Tag Archives: public involvement

New Mobile App: UDOT Click ‘n Fix

Photo of iPhone Click 'n Fix appDid you know that 630 UDOT maintenance employees take care of nearly 6,000 miles of highway around Utah? It’s true, and they do an excellent job of finding and fixing issues before most of us even notice. However, with that many roads, we can help them by keeping an eye out for problems and letting them know about it. To make submitting service requests as easy as possible, we’ve implemented a new iPhone and Android app called UDOT Click ‘n Fix.

UDOT Click ‘n Fix allows anyone to report an issue by dropping a pin on a map at the location of the problem. It also allows others to see everything that has been reported and to add their own comments or follow the issue to receive notifications.

Once the location is selected Click ‘n Fix asks a few follow up questions to help crews understand what needs to be fixed. Submitted issues are sent to UDOT crews and a response is posted as soon as possible.

Keep in mind, UDOT will only be able to help with issues on federal interstates and state highways like Bangerter Highway (S.R. 154) and State Street (U.S. 89). Also, while safety is our top priority, this tool is for non-emergency purposes.

To use UDOT Click ‘n Fix, download the iPhone or Android app or visit the UDOT website and use the embedded widget.

See the desktop tutorial:

See a mobile tutorial at KUTV.com:


A good public meeting facilitates information flow between UDOT and stakeholders.

Does this bug you? Evelyn Tuddenham organized a training on how to avoid holding a bad public meeting. The boards were bad on purpose, especially this one featuring the Mormon Cricket.

Showing how not to receive public comments, Angela Linford of Wilkinson Ferrari holds a bowl full of torn pieces of paper.

In a calculated attempt to show what not to do, a team of UDOT communicators took a cue from a 90’s rock and roll song and decided to be “Cruel to be Kind” with a training that imitated a bad public meeting.

Attendees stood in a long line, saw vague and confusing project posters, and then were ignored or given incomplete or conflicting answers to questions by fake project staff.

After the fun but frustrating demonstration, a panel discussion and question and answer session set everyone straight about how to avoid a public meeting fiasco.

The outcome of the training is a list,Public Meeting Dos and Don’ts, with tips from attendees and panel members who are experts at organizing public meetings the right way.