and contractor to understand the needs and benefits of the project and how best to communicate them to the public.

Both Bluffdale and Riverton cities have expressed deep appreciation for the planned improvements and the contribution it will make to their communities. They see this as a major step to continued development in the area. According to Riverton City Mayor Bill Applegarth, “This project is a significant improvement that will help increase efficiency and ease of travel for our growing population and people who commute through the southwest valley. UDOT’s preparation and communication regarding this project, as well as many others, has been extremely helpful.”

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Automated Queue Warning Detection System in the Work Zone

Prepare to Stop VMSThis summer, Region Two began work on Redwood Road from I-80 to North Temple to rotomill and resurface the roadway with a thin bonded PCCP 6” overlay. One of the biggest challenges on the job was maintaining traffic through the work zone while also maintaining side-street and business access. This issue was complicated by the high number of large trucks in the area. These trucks not only utilize a significant amount of available queue space on the ramps, they also take more time to climb the incline at the interchange before clearing the signal. These factors required significant coordination to keep traffic moving.

Our contractor, Dry Creek Structures, and construction crew worked closely with the Traffic Signal Maintenance group to split phase signals and move detection zones to accommodate traffic through the work zone. We also worked closely with Grant Farnsworth at the TOC Traffic Signals Desk to adjust signal timing as the work zone configuration changed.

From a traffic safety perspective, our top priority was to minimize queuing on the
westbound I-80 ramp and prevent stopped traffic on mainline I-80. Despite the team’s best efforts, traffic was occasionally still backing onto mainline I-80 while waiting to exit at Redwood Road. To help address this queuing problem, working with Marge Rasmussen in Region Two Traffic and Safety, and Project Manager Peter
Tang, an Automated Queue Warning Detection System was change ordered into
the project and installed on the I-80 westbound off-ramp to Redwood Road.
With this system, the occupancy rate was monitored near the gore point of the off-ramp. When the system detected stopped cars at this location, a warning message was activated at a Variable Message Sign (VMS) upstream of the off-ramp alerting motorists of “STOPPED TRAFFIC AHEAD” and “PREPARE TO STOP.”

How it works: A sub-contracted vendor (Ver-Mac) installed a radar sensor, cellular
modem and solar panel on a highway lighting pole near the bottom of the off
ramp. They also placed a VMS equipped with a cellular modem upstream of the off
ramp. When the vendor’s software system (Jam-Logic) detected an occupancy rate greater than 10 percent at this location, a message was activated at the VMS alerting travelers to the stopped condition ahead. Once the queued traffic had dissipated, the VMS message was automatically turned off and remained off until ramp queuing was detected again.

In addition to the VMS message activating when a queue was detected, email messages were also sent to the TOC Operators, the Signal Timing Engineer and the Resident Engineer, alerting them to the situation. When possible, adjustments were made to the signal timing to help clear the ramp traffic.

Results: The project team is not aware of any accidents at this location after the automated queue warning system was installed. Typically, the system was activated 10 times each day throughout the week or an average of 13.4 times on weekdays. Even during low traffic volumes, just a few long trucks on the ramp can back up traffic and activate the system. While the system was live, the queue warning messages were displayed 256 times for a total of 2,327 minutes. The average display time was 9 minutes. The maximum display time was 56 minutes (on August 23 starting at 9:19 a.m.).

Logical Automation Rules Chart“Doing advanced queue warning is a great operational benefit, but what the TOC appreciated most was the communication between the project and the control room. When the control room knows what’s going on, we’ll help out in any way that we can. In this case, we monitored the queue system and helped ensure that it was functioning as advertised – which it was,” explained Glenn Blackwelder, Traffic Operations Engineer.

Future Applications: The automated queue warning detection system was a valuable addition to our “tool box” for managing traffic issues in the construction work zone on the Redwood Road project. In the future, perhaps other projects could benefit from this or other types of technology to help address traffic control issues within construction work zones.

This guest post was written by Bryan Chamberlain, Region Two Resident Engineer, and was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Integrated Transportation Improvements on Redwood Road

UDOT Region 2 will complete five maintenance projects on state Route 68 (Redwood Road) between S.R. 201 and the Davis County line during the 2013-2015 construction seasons. When complete, these projects will integrate different transportation options to create an improved corridor for all road users including motor vehicles, pedestrians, and cyclists. A dedicated bike lane will span from S.R. 201 to North Temple and shared shoulders will allow more room for cyclists between North Temple and the Davis County line. The projects all reconstructed pedestrian ramps to meet current standards and radar detection has or will be added at several intersections. These improved project features increase safety, and allow for better traffic flow and access to transit and trails in northern Salt Lake County.

Photo of traffic on Redwood Road with a bike lane

Redwood Road near 500 North

UDOT is partnering with municipalities across the state to improve facilities and make more integrated transportation choices available to the traveling public. UDOT has worked closely with Salt Lake City’s Transportation Division throughout all phases of the S.R. 68 projects to include these improvements. According to Becka Roolf, Salt Lake City’s Bicycle/Pedestrian Coordinator, “having people be able to walk and bike, take public transportation, and/or drive are all part of the transportation choices for a city. UDOT has been a great partner on improving those choices.” UDOT is proud to implement strategies that improve safety and increase mobility to develop a world-class roadway network for all transportation users.

On the S.R. 68; I-80 to California Avenue project, Salt Lake City’s request was received later in the design process, requiring some re-design in order to accomplish the bike lane changes necessary. The team determined that integrated transportation was a high priority for the S.R. 68 corridor and were able to incorporate Salt Lake City design requests and still advertise the project on-time. Two other projects on S.R. 68 between S.R. 201 and California Avenue and between 250 South and 1000 North benefited from this decision and were able to coordinate with the City early to include these added features without any impacts to their design schedules.

During construction, the S.R. 68; I-80 to California Avenue project installed the new radar traffic detection system at the onset of construction so that it could be used to maintain traffic flow on S.R. 68 during construction. It had the added benefit of providing bicycle detection in an area that is heavily used by commuter and recreational cyclists alike. Project Manager Lisa Zundel explains that bike lanes “are a benefit for all road users because they separate slower moving cyclists from the motor vehicle traffic,” improving traffic flow across the facility. “UDOT’s improved radar system can detect bicycles in the roadway or bike lanes and give them the opportunity to have a green light,” she added.

Image showing the radard detection zone for cyclistsUDOT is reaching out to the cycling community to explain how radar detection works and to help cyclists position themselves appropriately in an intersection where radar is present. “In order to be detected by radar, cyclists need to be in a through or left-turn lane, behind the stop bar or near a painted bicycle symbol if one is present,” explained Robert Clayton, Director of the UDOT Traffic Operations Center. This positioning removes potential conflict between cyclists and right-turning vehicles at the intersection and triggers the radar if no motor vehicles are present. This will increase safety for cyclists at intersections and improve traffic flow throughout the system.

This guest post was written by the Redwood Road Project Team.

Bangerter Highway & Redwood Road Project Underway

Google map view of the Redwood Road and Bangerter IntersectionAs part of a proactive effort to address the immediate and long-term traffic needs on Bangerter Highway, UDOT is constructing a grade-separated interchange at the Redwood Road intersection from spring 2014 to spring 2015. This project will significantly enhance the public’s overall driving experience at the intersection, allowing for increased mobility, improved safety and a smoother ride. The interchange will be similar to the one constructed in 2012 over 7800 South and Bangerter Highway.

UDOT Region Two completed an environmental study on the intersection last winter in order to determine the best concept to fit the area’s traffic needs. UDOT has also been actively working with Bluffdale and Riverton city leaders, residents, businesses and property owners, to explain the value of the project and prepare the community for the upcoming project. The project is expected to support development and economic growth in the area as one of UDOT’s top goals to strengthen the economy.

UDOT recently selected Wadsworth Brothers Constructors as the contractor on the project. Wadsworth Brothers offers an aggressive construction schedule and places high value on minimizing traffic impacts as much as possible. Whenever we embark on a new project, one of our main priorities is to get in and get out with as little inconvenience to the public as possible. At the same time, we also want to deliver a quality product to the community in order to make it worth their time and effort. I’m confident that Wadsworth Brothers will fulfill both of these goals.

Commuters can expect light construction activity in the spring with the main construction effort building momentum in mid-July. Crews will narrow lanes, implement traffic shifts and build a temporary lane to maintain traffic capacity while construction efforts are underway. Crews will also implement paving operations, utility relocations, and landscape and aesthetic improvements.

During construction, our public involvement team encourages the public to visit the project website for updates and information regarding anticipated impacts. The project has a dedicated website, email and hotline already active for questions, and has been regularly meeting with stakeholders to keep them informed. UDOT and Wadsworth Brothers will also be hosting a “Meet the Contractor” night to give community members an opportunity to learn more about the project and construction schedule.

This is a guest post written by UDOT Region 2 District Engineer Troy Peterson.