Tag Archives: Planning

#WorkForUsWednesday for 2/17/2016

We’re a little behind on #WorkForUsWednesday, so here’s two weeks worth of jobs in every region in Utah, and in a variety of fields.

You’ll have to go to the Utah State Jobs website to actually apply for those jobs. Simply filter the search criteria by department to (810) Department of Transportation, and you’ll be on your way.

Remember, some of last week’s jobs might still be open, so it’s best to check to see if there’s still the position right for you. Happy applying!

Dave Asay 17 copy

Recruitment #07474 – Survey Technician IV (Engineering Technician IV), R-4 Richfield
Opens 02/3/2016, Closes 02/17/2016
The Survey Technician works under the direction of a Registered Land Surveyor. The purpose of this position is to perform various surveying support duties

Recruitment #07560 – Rotational Engineer (Engineer II), Multiple Locations (Ogden, Salt Lake, Orem, & Richfield)
Opens 2/8/16, Closes 3/3/16
This is an entry-level job, which requires close supervision and limited engineering experience while performing engineering related tasks. Incumbents exercise limited judgment and all assignments are screened for difficult or unusual circumstances. Engineering functions may include design, materials, hydraulics, planning, right-of-way, structures, traffic, transportation, field office, location, construction, natural resources and environmental activities.

Recruitment #07260 – ROW Property Manager (Program Manager), Complex – Right of Way
Opens 2/10/16, Closes 2/24/16
This position is responsible for the oversight and development of the Right of Way (ROW) Property Program.  The successful applicant will make recommendations to the Director of Right of Way concerning the accuracy and completion of Right of Way documents relative to the transfer of property to be acquired or disposed of by UDOT.

Recruitment #07720 – Right of Way Accountant (Financial Analyst III), Complex – Comptroller’s Office
Opens 2/11/16, Closes 2/18/16
This is a senior level job which may also be used as a supervisory position. A thorough knowledge of pertinent policies and procedures is required to manage a financial segment of a high volume, complex agency. This job requires advanced skill in utilizing and interfacing computerized financial systems as well as an understanding of system behavior related to unusual or specific circumstances.

Recruitment #07717 – Active Transportation Manager (Program Manager), Complex – Planning
Opens 2/12/16, Closes 2/22/16
Under the guidance of UDOT Planning and the UDOT TravelWise program,  the main focus of this position is to support the UDOT Regions and work closely with our transportation partners, MPO’s, UTA, and local governments.

Recruitment #07731 – Port of Entry Agent (Motor Carrier Specialist II), Peerless, UT
Opens 2/16/16, Closes 2/23/16
Incumbent will check required credentials including MCS-150 applications, CDL, medical card, and Unified Carrier Registration, check vehicle and load documentation including registrations, Driver Vehicle Examination reports, and required fuel and load permits.

Recruitment #07689 – Transportation Technician II, Sevier County
Opens 2/16/16, Closes 3/01/16
Employees in this job perform difficult highway construction, maintenance or incident prevention tasks to insure safety and provide a consistent flow of traffic along major traffic routes.

UDOT seeks public comment on Draft 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) has prepared the Draft 2040 Long Range Transportation Plan (LRP), and is requesting public comment on it.

The State of Utah has a 30-year plan in urban and rural areas. The LRP is what guides transportation system improvements on State and Federal highways in rural Utah. The plan provides an assessment of future area transportation needs, along with future transportation investment recommendations. It is developed in accordance with federal regulations and updated every four years.

UDOT Urban Planning Manager Walter Steinvorth said public input is essential on the LRP.

“Not only does it build stronger bridges between the Department and rural Utah, but it also gives residents a chance to identify projects that are important to them that could possibly get overlooked.” Steinvorth said.

Not only is the LRP important for people who live in rural Utah, but it also important for the public who vacation in the area, and for those who transport goods in and through the state. While UDOT welcomes public comment from all citizens, Steinvorth stressed the great need for those in under-represented parts of the population to let the department know of their concerns.

“We collect an awful lot of data. That data and analysis doesn’t always give us the full picture,” Steinvorth said.  “We need our citizens and users to help us find what is important to them in their community.”

The Draft 2040 LRP will be available for review at http://udot.utah.gov/go/lrp from March 1, 2015, through April 30, 2015. Comments may be directed to planning@utah.gov or submitted through the comment application at the listed website.

A gallery of maps shed light on STIP process

The STIP Workshop Gallery, now available through UPlan, enhances planning, decision-making and transparency.

The projects on the map are showing UDOT’s Statewide Transportation Improvement Program, or STIP, a four-year plan of funded state and local projects for the State of Utah.

The STIP is updated and published annually after a yearlong cycle of events that includes input from other government agencies, fiscal analysis, and public meetings and comments. The STIP serves as UDOT’s official work plan for developing projects from conception, through design, to advertising and construction.

A screen shot of Region One's STIP map gives the public a look the status of projects and how much is being spent.

A screen shot of Region One’s STIP map gives the public a look the status of projects and how much is being spent.

Before UDOT’s GIS team produced maps showing the STIP, the list of projects were published as static hard-copy maps or as a list of projects. The new STIP maps are web-based and dynamic, and change as UDOT makes changes to the program. The data on the maps are obtained from ePM, UDOT’s electric program management system, and are refreshed nightly.

Policy makers, program managers and the public

The maps will be used at the Utah Transportation Commission Workshop in April. “It gives them a view of the planned and recommended projects in the regions they represent,” says William Lawrence, UDOT Director of Program Finance. Lawrence will use the maps to zoom in to see the exact location, scope, planned schedule and budget of each project at the workshop.

The maps help “open a conversation up among groups at UDOT,” says Lawrence. Portfolio and project managers can use the maps to coordinate or combine projects. For example, a bridge program manager and a pavement program manager can coordinate projects to reduce impact to the public.

The maps help UDOT’s goal to be a transparent public agency. “In a nutshell, it basically says here’s the funding we have and here’s where we’ve planned to spend it,” says Lawrence. It lets the public see “exactly what’s coming in their direction.”

To find the maps, start from the UPlan Map Center website, enter STIP in the search field and select “search for apps” in the drop down box.

This post was written by Catherine Higgins of the UDOT Project Development division. It will also appear in the GIS bi-monthly newsletter.

Mountain Accord: Shaping the Future of the Central Wasatch

Photo of Wasatch MountainsMountain Accord is a public process initiated to gather input from local residents and stakeholders and make long-term decisions regarding the future of the central Wasatch Mountains. By using public input and previous research as a framework, the project team and active participants are evaluating four major topic areas and how they relate to each other in the central Wasatch region: transportation, environment, recreation and economy.

Mountain Accord is made up of more than 20 diverse organizations including local, state and federal government entities, members of the local business community and several non-profit organizations. Region Two Director Nathan Lee is representing UDOT on the Mountain Accord Executive Board that was formed to provide consensus-based oversight, solicit funding, resolve disputes, approve recommendations, and set the overall program direction and policy.

The Mountain Accord process consists of two principle phases. Phase one began in January 2014. Since then, small stakeholder working groups have been studying current and projected future conditions within the study area in Salt Lake, Summit, and Wasatch counties. The process is drawing from continuous public input, existing plans and studies, and collaboration among Mountain Accord’s participating agencies and key stakeholders.

Several Region Two officials participate in these working groups and are using this information to develop potential future scenarios for the central Wasatch Mountains and canyons that address transportation, environment, recreation and economic goals. These alternatives are scheduled to be open for public review and input in December, with public open houses scheduled for early January. Phase one will culminate in the selection of a preferred scenario and specific actions for each of the four areas of interest.

During Phase Two, the Mountain Accord project team will work through appropriate agencies and entities to implement these proposed actions. For more information about Mountain Accord and how you can get involved in this important process to shape the future of the central Wasatch, visit www.mountainaccord.com.

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.

UDOT Participated in MAG Transportation Fairs

MAG Transportation FairMountainland Association of Governments held its annual Transportation and Community Planning Fairs during October.

MAG invited member cities to provide information about community plans and utilized the fairs to invite public input on the Draft Regional Transportation Plan.

UDOT participated by providing information about upcoming construction on The Point project, seat belt safety highlighted by the Zero Fatalities team, and TravelWise information. Region Three displayed their Interactive Projects map and a looping video using photos from the 2014 photo contest. They also shared information about the region bike plan and invited response to a quick questionnaire to help prioritize potential bike projects.

MAG is launching an interactive website called Exchanging Ideas as part of the Regional Transportation Planning process. Kory Iman, GIS Analyst with Region Three and MAG, had an integral role in developing the site to facilitate public input. MAG staff demonstrated the site at the three fairs in October and will accept comment through April 2015.

This guest post was orginally published in the Region Three Fall 2014 Newsletter.

Consider a Map

Online maps are serving as great communication tools for UDOT Planning’s efforts to develop and improve facilities for pedestrians and cyclists.

A coordinated active transportation network for pedestrians and cyclists is an essential part of an integrated transportation system that considers the needs of all users. Recently, UDOT Director Carlos Braceras listed five areas of focus for the agency, and he included integrated transportation:

Photo of Road Respect bicyclists riding in traffic“UDOT will actively consider how to best meet the needs of trucks, bikes, pedestrians and mass transit when studying transportation solutions and ensure those solutions are applied to the most appropriate facilities. We will strive to provide Utahns with balanced transportation options while planning for future travel demand.”

How can UDOT employees meet the challenge of communicating and coordinating with the diverse transportation user groups? One way is by using online maps as communication tools.

“When you have a precise illustration, which a map provides, it gets everyone on the same page by relaying a lot of information in a concise, coordinated way,” says Evelyn Tuddenham, UDOT’s Walking and Biking Coordinator in the planning division. “Maps contain so much information – it allows viewers to see the ebb and flow in ways that you can’t accomplish just by looking at numbers.”

Maps as communication tools can enhance collaboration and help convey a distinct message. Here are some examples of how maps are being used to help plan a coordinated active transportation network:

The Utah Collaborative Active Transportation Study (UCATS) used online maps on an interactive website to show pedestrians and bicyclists existing facilities and then get feedback about where improvements are needed. Study participants used that information to identify a proposed regional bicycle network that will improve and extend the state’s active transportation system by making facilities safer and improving connectivity to transit.

The outcome of the UCATS study will have a huge impact on the active transportation in Utah by identifying needed improvements and systematically planning ways to coordinated and implement active transportation infrastructure.

screenshot of Utah Bike Maps websiteThe UDOT Walking and biking program is using a series of maps to show cyclists existing routes. The map series idea was proposed by Nick Kenczka, Research Consultant in UDOT Systems Planning and programming. Tuddenham resisted the idea at first, thinking that one map would be simpler.

“It turned out to be a great way to talk to cyclists,” Tuddenham says of the series. “Having a set of maps breaks information down and allows us to present the information in a more coherent way.”

Each map has a separate focus and a separate message. Altogether, the series is an effective tool for cyclists with different needs. Recreational cyclists can check out shoulder widths and other infrastructure elements, the difficulty of the terrain and the screen shot of popular rides online maplength of the route to plan trips. Bike commuters can use the maps to see traffic volume information and to check route. Cyclists can even zoom into specific areas on the maps and take a virtual ride down the road to see what they could encounter on a particular route. The maps are useful tools that can help cyclists make informed travel decisions.

Give it a try

Using maps to communicate is easier than you think. The UPlan Map Center, available on the UDOT Data Portal, allows users to build a custom map, or several maps, quickly and easily. Pre-built maps can also be used and changed to suite communication needs.

Combining a series of maps, like the ones used to communicate with cyclists, takes the help of a UDOT eGIS expert. Contact information for the eGIS team is available on the UDOT Data Portal.

More about maps: