Tag Archives: fatalities

Report: Nearly Half of All Fatalities in 2013 Were Not Buckled Up

219 lives were lost in car crashes on Utah’s roads in 2013, up two from 2012. Although Utah only experienced a slight increase in fatalities from last year, any climb in fatality numbers is troubling.

Graphic demonstrating 219 live losts on Utah highways

Even more alarming is the number of Utahns killed in crashes because they were not buckled up. Excluding pedestrian, bicyclist and motorcyclist fatalities, nearly half (46.7%) of people killed on Utah’s roads in 2013 were not wearing a seat belt.

Chart showing the significant increase in fatalitiy numbers of Improper Restraint compaired to other factors.

Wearing a seat belt is one of the simplest things you can do to prevent death or serious injury when involved in a crash. In fact, people who aren’t properly buckled up are 40 times more likely to die in a car crash than those who are.

Buckling up only takes moments to do, and could mean the difference between life or death. Commit now to always wear your seat belt, and let your passengers know that your car won’t move until everyone is buckled up.

Here is a snapshot of the top five deadly driving behaviors killing people on Utah’s roads:

Graphic showing the top five deadly driving behaviros and how many people were killed by each.

Utah is making progress toward our goal of Zero Fatalities, but we still have work to do. UDOT reminds drivers and passengers to always wear your seat belt, slow down, put down phone and never drive drowsy or impaired. If we work together, we can each our goal of Zero Fatalities.

Join us as we continue the conversation about Zero Fatalities on Twitter and Facebook. You can also review the full 2013 Fatalities Data Analysis report by visiting the Zero Fatalities website.

This guest post was written by Zero Fatalities team member Mary Rice.

FIVE WAYS TO SAVE LIVES ON UTAH’S ROADS

In 2012, 215 lives were lost on Utah’s roads in car crashes—the lowest Utah traffic fatalities have been since 1959. We are making progress toward our goal of Zero Fatalities, but we still have a ways to go. These 215 fatalities were preventable and we hope we can continue to see this number decline, ultimately to zero.

Fatality Numbers

Here are five simple ways to save lives—including your own—on Utah’s roads.

  1. Always, always buckle up. Wearing your seat belt is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a crash. In 2012, buckling up could have saved 67 lives on Utah’s roads. Buckling up takes two seconds to do, and could mean the difference between life or death in a crash. Commit now to always wear your seat belt, and let your passengers know that your car won’t move until everyone is buckled up.
  2. If you’ve been drinking, don’t drive. Designate a driver, call a cab or take public transit. There is no excuse for driving under the influence. Sadly, 41 people died in Utah due to impaired driving in 2012. Alcohol and illegal drugs aren’t the only things that can impair your driving. Prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and lack of sleep can also impair your ability to drive safely.
  3. Too tired? Don’t drive. Believe it or not, drowsy driving kills. Fourteen fatalities in 2012 are attributed to drowsy driving. If you’re feeling drowsy, pull over and switch drivers, find a safe place to sleep for the night or get out of the car and stretch or jog for a few minutes. Drowsy driving is just as dangerous as drunk driving.
  4. Stay focused on the road. With so many potential distractions, a driver’s attention may easily get diverted if the driver isn’t making a conscious effort to stay focused on the road. It takes just one time of looking away for a brief moment—reading a text, changing the radio or even answering the phone—to cause a disaster. Twenty people died in 2012 in distracted driving-related crashes.
  5. Slow down and don’t drive aggressively. Whether you have a “need for speed” or you’re running a few minutes late, pushing that accelerator a little harder could cost you your life—it cost 43 people theirs in 2012. A total of 49 people died on Utah’s roads in 2012 due to aggressive driving or speeding. Aggressive driving means operating a vehicle in a way that endangers or is likely to endanger people or property.

2012 Zero Fatalities Infographic

Join us as we continue the conversation about Zero Fatalities, what you can do and how we’re doing toward our goal in 2013 by following us on Twitter and liking us on Facebook. You can also review the full 2012 Fatalities Data Analysis report by visiting the Zero Fatalities website.

This post was written by Jane Putnam, Zero Fatalities Team.

BUCKLE UP FOR THE ONES YOU LOVE

UDOT, the Utah Highway Patrol, and Zero Fatalities are encouraging people to buckle up not just for themselves but also for their loved ones.

The Zero Fatalities team kicked off the year at its annual press conference by announcing that Utah’s traffic fatalities are at the lowest point they have been since 1974 with 233 fatalities. While the numbers have gone down, the stats are still no where near reaching its goal. This past year, Utah had an 89.2 percent seat belt usage rate—yet the 11 percent who did not buckle up accounted for more than 30 percent of the traffic fatalities alone, and more than one in three traffic fatalities over the last five years.

The conference also highlighted a young girl Ashli Hendricks who was devastated when a tragic car crash took her father’s life in 2001. A video of Ashli’s story was shown which spoke to parents who don’t wear seat belts and are putting their families’ futures at risk.

Based on a focus group conducted by UDOT, drivers say that their motivation for buckling up is if their family members tell them to. Speakers emphasized to drivers the importance of thinking about others, especially their loved ones, when driving on the road and not wearing a seat belt.

“It may not be the most important thing to you,” said Ashli. “But it is the most important thing to [your family].”

This guest post was written by Monica Hasebi. Monica is an information specialist in the UDOT Communications Office.

FOCUS ON SEATBELTS

Utah traffic related fatalities are the lowest in 36 years, but there’s no low that’s too low.

Tim Cosgrove, who works as a Child Advocate for Primary Children's Medical Center, encourages Mallory to keep speaking out about safe behavior choices.

Out of the 235 people who lost their lives in 2010, 89 were not wearing seatbelts. ” That’s 89 people who could be here with us today,” says UDOT Deputy Director Carlos Braceras.

“We do our best to engineer the roads,” said Braceras. “But there’s only so much that we can do. We can’t make you put down that cell phone. We can’t make you give the keys to someone who hasn’t been drinking. We can’t make you put on your seat belt. That’s up to everyone who gets in a car.”

Reducing crashes on our roads is a shared responsibility

One fatality means the loss of a beloved sibling, child or parent. Eighteen year old Mallory Martinez knows she might have been one of those fatalities had she not been wearing a seatbelt one day last November.

The Westminster College student was on her way home to Price, Utah for a weekend visit and was operating her iPod while driving on U.S. 6. She clipped a trailer “and from there I just spun and lost control,” said Martinez.

While her car was rolling, her thoughts were on her siblings and parents. Her car was totaled but she walked away with some scrapes. Martinez knows she’s lucky so she takes time to tell others to stay safe.

Video Courtesy of KSL.com