Tag Archives: CTAB

I-80 Silver Creek Reconstruction

Photo of concrete pavingDrivers traveling through Summit County on I-80 have become familiar with one of the Region’s largest construction projects: the concrete reconstruction of I-80 from the U.S. 40 junction (MP 148) to Wanship (MP 155). Work began in June and is scheduled to continue through November of 2015 (construction will be halted during the winter months between 2014 and 2015).

The project includes replacing the freeway’s asphalt with new concrete pavement. In many locations, the existing asphalt will be removed and the pavement will be completely reconstructed. The new concrete will help accommodate the heavy trucks that travel in both directions along this key freight corridor and will prolong the life of the roadway.

UDOT’s contractor, Geneva Rock, is constructing the road in two principal phases. Phase one – the current phase – has shifted all traffic to the westbound lanes, allowing crews to reconstruct the eastbound lanes. In November, once the eastbound lanes are complete, lane restrictions will be lifted and traffic will be returned to its normal configuration. In the spring, crews will shift all traffic into the newly reconstructed eastbound lanes and complete work in the westbound lanes.

Photo of concrete pavingAs part of the concrete reconstruction, a unique pavement base material is being used to provide strength and stability to the pavement. The material, called Cement-Treated Asphalt Base (CTAB), provides a strong and stable base for the concrete to ensure durability and longevity. The CTAB material is formed by pulverizing the existing asphalt and adding cement powder and water to make a low strength concrete.

Typically, concrete pavement is either overlaid over the existing asphalt (as with the concrete paving project on S.R. 201), or a thin layer of asphalt is applied to the existing pavement and then the concrete is overlaid. On this section of I-80, however, the existing pavement is deteriorating too quickly to provide a suitable base. Instead of overlaying an additional layer of asphalt, CTAB was selected because of its lower cost and better resistance to water damage. While concrete treated bases have been used for a long time, this is the first instance in Utah where a cement treated base uses 100 percent recycled asphalt.

The project team has been involved in an extensive stakeholder outreach and public information program. Key stakeholders, such as Summit County, local emergency services, and the communities of Tollgate and Promontory, have been kept informed and consulted throughout the project to minimize impacts wherever possible and coordinate essential information such as emergency plans.

Photo of concrete pavingUDOT and Geneva Rock have worked together to address stakeholder concerns and mitigate risks associated with this traffic configuration. Local emergency crews are allowed to access the work zone in the event that they are not able to travel through open traffic lanes in a timely manner. Tow trucks are on-call at both ends of the construction zone to reduce response times to incidents and keep traffic moving.

Due to the long-term closure of Tollgate’s eastbound on- and off-ramps, accommodations needed to be made to provide residents access to their community, especially in case of emergency. The project team worked with the neighboring Promontory development to allow Tollgate residents to use of Promontory’s private access roads in order to bypass I-80 as they travel to and from Park City.

UDOT, Geneva Rock, and the local stakeholders have established a good working relationship for this significant reconstruction – a project that will ensure this section of I-80 stays in good repair for years to come.

This guest post was originally published in the Region Two Fall 2014 Newsletter.