Tag Archives: employee safety

Employee Advisory Council October 2016 Meeting

The Employee Advisory Council met October 17, 2016. Items that were included in the discussion included:

  • Employee Appreciation and Recognition Programs
  • Trans Tech Training
  • Van Share
  • Employee Safety
  • Employee Website
  • Water for Maintenance Stations
  • Consultant Evaluations
  • UDOT Branding
  • Giving Tree

Notes from the meeting are available below.

EAC October 2016 Summary

Information from previous meetings has also been posted on the blog.

Employee Advisory Council

Employee Advisory Council October 2015 Meeting

The Employee Advisory Council met October 21, 2015. Items that were included in the discussion included:

  • Salary Increases
  • Safety Clothing Committee Discussion
  • CDLs and Health Issues
  • Tool Allowance for Mechanics
  • Overview of UDOT Learning Center
  • Teddy Bears for Incident Management and Department of Public Safety
  • Incentives

Notes from the meeting are available below.

EAC October 2015 Summary

Information from previous meetings has also been posted on the blog.

Employee Advisory Council

An elevator message that saves lives

SALT LAKE CITY — In an effort achieve the goal of Zero Crashes, Injuries and Fatalities, the Utah Department of Transportation unveiled a new reminder for state employees last week. The message isn’t new, but the placement is, and people are noticing (and hopefully remembering to buckle up).

Elevators at the State’s Calvin Rampton Complex in Salt Lake now remind employees and visitors to buckle up their seat belts to save their own lives as well as the lives of those riding with them.
ZeroElevator
“Convincing people to buckle up, not drive impaired, stop texting and stay awake while driving is no easy task,” said Zero Fatalities Program Manager Stacy Johnson. “These elevator doors grab your attention and, in a very creative way, encourage seat belt usage.”

Executive Director Carlos Braceras said while UDOT’s mission and goals  touch a variety of topics, one item is more important than any.

“Nothing that we do is more important than safety,” Braceras said recently to employees.  “Zero is our number one goal. Zero fatalities. Zero crashes. Zero injuries.”

Zero Fatalities’ seat belt statistics are eye-opening:

  • Ninety-three percent of all crashes are due to driving behavior
  • National traffic fatalities are the lowest they’ve been since 1958, but people who don’t buckle up represent more than half of those fatalities
  • Unbuckled passengers can become a projectile, and increase the risk of hurting or killing others in the car by 40 percent
  • People are 30 times more likely to be ejected from a vehicle during a crash
  • 75 percent of people who are ejected during a crash die from their injuries

While road engineering and law enforcement help to decrease fatalities, education is an important part of the road to Zero Fatalities as well. The education comes in a number of ways:

School Assemblies and Events: With programs like Zero Fatalities, Don’t Drive Stupid, and Click it or Ticket targeting soon-to-be-drivers and their parents, over 500,000 people have been reached in the first five years. In 2014 alone, Zero Fatalities did approximately 214 presentations to schools around the Beehive State.

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Commercial Public Service Announcements such as this one, which was originally shown during the 2014 Super Bowl.

Advertising: Using a variety of messaging,  like radio spots or posters, Zero Fatalities keeps messages about life-saving habits are always on the minds of people in Utah.

Social Media videos, Facebook posts, and tweets make it easier to share the message with more people daily.

 

Results: The number of traffic fatalities in Utah has dropped 22 percent since the Zero Fatalities program began in 2006. In the year 2000, Utah had 373 fatalities, but by the end of 2013, Utah had 221 fatalities. And awareness of the program is rising: public opinion research shows that 3 out of 4 Utahns (age 18 to 54) are aware of the Zero Fatalities message. Of course, awareness does not always translate to behavior modification, but of those who are aware of the Zero Fatalities message, an average of 51 percent admit that the Zero Fatalities program “definitely” or “probably” influenced them to avoid the five Zero Fatalities behaviors: driving drowsy, distracted, aggressive, impaired, or unbuckled.

ZeroJazzDraft1

Zero Fatalities program has also become a model for other states: Arizona, Iowa and Nevada have embraced the Zero Fatalities message and are running similar programs at varying levels. We’re happy that Utah’s Zero Fatalities program is the state’s contribution to the national and international visions to reduce traffic fatalities, and we wanted to make sure the message started at home as well.

To learn more about the program, or to schedule a member of the Zero Fatalities Team to come and present to your division or group,  visit www.udot.utah.gov, or www.zerofatalities.com.

A Season of Safety

This guest post was written by Region 2 Deputy Director Tim Rose to remind UDOT employees of important safety practices.

Spring is finally here. The tulips in my yard are blooming, the trees are budding and orange barrels are starting to sprout and multiply.  It’s that time of year again: construction and maintenance season.

As we begin our construction projects and start working on maintaining our road system after a long winter, I would like to take this opportunity to discuss some work zone safety tips and other general safety thoughts. All UDOT employees have a responsibility to make safety a priority—for the sake of our teams, our contractors, our families and our traveling public. Here are some important things to remember as we ramp up our construction and maintenance activities:

1) Traffic Control

  • Ensure all signs and traffic control devices are clean, undamaged and being used correctly for the job at hand.
  • Never stand, talk with a coworker or walk with your back to oncoming traffic. Keep your eyes on oncoming traffic at all times. Whenever possible, use a spotter or second set of eyes to watch your back.
  • Make sure that your traffic control is set up correctly.

2) Working in Trenches

  • Make sure trench boxes are used when needed and that the contractor or your team provides a proper means of ingress and egress.

3) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

  • UDOT Team in PPEMake sure you, your coworkers and contractors wear the proper PPE for the job or task at hand.
  • While working with hand or power tools, make sure the tools are in proper working order and that all guards/safety features are attached and functioning.
  • Make sure you are using the tools in the manner intended and that you wear the required face shields, eye protection, hearing protection, etc.

4) Entering and Exiting Vehicles

  • When getting in and out of your vehicle within a work zone, or on the open road, make sure your vehicle is parked in a safe location, out of the way of contractor equipment and active areas of work.
  • Check your mirrors and make sure that you are clear of oncoming traffic before you open the door to exit the vehicle.
  • Make sure you have good footing before you step out of the vehicle. Look for slick surfaces and loose ground.

5) Equipment and Vehicle Inspection

  • Inspect all equipment before use to make sure it is in good condition and working order prior to use. Repair the equipment before use if necessary.
  • Make sure you conduct your pre-trip inspections each time you start your shift. This applies to everyone and all vehicles, from motor pool cars and assigned pickup trucks to one-tons and ten-wheelers.
  • Report vehicle maintenance issues or warning lights to your regional equipment shop or maintenance area supervisor so that small issues don’t become major problems.

6) Think

  • Take a few minutes at the beginning of each day and think about the things that could go wrong or dangerous situations that may occur during your shift. Also consider how to mitigate those risks.
  • During your shift, always think about what you can do to improve safe work practices for yourself and your team.
  • At the end of each day, ask yourself what you are going to do tomorrow that will enhance a safe work environment for all of us.

If you ever have a question about how to handle any safety-related situation, please call your region safety manager immediately. They are always available and happy to assist you with any questions or concerns. And as always, wear your seat belts, your orange and your protective gear. Work safely and have a great summer.