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NEW CROSSWALK

A new cross walk with multiple signal phases is now in operation in North Salt Lake.

A new cross walk is in operation on Highway 89 at 800 West in North Salt Lake, Utah. A Federal Highways Administration study of the HAWK showed “yielding percentages above 95 percent."

The new crossing, a High intensity Activated crossWalk – called a HAWK – was designed in Tucson, Arizona appropriate for use at high volume or wide arterial streets with minor street intersections. HAWKs gives drivers “multiple cues to emphasize the potential presence of a pedestrian,” according to a Federal Highways Administration study that tested the effectiveness and safety of the HAWK. The study found that the yield rate is high due to those multiple visual cues.

The HAWK crossings include prominent pavement markings, signage and red and yellow lights on an over-the-roadway arm. When not is use, the lights are dark. Just like regular crosswalks, HAWKs are triggered when a pedestrian pushes a button. First, double yellow flashing lights, then solid yellow lights are activated to warn drivers to stop. The yellow phase is followed by two solid red lights to signal traffic to stop.

Pedestrians are then given the walk symbol followed by a countdown showing how many seconds remain in the walk phase. During the count-down, a flashing red light warns oncoming motorists to come to a full stop – motorists can proceed after a full stop if pedestrians are out of the crosswalk.

The FHWA study of the HAWK showed that “yielding percentages above 95 percent for the HAWK treatment, even on major streets with multiple lanes or higher speeds.”

Although the study also mentions that drivers are most likely to fail to yield during the flashing red phase. “Some drivers don’t seem to know what to do,” during the flashing red phase says Larry Montoya, a Traffic and Safety engineer at UDOT. Drivers encountering a flashing red signal on any roadway location should first come to a full stop, make sure the way is clear, and then proceed.

At a HAWK, drivers should come to a full stop and make sure pedestrians have cleared the crosswalk before continuing on. The flashing red phase is a way to balance the needs of pedestrians while limiting traffic delay.

ZONE DEFENSE

Three out of four work zone crashes are caused by drivers.

UDOT limits construction delay as much as possible but some delay is inevitable. Use UDOT Traffic to check your route and leave early or take an alternate route.

It’s road construction time, and UDOT has over 200 active work zones.  The most important thing drivers should remember is to “slow down and pay extra attention when driving through a work zone, especially this year when we have so many projects,” said UDOT spokesman Nate McDonald in an article in the Standard Examiner.

An Associated General Contractors of America survey found that 68 percent of contractors said that motor vehicles crashed into their construction work zones during the past year. The same study also found that work zone crashes are more likely to kill construction workers than vehicle operators.

“Any time your job site is just a few feet away from fast moving traffic, things can get a little too exciting,” said Tom Brown, chairman of AGC’s national highway and transportation division. “Since construction workers don’t get the option of wearing seatbelts, they are more likely to be killed in a work zone crash than motorists are,” he stressed.

When driving in work zones, remember to manage your speed, your space and your stress. Here are some great tips:

  1. Slow Down when approaching all work zones. You will be in the work zone quicker than you think.
  2. Follow Posted Speed Limits, especially within construction zones, and try to maintain a consistent speed with the traffic flow. And adjust your speed for weather conditions.
  3. Don’t Resume Normal Speed until you see roadway signs indicating it’s safe to do so.
  4. Leave braking room, at least two car lengths, between your vehicle and the one ahead of you. The most common crash in a highway work zone is a rear-end collision.
  5. Keep a safe distance between your vehicle and traffic barriers, trucks, construction equipment and workers.
  6. Don’t pass on the shoulder or drive across the median – doing so creates a very dangerous situation for you, workers and other motorists.
  7. Watch out for tailgaters and don’t force tailgaters to back off by slamming on your brakes or reducing your speed significantly.
  8. Stay calm and don’t rush. Construction zone inconvenience means that improved roads are soon to come.
  9. Pay attention and avoid distractions like cell phones or the radio.
  10. UDOT limits construction delay as much as possible but some delay is inevitable. Use UDOT Traffic to check your route and leave early or take an alternate route.

I-15 CORE’S “OLD FAITHFUL”

By Aaron Mentzer, I-15 CORE Social Media Manager

Drivers on I-15 in Springville may have noticed a large fountain of water gushing into the air like a geyser west of the freeway in early March.

Water from Hobble Creek is pumped into the air near I-15 in Springville. Photo courtesy I-15 CORE.

All of the water flowing into Hobble Creek — approximately 20,000 gallons per minute — was pumped through five 12-inch-diameter pipes a few hundred feet downstream while I-15 CORE construction crews installed a new box culvert to allow the creek to pass under I-15.

“The existing culvert was just too small to handle the quantity of water in the creek,” said Ray Stillwell, Environmental Compliance Manager for I-15 CORE contractor Provo River Constructors (PRC). “It was almost always full, with no additional capacity to deal with runoff or heavy rainfall. The new culvert is much wider and includes two additional overflow culverts adjacent to the main box to accommodate higher-than-normal flows.”

Rerouting a creek or canal is common in construction, but this was not a typical case. Hobble Creek is a key spawning site for the endangered June sucker, which is only found in Utah Lake and its tributaries. Farther downstream, the creek

Five pumps were used to reroute Hobble Creek during construction: four operating at all times and one spare in case of high water flows. Photo courtesy I-15 CORE (Click to enlarge)

channel had recently been reconstructed by the Utah Transit Authority, in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources (UDNR) and Bio-West, to create the Hobble Creek Wetland Mitigation Site. PRC needed to divert the creek in a way that (a) followed the existing channel as much as possible; (b) prevented erosion and sedimentation within the wetland mitigation site downstream; and (c) preserved the June sucker’s spawning habitat.

To solve this problem, the CORE team developed a creative solution. They installed five pumps in the creek with 12-inch outlet pipes to route Hobble Creek around the new box culvert and into the existing channel. Ninety-degree elbows were attached at the end of the five pipes so the high-pressure flow of water exiting the pipes would be directed upward, minimizing erosion and sediment generation.

During design and construction of the new channel, PRC coordinated with UDNR and Bio-West, and the resulting design limited wetland impacts to a much smaller area. “Working with these other agencies, we were able to re-build the channel in a way that minimizes impacts and maintains or enhances the spawning areas for the June Sucker,” Stillwell said.

Workers installed carefully selected, native rock at different locations in the channel as well as in the box culvert itself to restore the habitat in the new creek bed. With the channel reconstruction and rock placement completed, workers removed the temporary upstream dam, and water began flowing through the new culvert last month.

“This new culvert is a great example of the cooperation and innovation taking place throughout the I-15 CORE project,” said Mike Brehm, I-15 CORE Environmental Manager. “Parties from several agencies worked together to construct this culvert in a way that actually benefits the environment.”

The completed culvert with Hobble Creek flowing in its new permanent location. Photo courtesy I-15 CORE.

PROJECT ROADWAY

A UDOT engineer with an eye for safety wants construction workers to wear his attention-getting shirts. 

Hexagons retro-reflect light and minimize a barrel chest.

Workers who build maintain roads and bridges are required to wear clothing that is brightly colored with retroreflective bars meant to make workers visible to drivers during the day and especially at night. Sam Grimshaw, a UDOT Field Engineer, has come up a new idea for clothing that he thinks will make workers even more conspicuous.

The issue as he sees it is that the commonly used clothing makes workers look similar to traffic control devices – the cones and barrels that delineate a construction zone. Instead of the typical horizontal and vertical stripes, Grimshaw placed retroreflective hexagons on bright orange fabric.

To prove his point about how workers can look barrel-chested, he took photos of workers wearing the typical shirts and his shirts at night.

Commonly worn clothing has bars and colors that make workers look similar to traffic control devices. Grimshaw's photos show the contrast between the typical and his design on the left.

He showed his prototype shirts to fabricators who said the new designs could be put into production without any trouble.

Grimshaw’s idea seems to have merit – however, the new clothing needs to have the appropriate review and approval before workers can make the switch.

SHAKE OUT UDOT

To test readiness for dealing with damage from a quake, UDOT participated in a scripted simulation along with the state Emergency Operations Center at the State Capitol.

As simulated earthquake damage was reported, GIS experts at UDOT began building an online map showing the damage to the transportation system. Emergency Operations Center participants at the state capitol could view the map in real time as changes were made.

In the aftermath of an earthquake, UDOT employees will be responsible to make sure the transportation system is safe. The first step in that process is assessing damage to roads and bridges. As part of the Shake Out earthquake drill, UDOT used a United States Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards software program called ShakeCast to generate estimated damage information for roads and bridges.

GIS, Electronic Asset Management and communication experts gathered in one room to interact with the state EOC at the state capitol. Minutes after the quake drill at 10:15 today, scripted calls and email started arriving at the UDOT Traffic Operations Center. As simulated damage was reported, GIS experts began building a map showing the simulated damage to the transportation system. EOC participants at the state capitol could view the map in real time as changes were made. The UDOT participants used a color coded system to identify critical routes and the status of each route.

While UDOT does not anticipate extensive damage to the transportation system, some damage will occur. And, uncertainty exists when it comes to events, such as crashes or power outages and how those events will affect the transportation system.

“We are one of the critical infrastructure owners,” says Chris Siavrakas, Emergency Management Coordinator at UDOT. Transportation, along with other critical systems, including energy, water and health care, is part of an interdependent system. The simulation was good practice for what would occur in the first several hours after an earthquake.

ROAD RESPECT 2012

Cyclists and motorists will tour the state to spread good will, safety education and family fun.

Mike Loveland, pictured second from the left, is an avid cyclist and a lieutenant with the Utah Highway Patrol. He sees the Road Respect campaign as a way to promote a cooperation and consideration between cyclists and motorists.

For the second year, avid cyclists with the Road Respect Tour will travel through the state and stop for rallies that celebrate respect between cyclists and motorists.  “Road Respect, Cars & Bikes Rules to Live By” is a grassroots campaign that seeks to encourage safe practices and good relationships between motorists and cyclists. The centerpiece of the campaign is a six day 509 mile ride through the state that will take place June 4-9.

Mike Loveland

Thirty cyclists representing law enforcement, public safety, transportation and bicycle advocacy will stop along the tour route to join community rallies meant to educate the public about rules for sharing the road. Local cyclists are encouraged to join the cyclists on their route and ride with them into the rallies.

Activities at the rallies will include bike rodeos, helmet give-aways, street and trail rides and speakers. Some of the rallies will include mini car shows. Participants will be encouraged to sign a pledge to signify compliance with obeying rules of the road.

Mike Loveland is an avid cyclist and a lieutenant with the Utah Highway Patrol. He participated as a cyclist last year and is helping to plan this year’s tour. Because of his job and his pastime, Loveland sees both sides of the issue.

The Road Respect campaign and tour is a way to encourage a “get-along attitude” between cyclists and motorists, he explains. Cooperation and consideration is necessary since both groups, according to Loveland “own a piece of the road.”

For more, read an article in Cycling Utah Magazine.

MORE GREEN

UDOT’s Continuous Flow Intersections have been used to enhance east-west traffic mobility in Salt Lake County.

CFI’s provide more green-light time by eliminating potential points of conflict. Watch this new video to see how the innovative configuration can increase the number of cars moving through an intersection by up to 70 percent.

HIGH MARKS

Pavement markings are a critical safety element on Utah roads and UDOT Central Maintenance is continually looking for ways to improve the way markings perform.

Retroreflective glass beads in pavement markings show up at night when headlights illuminate the pavement.

Pavement markings are divided into three categories:

  • Roadway striping, including lane and shoulder markings
  • Messages that provide information such as school zones
  • Islands or islands and parking lots

Most of UDOT’s efforts and costs are aimed at maintaining over 58 thousand centerline miles of lane markings. UDOT’s goal is to paint all lane markings ever year. Long distances and other maintenance duties make that effort a challenge. Region maintenance employees establish a visual quality level goal on each route, and then evaluate markings using an A through F grade against the goal. The worst markings are painted first.

Years of UDOT research has shown that recessing paint slightly below the pavement helps markings last three to five times longer because markings are less vulnerable to snow plows. UDOT Region Two Pavement Maintenance Coordinator Dan Betts has pioneered a method of cutting into the pavement slightly to recess the area slightly below the pavement surface.

Diagram

Betts and UDOT Maintenance Planning Engineer Ken Berg are trying different types of retroreflective glass beads added to the paint to find the best solution for improving visibility of markings at night and in the rain. The markings are made up of two elements – paint that acts as a binder and glass beads that are applied to the paint while wet. A variety of glass beads are available, all with slightly different properties. Berg and Betts are evaluating several types of beads to see which ones work best at night and in the rain.

“We are constantly looking for new products and technologies that are both cost effective and provide long term durability,” writes Berg in a new Pavement Marking White Paper on the topic. “We are asking pavement marking suppliers to apply a product of their choice and guarantee that it will perform for a 5 year period. Our intent is to eliminate yearly public impact from striping operations by providing the best pavement markings we can with minimal disruption to traffic.”

SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROLL

UDOT is participating in the Shake Out, an earthquake preparedness event planned for April 17, 2012.

Over 700 thousand people in Utah have signed on to drop, cover and hold on during a one minute drill that’s part of the Shake Out. Utah is an active seismic region – that information is commonly known. What residents may not know is how to properly seek protection during the time an earthquake is occurring.

The designated time for the earthquake drill is 10:15 a.m. for the state of Utah. All Utah residents are being encouraged by organizers to participate in a drop, cover and hold on drill. Some organizations, UDOT included, will participate in extended earthquake preparedness exercises.

Drop, cover and hold on

Taking cover under a sturdy table or desk is the best strategy in an earthquake.

The primary threat from earthquakes is the intense shaking that can cause structures like office buildings and schools to partially or fully collapse. When that shaking occurs, the safest place to be is under a heavy object like a desk or table. Rescuers who respond to earthquakes find victims in “survivable voids” created when people duck under a sturdy object.

Participating in the drill “builds muscle memory” explains Chris Siavrakas, UDOT’s Emergency Management Coordinator. “Panic is not knowing what to do,” so doing the drill even once makes it more likely that a person will quickly drop, take cover and hold on when the earth really starts to shake.

Another part of the Shake Out drill is situational awareness that can occur before drill. Siavrakas hopes employees will ask themselves “what hazards are around me?” UDOT employees work all over the state in office buildings, on work sites, and many spend many hours each day driving for work. Each employee should think about various work locations and visualize what could happen during an earthquake, and then plan the safest place to drop, cover and hold on.

CROSSING SAFELY

At-grade crossings give trains and cars a place to meet up – and not in a good way. Vic Saunders, Public Involvement Manager at UDOT Region One is actively promoting rail safety by giving presentations at area schools.

Kent Brown, Vic Saunders Kent Jorgenson, Ahmad Jaber Andrew Glad, Philip Lavorgna and Walt Webster received awards from Operation Lifesaver. See the post below for more information about award recipients.

Saunders is a certified presenter for Operation Lifesaver, a rail safety organization that was formed in Idaho. After a successful short term public awareness campaign, state officials found that fatalities fell in Idaho by 43 percent. Other states adopted the program – Utah was third – and now the organization operates across the country. Saunders is one of several presenters from UDOT and other organizations, including the Utah Transit Authority.

Whether walking or driving, it’s imperative to maintain good situational awareness at train crossings. Young people can be prone to walk or drive distractedly by paying attention to friends, texting or listening to music. Saunders has spent hundreds of hours in drivers ed classes talking about why paying attention is so critical.

“You are forty percent more likely to die on a highway at a railroad crossing that at any other place,” says Saunders. He was recently honored as a Safety Partner of the Year by Operation Lifesaver for giving presentations. Last year, Saunders gave sixty-two presentations that reached nearly three thousand people, “most of them 16 year old kids getting ready to go out and drive.”

The videos for the presentations are shockingly straight forward and show images and video of actual crashes. Saunders believes that “it gets their attention” to see the real images. “They all think it’s going to be somebody else.”

Congratulations to Saunders and other award winners!

Persons in photo from left to right:

Kent Brown – Utah Central Railway, 2nd Runner-up Safety Partner Presenter of the Year, gave 24 presentations to 1,031 people

Vic Saunders – Utah Department of Transportation, 1st Runner-up Safety Partner Presenter of the Year, gave 62 presentations to 2,662 people

Kent Jorgenson – Utah Transit Authority, Safety Partner of the Year, gave 98 presentations to 3,255 people

Ahmad Jaber – Utah Department of Transportation, State Coordinator’s Award of Excellence, The state coordinator’s award of excellence is given to an individual or an organization that has demonstrated excellence in participating in or supporting the Operation Lifesaver program through activity, in-kind support, and/or financial contributions.

  • Managed the Operation Lifesaver Utah program since 1976 (year started in Utah) to 1996.
  • Provided a full-time person as the first state coordinator, who was Lillian Witkowski
  • Provides personnel to give Operation Lifesaver presentations to the public
  • Contributes financially to the Operation Lifesaver Utah program on an annual basis

Andrew Glad, Volunteer Presenter of the Year, gave 106 presentations to 3,408 people

Philip Lavorgna, 1st Runner-up Volunteer Presenter of the Year, gave 78 presentations to 2,195 people

Walt Webster, 2nd Runner-up Volunteer Presenter of the Year, gave 70 presentations to 2,363 people