UDOT Region Four takes in half of the state. While other regions face heavy snow or urban traffic, Region Four’s challenge is to coordinate work over a large area. Geographic Information System (GIS) tools have helped that coordination process.

The following post is the first of a two-part series about how GIS tools help employees expedite work and refine the quality of information needed to improve the transportation system.

Data Portal screenshotGIS data can be accessed at the UDOT Data Portal.  Much of the information on the site is geo-referenced – that is, given an exact spatial location. The UDOT Data Portal also has tools to view and analyze the data sets. Tools include maps and the Linear Bench, a straight line diagram generator. Both tools can be populated with multiple data sets, like the location of culverts or bridges. Data sets can also be downloaded.

Maps and apps improve work coordination

The Utah Prairie Dog, which occupies habitat within the right-of-way of many highways in Region Four, is afforded protection under the Endangered Species Act. UDOT recently completed a formal consultation with the US Fish and Wildlife Service that defined measures to minimize impacts to this species.

As part of implementing these measures, UDOT uses GIS and GPS tools to identify and quantify the acreage of habitat of temporary and permanent impacts. The tools expedite surveying and monitoring efforts so UDOT can quickly complete necessary road work.

Material pits are the sources of rock, sand and gravel used on construction and maintenance projects. Pits located on BLM or US Forrest Service land require permits.

An app that geographically displays the pits along with their permitting information is helping UDOT employees stay on top of the permitting process. The app generates an automatic email six months before expiration of the permit so UDOT won’t risk losing access to pits.  

August 30th, 2013

I-15 CORE Wins Two Safety Awards

No Comments, Optimize Mobility, by John Gleason.

UDOT’s I-15 CORE and Provo River Constructors were recently selected by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association as winners of 2013 Roadway Work Zone Safety Awareness Awards in the local educational campaign and training categories. UDOT won for its campaign on the lane split traffic configurations and PRC won for its overall safety program that included their “Hands-on Safety” outreach.

Lane Splits Outreach Campaign

As part of I-15 CORE construction, the lanes on I-15 in Orem and American Fork were split around the construction zone. The lane splits created a communication and traffic challenge, as drivers would need to know which lanes to use long before they reached the area – so they could either exit or stay on the freeway.

The maintenance of traffic (MOT) and communications teams developed a comprehensive outreach campaign that would raise awareness of the upcoming traffic configuration and provide information on how to safely navigate them and divert at least 20 percent of traffic, to keep the freeway flowing smoothly. The campaign included TV and print news stories, radio advertisements, social media and direct mail. A highlight of the outreach campaign was a clever movie theater ad that played like a romantic-comedy trailer.

In less than one month, over a quarter-of-a-million movie goers saw the movie trailer and more than 8,000 viewed the instructional video the month before the lane splits were in place. As the real sign of success, traffic continued to move smoothly through the construction area while the splits were in place.

PRC’s Hands On Safety Campaign

PRC had to build 24 miles of I-15 in just 35 months, but the I-15 CORE design-builder still made safety its number-one priority.

PRC carried out a comprehensive safety program that all employees adopted in their daily work. All of the nearly 6,000 employees attended a mandatory Project Safety and Railroad Orientation before they could start work. Weekly toolbox safety meetings, monthly “All-Hands” safety meetings, safety pre-planning and pre-shift safety task planning, jobsite inspections, accident investigations, medical treatment management, and tracking of any indicators and trends before and after incident were all required.

Even with all this training, management began seeing a trend of hand injuries among work crews. To reverse this trend, PRC developed and implemented a “Hands-on Safety” program emphasizing pinch point awareness and hand protection guidelines. The program included presentations, posters and a policy change to require gloves to be worn at all times when handling tools and/or materials.

The success of PRC’s work zone safety approach resulted in crews achieving one million workhours without a recordable incident, and one million work-hours without a lost-time incident on four separate occasions.  PRC put in over 7 million work hours to build I-15 CORE and achieved a safety record that was four times better than the national average in the construction industry.

August 27th, 2013

A Vision for the Future

No Comments, Employee Focus, by Tania Mashburn.
Carlos Braceras, UDOT Executive Director

Carlos Braceras, UDOT Executive Director

Carlos is a man with a vision. A vision to make a difference.

It may sound simple, but it’s true. Over the past several weeks, he and his leadership team crafted a shared Vision Statement for the Department’s future that will help us enhance communities, improve the environment, and cultivate a stronger economy.

But this vision has actually been in the making for months…starting with ideas rolling around in Carlos’ head and jotted down as quick notes on his phone as new thoughts came to him. Let’s back up even further. This really all started when John Njord retired.

Choosing a new Executive Director for UDOT was a very high priority for Governor Herbert. It required Carlos to evaluate why he wanted the position and what he would do if he was successful. He said it took several months of thinking about the department and where we could make improvements.

“This was pretty tough because of the excellent work already going on in our organization,” Carlos said. But he wanted to find ways to better align with the Governor’s goals and broaden the areas in which we focus.

So this is where Carlos’ vision was born. He says he felt UDOT’s four strategic goals were taking us in the right direction, but there were other areas we could give priority to…leading him to determine our new “emphasis areas.” These emphasis areas are a combination of how we do our jobs and how we can improve our organization. They are:

  • Integrated Transportation
  • Collaboration
  • Education
  • Transparency
  • Quality
  • Operational Excellence

Carlos also says he took a lot of time to think about what UDOT’s core values are, values that we as employees all live by, but have never officially been put in writing.

“A lot of times in our business, decisions are easy to make,” Carlos said. “We can look in a manual or go online and get a direct answer. But most of the time the questions are much more difficult and there is no easy answer. That is where I expect our great employees to look to our core values to provide guidance. Think about these as the traits you would like the public to think about when they think about UDOT.”

For five months, every time Carlos heard a characteristic he thought represented UDOT, he wrote it down. In the end he had quite a long list, but he narrowed it down to only the most important values he would like our department to exemplify; innovation, trustworthiness, dedication, passion, public responsiveness, and fiscal responsibility. Carlos says, “These are the traits that I hope will guide us when we’re making difficult decisions.”

So back to the job interview. More than 60 people applied for the position of UDOT’s Executive Director. A screening and interview process narrowed the field to Carlos and two others. In an interview with Governor Herbert, Lt. Governor Bell, and the Governor’s staff, Carlos was asked two key questions.

When he was asked “what is your vision for the department?” he was prepared and happy he had thought about this very thing for several months. When he was asked “why do you want the job?” he was also quick to respond saying, “Because the work we do at UDOT makes a difference to all Utahns. We save lives, we improve the economy, and we make everyone’s lives better. I love Utah and I want to make a difference.”

Carlos says he is extremely grateful he now has the opportunity to work towards making a difference in his new role as Executive Director. When I asked him where he saw the department in ten years, he admitted his vision might change.

“Today I am confident we’re heading in the right direction, but tomorrow we have to be prepared to ask the question ‘is there more we can be doing in order to keep Utah’s transportation system the envy of the country?’”

Carlos says he knows with the dedication of our incredible employees, we will be able to make his vision a reality. He says, “I continue to be amazed by the passion all of you bring to your jobs. You don’t think of it as your job, but your mission to improve the quality of life in this great state.”

Carlos looks forward to having one-on-one discussion with employees about his new vision over the next several months. In the meantime, you can see what all the buzz is about. A downloadable PDF of the complete Vision plan is available below.

Carlos Vision

RWIS Network Map

UDOT RWIS network

Utah’s unique geography can be a challenge for traffic management and safety. Many of the critical highway routes in the state are in rural areas and can be prone to flooding, snow drifts, landslides, high winds or low visibility due to wild fire smoke. UDOT’s Road Weather Information System (RWIS) network currently has nearly 80 deployments throughout the state. An RWIS unit has several weather sensors that calculate wind speed, precipitation type, roadway temperature and more. Some RWIS have a traffic camera as well.

Utah has had an active winter and spring with several large storms, flooding and landslides. In June, UDOT deployed a portable RWIS unit near Monument Peak on SR-31. This site was adjacent to an area that was burned in a forest fire and was at risk for landslides. The portable RWIS can be relocated at a later date for other uses. The RWIS sends alerts to the UDOT Traffic Operations Center (TOC) meteorologists who can then contact UDOT crews and UDOT management working in a specific area and alert them to any danger of landslides or flooding. The alert information is also shared with the National Weather Service, the National Forest Service, the United States Geological Survey, Utah Highway Patrol and other agencies. UDOT contracts with Northwest Weathernet for meteorological services and RWIS installation.

Photo of portable RWIS station

Portable RWIS unit being deployed for use during the Rockport 5 Fire

 

Screen shot of RWIS alert

A rainfall alert from the portable RWIS

 

For more information about our use of RWIS also check out RWIS Update and Forecasting for Smarties.

August 13th, 2013

Giving Props to a Public Employee

No Comments, Employee Focus, by Tania Mashburn.

“You can sleep when you die.”Valentino "Bobo" Martinez

That’s the motto Valentino Martinez lives by… but most of us know him as “Bobo.” He’s the shed supervisor at maintenance station 1427 in Centerville. This week, Bobo was notified that he was chosen to receive the Utah Public Employee Salute. The honor is reserved for any city, county, or state government employee who goes above and beyond to help the public.

What’s really impressive is that this is the second time Bobo has received this award. As you can see from his picture, he’s kind of a big deal.

“He is really motivated to go and make sure things are done and things are done well,” says Vic Saunders, Region 1 Communications Manager. “He’s willing to be of service in a time when so many people are concerned about themselves. To see someone who is really service oriented is such a great thing.”

Bobo and his crew have a tremendous amount of responsibility to keep I-15 in Davis County and Legacy Parkway in good condition. When we’re all home in our beds asleep, Bobo and his crew are out there working. Bobo says they do 90% of their work (which includes sweeping, plowing, and road repairs) at night so they don’t impact drivers.

So when do they sleep? That’s where his motto comes in.

When I asked Bobo how he felt about being chosen for the award, he said simply “I feel good. I feel the job I’m doing is making everybody in the public happy.”

Bobo admits he couldn’t be the supervisor he is without his fantastic crew. Whether it’s clearing the roads after a major snow storm, or jumping right in to clean up after a major wind storm, his crew is always up for the challenge. In fact, he says any one of them could have been chosen for the award.

“He knows the area like the back of his hand and he takes care of it like it’s his own,” said Region 1 Director Kris Peterson. “He’s got a large, diverse crew and they work hard together towards reaching the department’s goals.”

As part of his winnings, Bobo will become famous. On Wednesday, August 14, KSL’s Doug Wright will announce him as this week’s honoree. Here’s how it will go:

Now it’s time for the Public Employee Salute sponsored by Mountain America Credit Union and the Utah Public Employee’s Association. This week’s honoree is Valentino “Bobo” Martinez.

Bobo is a supervisor for the Utah Department of Transportation Region 1. Bobo and his crew are responsible for keeping I-15 and Legacy Parkway open for commuters to and from Salt Lake City in all kinds of traffic and weather conditions. This means Bobo and his crew conduct projects in the middle of the night so not to interfere with the 170,000 vehicles a day that travel those stretches of road. Bobo is called out at all hours of the night to assist the Utah Highway Patrol in traffic incident management and clean-up.

Thank you, Bobo, for your service to the citizens of Utah. Bobo will receive two Hale Centre Theatre tickets and will be honored at the semi-annual Public Employee Salute Luncheon.

Bobo says he hopes he can take his wife to a show at the Hale Centre Theatre to celebrate…but he’ll likely be out hunting.

Next time you see Bobo, tell him congratulations on his big award (and give him a hard time about his picture).

If you would like to nominate a public employee who has gone above and beyond, you can nominate them for the Public Employee Salute by going to upea.net.

August 8th, 2013

Drowsy Driving Experiment

2 Comments, Zero Fatalities, by Tania Mashburn.
Drowsy Driving Deomonstration

Four volunteers attempted to perform basic driving maneuvers after more than 30 hours without sleep.

It’s 4 a.m. While most Utahns are still fast asleep, four people, each with very different lives, all have one thing in common…they’re struggling to stay awake. Nate Davis is a businessman and father of four. Kylie Lalumia is a brand new mom. Lindsey Tait is 17 years old and has a busy social life. Ben Winslow is a reporter for Fox13 News. In each of their cases, it wouldn’t be unheard of to go with very little sleep.

Fast forward ten hours. This group has now been up for 30 hours or more…and they’re going to get behind the wheel. Sound dangerous? It is. That’s the point.

On Wednesday, August 7, UDOT and the Department of Public Safety held a media event to demonstrate the effects of drowsy driving. Nate, Kylie, Lindsey and Ben were invited to test their skills on DPS’s driving range. Each had to navigate through a field of cones as they tried to back up, change lanes, make sharp turns, and parallel park. How well did each driver do? Let’s just say it’s a good thing the obstacles were cones and not kids.

“Oh my gosh,” said Kylie as she ran over another cone.

“It’s a lot tougher to concentrate,” Nate said as he spun the steering wheel. “Interpreting what’s coming next is what’s getting me.”

Ben, who has a high-paced job where he jumps from story to story and is constantly tweeting, admitted the lack of sleep definitely slowed him down. He said, “It was difficult to just think. My cognitive skills were delayed…everything was just delayed because I was so tired.”

“I didn’t realize how many cones I had knocked down until you go back and look,” said a surprised Lindsey. “If I was on the road, I don’t know how many cars I would have hit. People are out there. It’s crazy to think about.”

What’s really crazy to think about is that driving drowsy can be just as dangerous as driving drunk. In fact, being awake for 20 hours is equal to a blood alcohol concentration of .08%, which is legally drunk and leaves you at a much higher risk for a crash. A drowsy driver often displays the same symptoms as a drunk driver; blurred vision, slow reaction time, and weaving in and out of lanes.

So far this year, at least 8 fatalities in Utah have been attributed to drowsy driving…and there may be more. The problem is these types of crashes are difficult to identify because the driver is often alone and there are no blood tests that show fatigue. While UDOT and UHP work hard to make our roads as safe as possible through engineering and enforcement, the driver is ultimately responsible for their own safety and those around them.

“Driving is difficult,” Sgt. Matt Smith with UHP says. “It takes a lot of focus and mental ability, and unfortunately when people are so tired, it goes right along the lines of impaired drivers.”

Nearly everyone is guilty of driving drowsy, but most people don’t realize how dangerous they actually are. Here’s something to think about. You are at risk of getting in a crash if:

  • You are driving longer than 2 hours without a break
  • You are driving alone
  • You are driving at night
  • You got 6 hours of sleep or less the night before
  • You’re working or going to school more than 60 hours a week
  • You’ve been drinking or taking medication

The best thing you can do to make sure you’re not putting yourself and others at risk is planning ahead and getting enough sleep, especially if you’ll be doing a lot of driving the following day.

If you do find yourself nodding off, having difficulty focusing, blinking excessively, yawning repeatedly, and especially drifting out of your lane, tailgating or hitting rumble strips…it’s your responsibility to get off the road. Turning up the radio or rolling down your window is not going to cut it. Those things don’t work. You need to pull over and switch drivers, take a short nap, get out of the car and stretch or walk around or even find a safe place to sleep for the night.

Nate, Kylie, Lindsey and Ben all said their drowsy driving experiment was eye opening for them…and we’re hoping it will open the eyes of other drivers and maybe save lives.

For more information about the dangers of driving drowsy, go to sleepsmartdrivesmart.com or zerofatalities.com and check out Ben’s story below.

 


 

August 1st, 2013

Employee Recognition

7 Comments, Employee Focus, by Carlos Braceras.

Over the past several months, our leadership team has been looking into ways to better recognize our great employees here at UDOT and listen to your ideas and concerns.  Many of you have provided feedback through an online survey and in-person discussion groups.  Thank you for your participation.  Because of your input, we will be implementing several new programs in the coming months.  Here are some of the areas we will be focusing on:

Management Training – We have some excellent managers and supervisors here at UDOT.  I want to make sure they receive proper training on how to provide feedback and positive recognition to all employees.  We will be implementing a new training program for all managers that will emphasize good communication and positive verbal recognition.

Award/Incentive Program – I would like to give direct supervisors a way to reward their employees for a job well done.  It is a tricky balance between rewarding our employees and being fair with taxpayer dollars.  However, I believe we have come up with a program that will accomplish both.  Every year, each region/group will be given a number of vouchers to distribute to employees as a “pat on the back.”  The vouchers can be traded in for a UDOT logoed shirt.  It became apparent through the feedback we received that you are proud of the work you do at UDOT and many of you would like to have a way to display it.

Employee Advisory Council – This committee will give employees a chance to provide new ideas and voice concerns.  Too often, I don’t have the chance to hear your ideas or the issues you are dealing with.  Through the responses we received, some of you suggested bringing back a committee that could provide feedback to the Executive Director and Deputy Director.  My hope is that the new EAC will be a direct and productive channel of communication for both sides.  It will be made up of two employees from each region/group who will serve on a rotating basis.

Employee of the Year/Leader of the Year – I would like to continue to award the Employee of the Year and Leader of the Year.  It’s a chance for us as a department to recognize the outstanding individuals among us.  We will try to make the nomination process as simple as possible so all employees have an equal chance to be recognized.  There will also be help available to each region/group in writing the application in order to make the awards process fair.  One additional change, we will present the EOY and LOY awards, along with the Career Service award, at the Annual Conference banquet in November.

New Employee Orientation – We will be reintroducing a new employee orientation meeting with several changes.  The goal of this session will be to give new employees a good overview of all the different areas in UDOT and an opportunity to meet and interact with the leadership team.  Each group leader will be asked to present at the orientation, which will be held on a quarterly basis.

Performance Awards/ASIs – Many of you will be happy to learn that we are beginning to give Performance Awards and ASIs again on a limited basis.  Where funding is available, each group and region may give performance awards to up to 6% of their employees for exceptional performance.  While I recognize it is a small number, it’s a step in the right direction.

We are still working out the details on all of the new programs so please stay tuned for more information.  In addition to the changes I’ve listed above, we will also continue our successful recognition programs such as the Silver Barrel awards and the annual region/complex picnics.  Shane and I, along with the leadership team, will also try to be more available to all employees through formal and informal visits to each region and group.

I would like to personally thank each of you for a job well done.  My hope is that we can do a better job of recognizing you for the important work you are doing for this department and the state with these new programs.

July 31st, 2013

Truck Smart and Drive To Stay Alive

2 Comments, Zero Fatalities, by Sarah Stephenson.

Drive to Stay Alive and Truck Smart are brought to you by UDOT’s Motor Carrier Division. These two programs have the same goal of addressing drivers safety but to two different audiences. The Truck Smart program focuses on helping drivers develop a healthy respect for  large trucks and buses while the Drive to Stay Alive program encourages good safety habits among truck drivers. Both campaigns were started almost five years ago but were recently revitalized with a new website containing pamphlets and program information on safe driving.

trucksmart_header

Truck Smart is a program that serves to remind the motoring public of the importance of driving safely around large trucks. Jim Phillips, Utah’s Motor Carrier Training Coordinator said, “Statistically 75% of drivers and big rigs that are involved in an accident, the driver of the automobile is to blame.” 

The newly revitalized Truck Smart website contains driver education information including a student workbook where new drivers can learn how to safely drive with trucks on the road.  The site emphasizes four different aspects of driving with trucks that are important to remember while driving:

1. Know the “No Zone”

  • It’s important for drivers to remember that the front, back and sides of trucks are all “no Zones,” or blindspots,  for truck drivers. When a person is “Camping out” in these zones the driver cannot see you.

2.  Don’t Cut Off Trucks

  • Always give trucks enough room and never cut them off because their stopping distance is not the same as a smaller vehicle.

3. Stopping Distances

  • Trucks always need more time to stop than cars. Be careful when passing and make sure to never cut them off.

4. Wide Turns

  • Trucks have a higher center of gravity and therefore need more room to make turns.  Never try to squeeze past a truck in order to turn because you might just get hit as well.

Drive to stay alive is a program centered around truck drivers, and their passengers to remind all parties of safe driving habits while on the road. The program was primarily for truck drivers but the rules and safety tips apply to all.DTSA_Logo

Safe driving tips include:

Drowsy Driving: 

You are drowsy driving if:

  • Difficulty focusing, frequent blinking, or heavy eyelid
  • Trouble remembering the last few miles driven
  • Repeated yawning
  • Trouble keeping your head up
  • Drifting, tailgating, or hitting shoulder rumble strip
  • Restlessness and irritability

Slowing down, don’t speed

  • Driving too fast can put your life at risk as well as the lives of those around you. Slowing down can make all the difference between a major or a minor accident.

Seat Belt Safety

  • Always buckle up. Period.

The Truck Smart team makes presentations to schools around the state. A presentation was recently given at Westlake High School where 70 student drivers were instructed on the importance of being “Truck Smart” while driving and how to “Drive to Stay Alive.”

Truck Smart and Drive To Stay Alive giving a presentation at Westlake High School.

Truck Smart and Drive To Stay Alive giving a presentation at Westlake High School.

Phillips summarized the education approach as following the same example of the “Buckle Up” program. Children were encouraged in grade schools to buckle up while driving. It’s the same idea with the “No Zone”, kids go home and tell their parents to buckle up or be Truck Smart and less accidents happen.

The division of Motor Carriers will be at the The Great Salt Lake Truck Show August 16-17 at Thanksgiving point. A booth about Truck Smart and Drive to Stay Alive will be on display with pamphlets and further information.

TruckSmart: http://www.udot.utah.gov/trucksmart

Drive To Stay Alive: http://www.udot.utah.gov/drivetostayalive/

In recent years UDOT has been able to implement innovative bridge building techniques but do you know what the impetus for this was? It started with innovative contracting. By utilizing these types of contracts we are able to involve the construction industry earlier for more efficient delivery of our projects.

Colorado River Bridge

The Colorado River Bridge project was completed using DBB. A specialty designer was hired and then also contracted to assist with inspection during construction.

We use three basic contract types: design-bid-build (DBB), design-build (DB) and construction manager/general contractor (CMGC). Each has its own benefits and risks and UDOT project managers, in coordination with UDOT senior leaders, determine early on what type of contract will meet the needs of their project and ultimately provide the best product (aka road, bridge, etc.).

Design-Bid-Build

DBB is our traditional method of contracting and is the most familiar to everyone. With these contracts a designer completes their part of the process before a construction contractor is involved. Basically, the name explains it all: first the design is completed, then it is put out for bid and finally a contractor is selected to build the project. The majority of our projects use this type of contract.

Geneva Road

It was determined that we could get a better price using DB on the Geneva Road project by allowing the contractor to propose the most efficient design while maximizing the available funding.

Design-Build

DB came about as a result of the 2002 Winter Olympics. The executive director at the time was Tom Warne and I-15 needed to be improved through Salt Lake County to meet the increased demands the Olympics would put on the highway. To meet the tight timeline Mr. Warne worked with legislators to allow UDOT to use a new method of contracting, design-build.

DB contracts allow for the design and construction to be completed under one contract. The contractor actually manages the design and construction, and is involved from the beginning. This means the company that will be building the project is part of the discussion as elements of the project are designed. Because of this early contractor involvement, the time frame for a project is greatly reduced. Contractor involvement is also what has brought about innovations such as bridge moves; who better to bring new ideas to the table than the one who will be putting them into practice.

S.R. 14 Equipment

A landslide took out S.R. 14 and made it impassable. In order to have the most innovative design, and to get construction started right away, CMGC was selected. This also allowed us to develop a design utilizing equipment the contractor proposed.

Construction Manager/General Contractor

CMGC is somewhat similar to DB in that it also shortens the timeline between design and construction and allows for innovation since the contractor is involved from the beginning. The difference is that the contractor is involved during the design process as part of a team managed by UDOT, working alongside a design consultant. Another difference is that while the contractor may continue on past design into construction, if they meet all of the requirements, we also reserve the right to sever the contract once the design is complete making it a design-bid-build.

CMGC allows us to use some of the positive elements from both DBB and DB. The idea for this came from the building industry and we saw it used on a transportation project by the city of Phoenix, Arizona in 2004. Following the success of DB we wanted to include another innovative contracting method.

In the end our goal is to provide our project managers with options so that they can build the best project possible. These innovative contracting methods allow them to select a delivery process that keeps low bid in the forefront, but that also allows for new ideas and practices to emerge.

Note from author: Special thanks to Michelle Page, Project Controls and Innovative Contracting Engineer, and Michael Butler, Contract Administrator, for their help with this post.

July 9th, 2013

UDOT Traffic App Tutorial

No Comments, Optimize Mobility, by Sarah Stephenson.

Wouldn’t it be nice to have access to all of Utah’s weather, traffic information, major construction and road delays? Fortunately the Utah Department of Transportation has made this possible through a smart phone application called “UDOT Traffic”.

The traffic app has several different features which include a detailed map, alerts, road weather and mountain pass information. All of this data comes from the UDOT Traffic Operations Center (TOC) which provides 24/7 monitoring for roads around the state.

Here is a step by step tutorial of how to utilize the app’s features and information.

The map contains several different options that include: cameras, incidents/planned events, construction, overhead freeway signs otherwise know as Variable Message Signs (VMS) and traffic congestion. With your smart phone you can zoom to common locations, search a certain address or use your current location.

Areas of Utah can be selected based on common locations as well as being searched.

Areas of Utah can be selected based on common locations and searched as well.

Specific symbols can be selected or deselected to find a specific camera, construction zone, sign or alert.

Specific symbols can be selected or deselected to change what is visible on your map.

This map of Utah contains symbols representing cameras, construction sites, alerts, and VMS signs.

This map of Utah contains symbols representing cameras, construction sites, alerts, and VMS.

Map with just construction.

Here is a map with all the construction sites listed in Utah. By selecting a specific barrel, details can be found about the place, duration and lane closure information.

A camera view from US-6.

This is a camera view from U.S. 6 but other highways are available on the UDOT Traffic map. Camera images are updated regularly and include a time stamp so you know how recent the image is.

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VMS can also be viewed from the app. These show current travel times between the sign and certain locations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alerts are the second feature available from the main menu across the bottom and contain advice and warning information regarding emergencies, TravelWise, road conditions, incidents, special events, construction and seasonal roads.

An example of an alert with information on the locations and nature of the incident

Details on each alert can be accessed from a list or viewed on the map.

An example of an alert with information on the locations and nature of the incident

This is an example of an incident alert on the map. It contains information on the location, nature of the incident and impact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The third main feature of the app is all about weather. This section contains travel advisories, available during the winter months, as well as road forecasts and reports directly from our weather stations. Road forecasts and weather station data are available all year.

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Travel advisories, weather stations and road forecasts are available in the Weather section of UDOT Traffic App.

This is an example of a Road Forecast that will update every 3 hours with current weather.

Road Forecasts are created by TOC meteorologists and have details broken down in 3 hours increments up to 24 hours in advance.

The Weather Stations display graphs and data for what to expect concerning temperature, wind, dew point etc.

The Weather Stations option displays graphs and data directly from RWIS around the state. This includes temperature, wind, dew point, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The final portion of the app includes Mountain Passes. Mountain Passes are often impacted first by incoming weather. To help travelers understand what they will encounter in these areas we have consolidated them into one part of the app.

 A list of all the mountain passes in Utah are available in this section of the app.

A list of all the mountain passes in Utah are available in this section of the app.

Once a mountain pass is selected information with cameras and weather is available.

Once a mountain pass is selected information specific to that area, including cameras and weather forecasts, are available.

A camera view of Sardine Summit mountain pass.

A camera view of Sardine Summit mountain pass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are some tips and tricks to navigating UDOT ‘s Traffic App. The application is available for iPhone and Android devices and can be downloaded for free through your smart phone’s app store.  For more information on how UDOT receives data and traffic information check out this blog written about UDOT’s  Traffic Operations Center. http://blog.udot.utah.gov/2013/06/optimizing-mobility-udots-traffic-management-division/