Tag Archives: I-15 CORE

I-15 CORE Selected as National Top-Ten Project; Now Up to Public Vote

I-15 and University Parkway Aerial photo

University Parkway

In August I-15 CORE was picked as one of the top 10 finalists for the 2013 America’s Transportation Award sponsored by the American Association of State and Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO), AAA and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

As a finalist, I-15 CORE is eligible for either the Grand Prize, which is awarded by a panel of judges, or the People’s Choice award, which is based on public voting. The winner receives a $10,000 donation for a local charity, and UDOT has selected United Way of Utah County for the donation. United Way of Utah County works to create lasting improvements in the community in the areas of education, income and health.

To vote, go to the following link, nominate.americastransportationawards.org/voting and select I-15 CORE.  Each person can vote up to 10 times a day through Oct. 2.

I-15 CORE was completed in December 2012 as the fastest billion-dollar highway project built in U.S. history. The project included the widening and reconstruction of 24 miles of I-15 from Lehi to Spanish Fork and was $260 million under budget.

United Way of Utah County seeks to help those most vulnerable in the community, focusing on three areas that are building blocks of a good life: education, income and health.

This is a guest post written by I-15 CORE communications team member Christina Davis.

Update: Thanks to everyone who voted. We didn’t win the people’s choice award but did win the Grand Prize and $10,000 for United Way of Utah County. Congratulations I-15 CORE team and United Way!

I-15 CORE Wins Two Safety Awards

UDOT’s I-15 CORE and Provo River Constructors were recently selected by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association as winners of 2013 Roadway Work Zone Safety Awareness Awards in the local educational campaign and training categories. UDOT won for its campaign on the lane split traffic configurations and PRC won for its overall safety program that included their “Hands-on Safety” outreach.

Lane Splits Outreach Campaign

As part of I-15 CORE construction, the lanes on I-15 in Orem and American Fork were split around the construction zone. The lane splits created a communication and traffic challenge, as drivers would need to know which lanes to use long before they reached the area – so they could either exit or stay on the freeway.

The maintenance of traffic (MOT) and communications teams developed a comprehensive outreach campaign that would raise awareness of the upcoming traffic configuration and provide information on how to safely navigate them and divert at least 20 percent of traffic, to keep the freeway flowing smoothly. The campaign included TV and print news stories, radio advertisements, social media and direct mail. A highlight of the outreach campaign was a clever movie theater ad that played like a romantic-comedy trailer.

In less than one month, over a quarter-of-a-million movie goers saw the movie trailer and more than 8,000 viewed the instructional video the month before the lane splits were in place. As the real sign of success, traffic continued to move smoothly through the construction area while the splits were in place.

PRC’s Hands On Safety Campaign

PRC had to build 24 miles of I-15 in just 35 months, but the I-15 CORE design-builder still made safety its number-one priority.

PRC carried out a comprehensive safety program that all employees adopted in their daily work. All of the nearly 6,000 employees attended a mandatory Project Safety and Railroad Orientation before they could start work. Weekly toolbox safety meetings, monthly “All-Hands” safety meetings, safety pre-planning and pre-shift safety task planning, jobsite inspections, accident investigations, medical treatment management, and tracking of any indicators and trends before and after incident were all required.

Even with all this training, management began seeing a trend of hand injuries among work crews. To reverse this trend, PRC developed and implemented a “Hands-on Safety” program emphasizing pinch point awareness and hand protection guidelines. The program included presentations, posters and a policy change to require gloves to be worn at all times when handling tools and/or materials.

The success of PRC’s work zone safety approach resulted in crews achieving one million workhours without a recordable incident, and one million work-hours without a lost-time incident on four separate occasions.  PRC put in over 7 million work hours to build I-15 CORE and achieved a safety record that was four times better than the national average in the construction industry.

I-15 CORE Receives 2013 Partnered Project of the Year Award

IPI Award

I-15 CORE received the highest partnering award in its category (diamond level).

UDOT and its I-15 CORE partners, Provo River Constructors and partnering facilitator Tom Warne and Associates, were awarded the prestigious International Partnering Institute’s (IPI) John L. Martin Partnered Project of the Year – Diamond Level, at a ceremony in San Francisco, May 16.

“I-15 CORE demonstrated world-class partnering. The team focused on developing a collaborative project and program culture both within the project team and by integrating stakeholders throughout the entire process,” said Rob Reaugh, IPI Executive Director.

The ceremony was comprised of representatives from various state agencies and private companies from across the nation, and contractors, designers and architects and other firms associated with construction, partnering and facilitation.

“For UDOT, partnering is part of our culture and has been for years,” said Todd Jensen, I-15 CORE Project Director. “The partnering process enables decision makers from the Department and the contractor to come together to set common goals and expectations and to discuss openly any issues or challenges and how to overcome them.  It’s a collaborative process that can be difficult and time consuming.  Without a strong commitment to the partnering process, I believe UDOT would not be a national leader in the transportation industry that it is today.”

Springville Paving

Springville – To meet the aggressive construction schedule, crews paved during the summer and winter months. During the winter months, both I-15 CORE and PRC would meet daily to evaluate weather conditions and ensure each new pavement section would be properly protected, heated and monitored before paving could begin.

“In terms of project success, (I-15 CORE) was delivered $260 million under budget, 48 days early and processed more than 125 contract change orders without having a claim, and considering the number of man hours, was pretty successful from a safety standpoint,” Reaugh said.

According to Jensen, the project’s success was predicated on three keys: shared project goals, a commitment to continuous communication and a commitment to both following the formal partnering process and encouraging building relationships through informal partnering at all levels.

“With such a large project and PRC’s aggressive construction schedule, continuous communication was vital. We decided to co-locate the field offices as well as the main office to help foster face-to-face communications. Our priority was to encourage team members to talk with each other face-to-face first, followed by phone calls then email and finally letter,” Jensen said. “It was challenging and it placed people in uncomfortable situations at times, but the results of creating and encouraging a culture of communication speak for themselves.”

Provo RR Girder Placement

Provo – Crews set a steel bridge girder over the Union Pacific Railroad. Much of the construction was done at night to minimize travel delays.

During the initial partnering sessions, leadership from both teams established a shared set of goals of safety, quality, trust, truth and teamwork, budget and profitability, communication, upholding the public trust, schedule and enjoying the process. The leadership team then further defined what each goal meant. This helped keep members focused on what was most important. Like all projects, there were disagreements, differing interpretations of the contract documents, but these were overcome or managed by keeping the project goals at the forefront of employees minds and trying to address issues as quickly as possible.

“As part of our monthly partnering surveys, we required that names be attached to comments. Not to single anyone out but to know where challenges were, so that we could talk with our counterparts and work with that respective group to help get things resolved,” Jensen said.

American Fork 100 EAst

American Fork – Partnering was key in the decision to split the travel lanes on I-15 in Orem and American Fork. UDOT was able to keep lanes open and traffic moving while allowing PRC to finish building the middle sections of I-15.

Another key to success was the emphasis on informal partnering outside of the formal process.

“Relationships can make or break a project. We tried to foster a culture that it was okay to escalate items if the team couldn’t come to a resolution. We encouraged working groups to meet individually and get to know one another on a personal level. Challenges will happen but if you get to know the person across the table, it can help you get issues resolved quickly,” Jensen said.

According to Warne, accountability was the last key to building a successful project.  At each partnering meeting, the participants would discuss issues and develop action plans with responsible parties and timelines identified. In subsequent meetings, an accounting of progress for each action item had to be reported on.

“This team was particularly attentive to addressing the issues. Working together to solve problems and address issues strengthened the team and better prepared them for future challenges. Nothing short of an exceptional level of team work allowed them to deliver this project in record time,” Warne said.

Completed I-15

Pleasant Grove – Because both teams were committed to partnering and established shared project goals, I-15 CORE was completed ahead of schedule and under budget.

Because of the commitment to partnering, I-15 CORE never needed to use the assigned Dispute Resolution Board or the project sponsors to help resolve issues; all the project’s goals were met or exceeded; and a sense of achievement developed among project team members.

For more information about the International Partnering Institute visit: www.partneringinstitute.org.

This guest post was written by I-15 CORE team member Geoff Dupaix.

2013 Strategic Direction — Part 2

This is the second part of a 4 part series about the 2013 Strategic Direction. Please also check out Part 1: Preserve Infrastructure, Part 3: Zero Fatalities and Part 4: Strengthen the Economy.

Optimize Mobility

The goal of optimizing mobility continues to include the need to build new highways, expand existing highways, build more bicycle and pedestrian paths and expand the transit network. UDOT accomplishes this by adding capacity, managing lanes, developing innovative cross roads, coordinating signals, and providing traffic information.

Since 2006, more than 575 lane miles have been added to the state system from various programs that fund more than 100 projects. Currently, capacity projects are primarily funded through the Transportation Investment Fund (TIF). Some of these projects include the I-15 CORE, Mountain View Corridor, US-40 passing lane improvements, SR-18 intersection upgrades at St. George Blvd. and US-6 passing lane improvements. These capacity projects dramatically improve delay on Utah roadways.


Without capacity improvements, delay along the Wasatch Front would have experienced a three-to-five fold increase.

UDOT currently has 124 miles of Express Lanes (62 miles both northbound and southbound) with 54 continuous miles between Spanish Fork and North Salt Lake City making Utah’s Express Lanes the longest continuous Express Lanes in the country. More than 13,000 Express Pass transponders have been purchased, speeds average 9 mph faster than the general lanes and travelers experience a higher level of safety.

Developing and constructing innovative cross roads is a fundamental in optimizing mobility on Utah roadways. Flex Lanes, Commuter Lanes, ThrU-Turn Intersections (TTI), Diverging Diamond Interchanges (DDI) and Continuous Flow Intersections (CFIs) decrease delay at intersections, reduce travel time, improve safety, and reduce the length and cost of construction.

The Traffic Operations Center (TOC) continues to be the key to providing a cost-effective and and efficient solution to help relieve congestion on Utah’s roads and highways. Using advanced technologies such as cameras and traffic/weather sensors, operators in the TOC can monitor traffic, detect problems and take actions necessary to return traffic flow to normal.

UDOT uses a variety of methods to provide actual travel times and accurate traffic and weather information to help drivers make choices that reduce delay, prevent crashes and improve air quality. By implementing an extensive Intelligent Transportation System (ITS), UDOT is able to know what is happening on Utah roads, and provide travelers the information they need to plan their routes. UDOT communicates travel information online at udot.utah.gov and through variable messages signs (VMS), traffic cameras, twitter, facebook, and YouTube, and the UDOT Traffic App.


UDOT marked two significant milestones as it celebrated the completion of the largest road construction projects in Utah history on Saturday, December 15 with the opening of the Utah County I-15 Corridor Expansion (I-15 CORE) and 15 miles of the Mountain View Corridor (MVC) in Salt Lake County.

“We have delivered the World Series and the Super Bowl all in one day,” said UDOT Executive Director John Njord.

Local leaders, including Governor Gary Herbert, House Speaker Becky Lockhart and Senator John Valentine, joined UDOT in cutting the banner on the record-breaking I-15 CORE project Saturday afternoon. More than 100 people braved the chilly December weather to join the festivities. Refreshments including hot chocolate, hot dogs and special I-15 CORE sugar cookies were available to say thank you to the public for their patience throughout construction.

I-15 CORE Ribbon Cutting

I-15 CORE Ribbon Cuttin

“Hear the noise. That’s the sound of progress,” Herbert said, as cars and trucks passed underneath the Sam White Bridge on I-15. “That’s the sound of commerce, that’s the sound of a state that’s really going in the right direction.”

Construction on I-15 CORE was finished in an unprecedented 35 months, making it the fastest billion-dollar public highway project ever built in the United States. The project came in $260 million under budget.

Saturday’s celebration was held on the Sam White Bridge in American Fork, the site of one of the project’s greatest achievements. In March 2011, UDOT moved the bridge — the longest two-span bridge to be moved by self-propelled modular transporters
(SPMTs) in the Western Hemisphere — into place over I-15 in one night.

“The technology to move the Sam White Bridge into place in hours instead of months is indicative of all the work that took place on this project” to complete it quickly and keep traffic moving, Njord said.

I-15 CORE reconstructed 24 miles of freeway from Lehi to Spanish Fork, with two additional freeway lanes in each direction.

Earlier that day, snow flurries didn’t deter over 200 runners who bundled up in their winter gear to attend the MVC opening celebration, which featured a 5K Polar Bear Fun Run to give members of the community an opportunity to enjoy the road before it opened to motorists.

“It looks like Christmas to me,” said Governor Herbert as he spoke to the chilly, but upbeat crowd.

MVC Opening 5K Polar Bear Fun Run

MVC Opening 5K Polar Bear Fun Run

Runners were entertained by music courtesy of the Copper Hills High School Marching Band, stayed warm with the help of hand warmers and MVC beanies and enjoyed holiday treats, hot cider and hot chocolate provided by the project’s contractors.

Representative Wayne Harper and West Jordan Mayor Melissa Johnson also addressed the audience and thanked UDOT for their continued innovation and partnership in developing this vital roadway.

The current phase of MVC is 15 miles long and features two lanes built in each direction from Redwood Road (at approximately 16000 South) to 5400 South, with signalized intersections where future interchanges will be located.

To meet projected transportation demands in the year 2030, future construction will build out the remainder of the corridor by adding interchanges and inside lanes to achieve a fully functional freeway that will connect with I-80 in Salt Lake County and I-15
in Lehi.

Construction funds have been identified to extend MVC from 5400 South to 4100 South in the next few years.

The roadway also features 15 miles of trails adjacent to the corridor, 9 miles of paved bike lanes and UDOT’s first radar activated bike turn signal.

“The vision for the Mountain View Corridor came from the communities in Western Salt Lake County,” said Project Director Teri Newell. “UDOT is proud to make this vision a reality and provide these communities with a new transportation solution.”

MVC provides increased mobility, but will require motorists to adjust their driving patterns and learn how to navigate a new one-way roadway, as this initial phase is similar to a divided highway with one-way northbound and southbound roadways. Signs
are posted along the corridor and at each intersection to help motorists adjust to the new traffic patterns. UDOT has also produced a navigational video to teach motorists how to drive on the new roadway.

Governor Herbert touted the success of both the I-15 CORE and MVC projects, highlighting their importance state. “This is about economic development. If you want a state to thrive economically, you’ve got to have a transportation system that works,” said Herbert.

You can find out more on the I-15 CORE Infographic and the project website, www.udot.utah.gov/i15core. Additional details about the MVC project are available on the MVC Infographic or by logging on to www.udot.utah.gov/mountainview.

This is a guest post by Mary Rice of the Mountain View Corridor Project Team.


UDOT Executive Director John Njord has received an award for his leadership of the I-15 CORE Project.

UDOT Executive Director John Njord, left, with Executive Director of AASHTO, John Horsley.

Njord was honored with the George S. Bartlett Award because of his “outstanding leadership” of the I-15 CORE, a twenty-four mile freeway widening project in Utah County.

The award is given to leaders who make significant contribution to highway construction progress. Njord’s leadership demonstrates his “exceptional contribution to highway development and innovation” according to a Transportation Research Board press release.

Some past recipients include former US Secretaries of Transportation Mary Peters and Norm Mineta; former US Congressman and Chairman of the House of Representatives’ Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure James Oberstar; former AASHTO Executive Director Francis B. Francois;  Former FHWA Director Ray A. Barnhart and former FHWA Administrator Thomsas D. Larson.

Njord’s project oversight of the I-15 CORE has set the stage for innovations that have propelled I-15 CORE into the record books for transportation infrastructure construction

At $1.75 billion, I-15 CORE is UDOT’s biggest ever highway reconstruction and the fastest-built project of its size and budget in the United States. The nearly completed project will be finished ahead of schedule and $230 million under budget this December.

The contracting approach, called Fixed-Price, Best-Design, added a best value element to the traditional Design-Build contracting process and allowed UDOT to deliver the best project possible for available funding. UDOT’s request for proposal asked for reconstruction of fourteen miles of freeway; the winning contractor, Provo River Constructors, proposed building twenty eight miles.

Requirements to keep lanes open during construction pressed the contractor to use innovative means, like bridge moves and split-lane configurations, to keep traffic moving and save time for road users.  The Sam White Bridge move was one of the most remarkable time-saving fetes of the project.

Because the Sam White Bridge was built off-site and moved into place in a single weekend, the move resulted in much shorter delays and much less construction impact for the traveling public than the traditional built on-site method. And at 354 feet, structure was the largest bridge ever moved into place the western hemisphere.

The George S. Bartlett award is presented yearly by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the American Road & Transportation Builders Association, and the Transportation Research Board. Established in 1931, by friends of Bartlett, founders intended the award to commemorate his “spirit of friendship and helpfulness.”


Images and information provided by Andrew Johnson and 24 Salt Lake Traffic.

Construction on the I-15 corridor expansion through Utah County, called I-15 CORE, is still in full-swing, but officials say all lanes could be open as early as Thanksgiving.

The new interchange at University Parkway and I-15. When complete in December, I-15 CORE will be the fastest billion-dollar public highway project ever built in the U.S.

Between January 2010 and May 2012, about 6 million hours have been logged in the I-15 CORE project, which is almost as many hours as it took to construct the Empire State Building in New York.

About 6 million hours have been logged in the I-15 CORE project — almost as many hours as it took to construct the Empire State Building.

“A workforce of nearly 2,000 people has put in those 6 million hours designing, building, and managing the I-15 CORE project,” says UDOT I-15 CORE spokesperson Leigh Dethman in a recent interview. “From surveying, to traffic management, to construction, to quality assurance and oversight, the project has helped spur economic development and job creation during construction.”

When complete in December, I-15 CORE will be the fastest billion-dollar public highway project ever built in the U.S.

Facts about the I-15 CORE construction project

The I-15 CORE project is the largest highway project in Utah history, and crews with Provo River Constructors are reconstructing 24 miles of I-15 through Utah County.

Two additional lanes are being added each direction from Spanish Fork to Lehi. In addition, 10 freeway interchanges and 63 bridges are being replaced or rebuilt, and the Express Lane is being extended from University Parkway in Orem to Spanish Fork.

Here is a look at some project facts as of May 31, 2012:

  • Crews have installed 49 miles of drainage pipeline, which is twice the length of Utah Lake.
  • 269 lane-miles of concrete have been poured, which is enough to build a two-lane highway from Provo to Logan.
  • 7.1 million tons of fill dirt have been excavated and placed, which is enough to fill 13 BYU Marriott Centers.
  • 1.9 million square yards of concrete pavement have been used, which is more than 5 times the amount of pavement used to pour construct the runways at the Salt Lake City International Airport.
  • Nearly 1,600 employees have been working on the management, engineering and construction teams.
  • Nearly 6 million hours of labor have been logged. It took 7 million hours to construct the Empire State Building!

“We’re delivering a complete reconstruction of the freeway that will meet traffic demand through the year 2030, while at the same time we’re using innovation to minimize delays for the traveling public,” says Todd Jensen, UDOT I-15 CORE project director. “Completing I-15 CORE in an unprecedented 35 months represents Utah’s worldwide leadership in innovative road construction.”

Stay up to date with the project by visiting the I-15 CORE website.


TravelWise during freeway re-construction in Utah County

While workers busily reconstruct I-15 in Utah County, commuters can choose TravelWise strategies to make travel more convenient. These workers are installing concrete. See another post about 40-year pavement in an earlier post: http://blog.udot.utah.gov/2011/01/first-design-to-last/

Choices can make all the difference — leaving for work earlier, car pooling or tele-working can help commuters avoid traffic delay and get around more efficiently during road construction. UDOT has promoted TravelWise strategies to individuals and businesses for years. Now messages about those helpful strategies are being integrated into the biggest construction project in the state- the I- 15 CORE project in Utah County.

Traffic on I-15 in Utah County--taking public transportation can be a cost-saving and convenient travel option.

I-15 CORE Project Team members have emphasized these TravelWise strategies since the beginning of construction of the project by posting information on construction website and presenting information to employers close to the construction corridor.

“TravelWise strategies have been a key component of our communication plans for the I-15 CORE project from the very beginning, says Scott Thompson, Public Involvement Manager in UDOT Region Three. “We understand that strategies such as carpooling, tele-commuting, trip chaining and flexible work schedules are vital in helping us reduce traffic during this construction project.”

Here are some great strategies for businesses that be used to implement a TravelWise construction plan to help employees:

  • Identify a TravelWise coordinator or implementation task force to oversee the program.
  • Conduct a participant survey (provided by the TravelWise team) to determine interest.
  • Design your program to fit best with participant interests. To get started, visit www.travelwise.utah.gov.
  • Promote your TravelWise program through newsletters, emails, on a website, etc.
  • Track participation and effectiveness of the program and make any necessary adjustments.

Road users who adopt TravelWise strategies can see many benefits including enjoying a less stress-free commute or a more economical use of time when running errands. UDOT encourages all drivers to take a lot a look at the TravelWise website and incorporate helpful strategies into travel plans.

When more people use TravelWise strategies, cumulative benefits can help everyone, since travel delay can be reduced. “We continue to promote TravelWise messages in everything we do and believe they have been beneficial in helping us reduce congestion in Utah County,” says Thompson.

Contact the I5-CORE team with any questions or concerns along the way.


I-15 CORE pavement layers stack up to a durable, weather resistant, low maintenance, 40-year life.

Traffic has switched to new concrete pavement between Lindon and American Fork, marking I-15 CORE as twenty-five percent complete. The new smooth ride is a predictor of good things to come.


PAVEMENT PANORMA: Click on this image to view a larger version. Thanks goes to John Butterfield, UDOT Materials/Pavement Engineer, for this great photo.

More than just a pretty surface

“Any pavement design is a multi-layered system,” says John Butterfield, UDOT Materials and Pavement Engineer on the I-15 CORE project. I-15 CORE pavement consists of four layers from the bottom up: granular borrow, drainable granular borrow, asphalt base and Portland Cement concrete.

The amount of material in each layer is adjusted according to different factors, like drainage requirements, availability of materials or project budget. Traffic volume is the most important factor engineers consider when designing pavement.

Where the rubber hits

“The main thing that drives pavement design is traffic,” says Butterfield.  “It all has to add up to the structural value that is predicted from traffic volume expected on that road.”

The forty-year pavement design on the I-15 CORE project is a value-added feature that the contractor, Provo River Constructors, included in their winning proposal.  UDOT asked for 30-year pavement, “they gave us forty,” says Butterfield.

Why concrete?

Going the extra mile: A worker makes smooth concrete even smoother for a bump-free ride.

UDOT prefers concrete on high-volume roads. “Under heavy interstate traffic, concrete is the best investment,” Butterfield explains, because it’s smooth, rigid and less maintenance is required compared to asphalt. “We just know it works and it will last if it’s done right.”

Concrete is also weather resistant. In engineer-speak, concrete has “an air void system to allow for the pressures generated when internal water freezes.”

Translated, that means potholes are exceptionally rare!

VIDEO: This  KSL story below shows concrete installation, and the video after the story shows the layers that make up the pavement.


Video Courtesy of KSL.com


UDOT Executive Director John Njord addressed several issues, including I-15 CORE selection, the settlement and inappropriate employee conduct during in-depth KSL Radio interview on today’s Doug Wright Show.

To hear the interview, follow the link below, then scroll down and click The Doug Wright Show (second hour) for Thursday, Sept. 30.