Tag Archives: pavement markings

Dan Betts Silver Barrel

Dan Betts received a Silver Barrel Award for his solution to striping problems on I-80 in Parley’s Canyon. After receiving several complaints about low striping visibility Dan and UDOT Central Maintenance determined there was a problem. Dan contacted the manufacturer because the striping was still under warranty and came up with a great solution.

  • The manufacturer would replace the striping tape on I-80 between Mt. Aires Exit 132 and Lambs Canyon Exit 137, including installation and traffic control.
  • The upper section of I-80 from Lambs Canyon Exit 137 to Kimball Junction Exit 145 paint would be applied over the existing striping tape since the pavement is in need of treatment and tape would not be cost effective. The manufacturer would install the paint including the traffic control.
  • UDOT Region Two would provide the grooves for the striping tape to be applied.
  • The manufacturer would provide an additional four year warranty for the entire section, both taped and painted.

Through Dan’s efforts and negotiating skills he was able to improve striping on I-80 through Parley’s Canyon.

This guest post was taken from the Silver Barrel Nomination submitted to the UDOT Administration Office.

Pavement Marking Check-up

Photo of right side white lineRetroreflectivity, which makes pavement markings visible at night, happens when the light from vehicle headlights bounces back toward the driver’s eyes. Visible markings help prevent lane departure crashes. But markings degrade over time due to weather and wear from traffic, so departments of transportation need to keep on top of pavement marking maintenance through regular inspections and replacement of sub-par markings.

Until recently, markings were measured subjectively by just taking a look and rating the condition of the marking. For the past year, however, retroreflectivity has been measured objectively, and data from those measurements is available on UDOT’s Data Portal.

Each spring and fall, employees from UDOT’s Maintenance Planning Division measure the retroreflectivity of markings on a randomly chosen selection of roadway segments, including dashed lane markings and solid lines that mark the edge of the road.

Photo of the van that is used to measure pavement markingMeasurements are taken using a mobile retroreflectometer mounted in a van. The retroreflectometer, shoots a high intensity Laser in a sweeping motion over marked pavement and measures the light that reflects back in milli-candelas per lux per meter squared – a measure of light per unit area.

The data gathered by the measuring effort is compiled and graded from A+ to F – this spring, UDOT got a B. This year’s fall data is in the process of being compiled. The data on UDOT’s Data Portal can be viewed on a map alone or along with other data sets.

Over time, having an objective measurements of pavement retroreflectivity will help support safety by helping to direct funding where improvement is needed.


UDOT’s system for helping to optimize travel on I-15 is working, but some bad driving behaviors really cross the double white lines.


Crossing the double white lines can also land you a hefty fine -- $82.

The good news about UDOT’s new Express Lane system is that it’s working.

Travel time on I-15 is improved when drivers use the Express Lanes. Vehicles with more than one passenger can use the Express Lanes for free. Solo drivers can purchase a pass and pay to use Express Lanes. UDOT manages travel time in the Express Lane by charging pass users a variable rate base on travel speed on I-15.

The smart new system allows vehicles to take up available space in the Express Lanes so travel time on I-15 is better for everyone.  But when drivers  cross the double white lines,  they risk causing a crash. Crossing the double white lines is un-safe practice and illegal for that reason.  Why?

Catherine Cutler is the engineer in charge of letting you know that crossing the double white lines is unsafe and illegal.

“There’s a speed differential between the Express Lanes and the general purpose lanes,” says Catherine Cutler, UDOT Express Lanes Project Manager. “My job is to make sure drivers are aware of how dangerous that practice is. Weaving in and out of the lanes by crossing the double white lines can cause drivers to break suddenly or swerve and cause a crash. ”

The Express Lanes on I-15 have been engineered to be as safe as possible. Double white lines provide a buffer to separate traffic traveling at different speeds from merging unexpectedly while dotted white lines provide an expected point for vehicles to move in and out of the Express Lanes.

Cutler hopes more drivers will be aware of Express Lane safety issues as they see some new billboards along I-15 at 1550 North and 12645 South. If everybody follows the law, drivers can enjoy Express Lane benefits without the risks caused by crossing the double white lines.


UDOT is improving pavement marking visibility at night during storms.

Glass beads and grooving: This image from a UDOT report on improving pavement marking retroreflectivity shows glass beads and reflective beads added to paint. Grooving pavement before applying markings is a way to avoid plow blade wear and tear.

Road users are sometime frustrated when pavement markings are less visible at night during storms — and for good reason. “We realize this issue is a safety concern,” says Ken Berg, UDOT Maintenance Planning Engineer. “Pavement marking visibility is our number one safety priority here in Maintenance all the time, but especially in wet weather and at night.”

Pavement marking visibility can be reduced because of water on the road and wear caused by snow plow blades.

Water interferes with the reflectivity of pavement markings. “Light is refracted in all directions through the water, rather than retro reflected back to the driver,” according to Berg. One way to combat this reflectivity issue is to add profile, or thickness, so markings are visible above the water.

Adding profile can be accomplished by using thicker products or adding glass beads to the paint. However, high profile markings can get scraped off by snow plows. “Thicker markings won’t usually last through the winter,” says Berg. “So, the increased cost of thicker markings isn’t usually justified.”

UDOT is studying ways to counter water and plow blades.

Dan Betts, Region 2 Pavement Marking Coordinator and Berg are developing application methods that can be used by state forces without expensive materials or special equipment. Betts has developed and refined the process of cutting a groove in the pavement so paint is recessed below the surface. Recessed markings are less likely to be worn down by snow plow blades.

In addition to grooving, adding retroreflective glass and ceramic beads to paint improves visibility during wet and dry conditions and at night. Tests done at night confirm the effectiveness of the beads.

For more information, see a report on the process conducted on I-84 in Weber Canyon.