Category Archives: Uncategorized

I-215, I-15 Freeway Closures Scheduled Sunday and Monday

Drivers on I-215 and i-15 through Salt Lake City be warned, several closures over the weekend may impact travel. The closures will primarily be at night, but drivers should still be aware and plan for alternate routes if they’ll be going through those areas.

I-215 is scheduled to be closed in both directions near 600 South on Sunday, June 26, at 7 a.m.

The freeway will be closed for approximately 20 minutes while Rocky Mountain Power crews hang new power lines across the road. Drivers heading to the Salt Lake City International Airport should allow extra time or consider using I-15 to I-80 as an alternate route.

I-15 in Springville will be closed on Monday night, June 27. Crews are scheduled to close all northbound lanes on I-15 at the 1400 North interchange (Exit 261) around midnight to install the crossbar for a new overhead message sign. All northbound lanes are expected to reopen by Tuesday, June 28, at 2 a.m. During this closure, all traffic will be detoured onto S.R. 75. Detour signs will direct drivers back to northbound I-15 via U.S. 89 and 1860 South in Provo.

In addition, UDOT advises drivers to plan ahead for the following projects:

I-80, Salt Lake City: Eastbound I-80 will be reduced to one lane, and westbound I-80 will be reduced to three lanes, between 1300 East and State Street for pavement repairs on Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights during the following times:

Friday, June 24, at 8 p.m. to Saturday, June 25, at 9 a.m.
Saturday, June 25, at 8 p.m. to Sunday, June 26, at 10 a.m.
Sunday, June 26, at 7 p.m. to Monday, June 27, at 5 a.m.

I-215 West Belt, Salt Lake City: The ramp from southbound I-215 to eastbound S.R. 201 is scheduled to close for up to 30 days beginning on Monday, June 27, as early as 1 a.m. Drivers are encouraged to plan ahead and use alternate routes, such as I-80.

During the closure, crews will reconstruct the ramp, completely removing the existing pavement and replacing it with new concrete. This work is being completed as part of the I-215 reconstruction project, which will repave the freeway between S.R. 201 and 4700 South with new concrete and add new exit-only lanes in both directions.

Construction schedules are weather-dependent and subject to change. For additional information on traffic restrictions during construction, visit the UDOT Traffic website (udottraffic.utah.gov) or download the UDOT Traffic app for iPhone or Android. Drivers can also follow UDOT on social media including Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

#WorkForUs Wednesday for April 20, 2016

We’ve got three new job openings for today’s #WorkForUsWednesday. All three of these seasonal general maintenance worker positions  have multiple vacancies and will be open until all positions are filled.

  • Recruitment #08376 – Seasonal General Maintenance Worker 1 (General Maintenance Worker 1), Region 2 – Salt Lake County
  • Recruitment #08377 – Seasonal General Maintenance Worker 1 (General Maintenance Worker 1), Region 2 – Summit County
  • Recruitment #08378 – Seasonal General Maintenance Worker 1 (General Maintenance Worker 1), Region 2 – Tooele County

Visit the Utah State Jobs website to actually apply for these position. Simply filter the search criteria by department to (810) Department of Transportation, and you’ll be on your way.

We hope to see you proudly wearing UDOT orange soon.

Slow Down for National Work Zone Safety Week

Work Zone

We are teaming up with the Association of General Contractors to celebrate National Work Zone Safety Week by reminding drivers to slow down and focus on the road, especially in work zones.

In 2015, a total of 2,849 motor vehicle crashes occurred in Utah work zones, resulting in 10 deaths. According to the Federal Highway Administration, speeding was a factor in 29 percent of all fatal work zone crashes in 2014, while distracted driving contributed to 16 percent. Currently there have been zero fatalities in Utah work zones in 2016.

“We are doing everything we can to keep our work zones safe for those who travel through them and those who work in them. But there’s only so much we can do. We need the public’s help,” said UDOT Executive Director Carlos Braceras. “Slow down, put down the phone, be alert, and obey the laws – especially when driving through a work zone.”

In addition, UDOT release a 30-second PSA to remind drivers of the risks UDOT workers face every day in the work zone. The PSA is told from the perspective of UDOT employees’ children, who want to see their parents come home safe every night.

“Work zones are places where real people do their jobs every day,” said Rich Thorn, president and CEO of the Associated General Contractors. “They have families and other people who care about them and want to see them come home safe. Knowing that should motivate drivers to be alert and slow down in work zones.”

Safety is the number one priority for each of UDOT’s more than 150 projects this year.  For example, the Point project requires every employee to participate in weekly safety training. Also, to further protect it’s 1,500 employees from traffic, crews placed more than 24 miles of concrete barrier, which is 50 percent more than the contract required, as this barrier provides a safer work zone for employees.

Work zones are dynamic places that can change from minute to minute. UDOT urges drivers to be safe and help reach Zero Fatalities by:

  • Driving the posted speed limit.
  • Paying 100 percent attention to the roadway, as lanes are often narrowed and shifted for construction.
  • Eliminating distracting activities, such as changing radio/music, using mobile devices (surfing, tweeting, talking, texting), eating and drinking, putting on makeup, and reaching while driving.
  • Minimizing lane changes within the work zone.
  • Merging into the proper lane well before reaching a lane closure.
  • Watching out for workers and their equipment in the work zone, as they can be especially hard to see at night.

UDOT encourages drivers to check the UDOT Traffic App (available for Android and Apple devices) to view current traffic conditions, locate work zones, or plan the best route before travel. Drivers are also encouraged to TRAVELWise around freeway construction by adjusting schedules to travel during less-congested times of day. Drivers can also take transit or telework to skip congestion and work zones.

The U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration celebrate National Work Zone Safety Week each spring to bring national attention to motorist and worker safety in work zones. UDOT continues to participate in this observance in order to raise driver awareness, protect employees and reach Zero Fatalities in work zones.

I-215 Reconstruction Ranks No. 1 on UDOT’s 2016 Top 10 Projects list

Major projects will widen freeways, maintain highways and build new roads to keep Utah moving

Today we announced our Top 10 Projects list for the 2016 construction season. At the top of the list is the $105 million reconstruction of I-215 in western Salt Lake County, which is scheduled to begin in May and to be completed late next year.

More than 150 projects are scheduled this season statewide to improve mobility now and in the future. These construction projects are designed to enhance safety for drivers and pedestrians, improve the flow of traffic and keep Utah’s roads in good condition.

Three projects in this year’s Top 10 are in western Salt Lake County, an area that has seen tremendous population growth. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, three western Salt Lake County cities are among the fastest growing municipalities in the state (South Jordan, West Jordan and Herriman).

The following are UDOT’s Top 10 Projects for 2016:

#1 I-215—300 East to S.R. 201, $105 million (Construction starts May 2016; scheduled completion fall 2017) 

UDOT’s top project this season will reconstruct the I-215 west belt with new concrete pavement from S.R. 201 to 4700 South. Crews will repave the westbound lanes with new asphalt from 300 East to Redwood Road. In addition, this project will widen the freeway to add auxiliary lanes from S.R. 201 to 4700 South, and will reconstruct the two bridges over S.R. 201. All four lanes will remain open in the peak travel direction during commute hours, but motorists should plan for delays and consider alternate routes such as Bangerter Highway and I-15.


#2 I-15—The Point Project, $252 million (Construction continues from last season; scheduled completion this fall)

Crews continue widening the freeway and placing new concrete pavement on I-15 from 12300 South to S.R. 92. Major construction this season will happen primarily between 12300 South and Bangerter Highway, with finish work taking place at the southern end of the project area from Bangerter Highway to S.R. 92.


#3 Mountain View Corridor—5400 South to 4100 South, $180 million (Construction started in March; scheduled completion fall 2017)

UDOT is extending Mountain View Corridor farther north to 4100 South. This new construction will include two lanes in each direction, separated by a wide median (similar to the current open segment of Mountain View Corridor).

#4 I-15—Farr West to Brigham City, $52 million (Construction started in March; scheduled completion this fall)

Crews are widening a 13-mile section of I-15 to add a lane in each direction from 2700 North in Farr West to U.S. 91 in Brigham City. Most work is taking place in the freeway median, and traffic delays are expected to be minimal. This widening will improve traffic flow in the area.

#5 Bangerter Highway—600 West Interchange, $48 million (Construction starts this month; scheduled completion spring 2017)

UDOT is constructing a new freeway-style interchange on Bangerter Highway at approximately 600 West. This new interchange will enhance safety and reduce traffic congestion in the area near Bangerter Highway and I-15. UDOT is in the middle of a multi-year process to upgrade Bangerter Highway by replacing many of its existing intersections with interchanges, which will improve traffic flow.

#6 I-15—Hill Field Road Interchange and TTI, $28 million (Construction continues from last year; scheduled completion summer 2016)

UDOT is reconstructing the I-15 interchange at Hill Field Road, converting it to a single-point urban interchange to improve traffic flow and reduce delays in Layton. Last season, UDOT constructed new ThrU Turn Intersections on Hill Field Road on each side of I-15.


#7 I-15—St. George Blvd. to Green Springs Drive, $24 million (Construction starts this summer; scheduled completion late 2016)

Crews are adding two lanes in each direction to I-15 in St. George and building new underpasses to connect Red Cliffs Drive with Red Hills Parkway near Mall Drive. These new lanes will help meet the needs of the growing population in the St. George area, and make it easier for drivers to enter and exit I-15.


#8 I-15—Riverdale to Farr West, $14 million (Construction starts this summer; scheduled completion fall 2017)

UDOT is repaving I-15 in Weber County from the I-84 junction to 2700 North in Farr West. This new pavement will prolong the life of the freeway and provide a smoother ride for drivers.


#9 U.S. 189—Deer Creek Widening, $13 million (Construction starts this month; scheduled completion summer 2016)

Crews are widening a six-mile segment of U.S. 189 near Deer Creek Reservoir to two lanes in each direction, plus a center turn lane. Currently, U.S. 189 consists of one travel lane in each direction in this area. Adding these lanes will reduce congestion and enhance safety, specifically for recreational travelers.


#10 U.S. 6—Repaving near I-70, $6 million (Construction starts this summer; scheduled completion this fall)

UDOT is repaving a 10-mile section of U.S. 6 near the I-70 junction to improve the road condition for drivers and extend the life of the road surface.

Construction schedules are weather-dependent and subject to change. For the latest information on traffic restrictions during construction, visit udottraffic.utah.gov or download the UDOT Traffic app for iPhone or Android. Drivers can also follow UDOT on social media including Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

 

UDOT to announce Top 15 construction projects for 2015

RedwoodBangerter
Media Contact:
John Gleason
UDOT Public Information Officer
jgleason@utah.gov
Cell: 801-560-7740

February 26, 2015
For Immediate Release

WHAT: Media availability regarding the release of UDOT’s top 15 road construction projects statewide for the 2015 construction season.

WHO: The following will be available for interviews:

  • Carlos Braceras, UDOT executive director
  • Tim Rose, Point project director
  • John Gleason, UDOT public information officer

WHEN: Friday, Feb. 27 at 11:00 a.m.

VISUALS: Construction equipment and barrels.
Broll opportunity on I-15 on the Point project
(please wear appropriate shoes and clothing to enter work site if interested).

WHERE: UDOT’s South Valley Maintenance Shed — 244 West 13800 South in Draper

UDOT, Granger-Hunter Improvement District and Cedar City Partner to Save $500,000

Photo of base and 3 panels of water tank under constructionThe Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) and Granger-Hunter Improvement District (GHD) worked together to relocate to Cedar City a 2 million gallon water tank that was moved to make way for the Mountain View Corridor (MVC). By recycling existing resources, UDOT, GHD and Cedar City saved taxpayers $500,000.

UDOT is currently preparing for the next phase of construction on the Mountain View Corridor from 5400 South to 4100 South in West Valley City. The project needed to relocate an older, steel water tank near 4300 South. The water tank held 2 million gallons of water that proved to be too small for the growing area. UDOT and GHD worked together to build a new, 4 million gallon concrete water tank and built it in the neighborhood adjacent to the future roadway.

Photo of water tank under construction with first rise and base in place.Instead of disposing of the old water tank material, UDOT and GHD researched ways to re-use it. Cedar City was in need of a new water tank and contacted UDOT. The water tank was dismantled and transported to its new location for reassembly.

“We are always looking for ways to create positive outcomes during the construction process,” said Joe Kammerer, MVC Project Director. “This is a great example of government and utility companies working together to save taxpayer money.”

Mountain View Corridor consists of two lanes open in each direction from 16000 South to 5400 South. MVC will eventually be a 35-mile freeway from I-80 in Salt to Lehi Main Street.

If you would like to learn more about the Mountain View Corridor project, visit udot.utah.gov/mountainview. To learn more about Granger-Hunter Improvement District, visit www.ghid.org. To learn more about Cedar City, visit www.cedarcity.org.

Photo of water tank with second rise in place

This guest post was written by the Mountain View Corridor Project Team.

Interactive Projects Map Being Prepared for Public Launch

Screen shot of the interactive map show details about the Pioneer Crossing Exension

A new interactive projects map will utilize existing GIS layers and add project specific detail for use in meetings with local governments and stakeholders

UDOT Region Three is developing an interactive map to display project information in a GIS format.

Region Three will develop and test its use with plans to launch the GIS map as a statewide resource in the future. Internal staff and technical staff may be accustomed to using GIS, but this map is targeted for use with local government officials and other key stakeholders so that people not familiar with GIS can easily find meaningful information in a public-friendly format.

The map will utilize existing GIS layers and add project-specific details, such as concept and final design, for use in meetings with local governments and stakeholders. A limited number of layers will be pre-selected to keep the map interface simple and easy to use for non-GIS users.

The Interactive Projects Map development team is working toward a June launch date in order to begin using this resource through the summer. As we use the map, we will gather feedback from stakeholders and internal staff alike to refine the map and its functionality. An updated version of the map based on initial feedback is targeted to be launched in November. Link to the map from the UDOT Region Three homepage www.udot.utah.gov/go/region3.

2013 Strategic Direction — Part 4

This is the fourth and final post in our series about the 2013 Strategic Direction. Please also check out Part 1: Preserve Infrastructure, Part 2: Optimize Mobility and Part 3: Zero Fatalities.

Strengthen the Economy

This goal recognizes UDOT’s role in creating and managing a transportation system that enables economic growth and empowers prosperity. Investing in major roadway projects in the past few years has paid great dividends. While many cities in the United States show increasing travel times, Utah travel times are decreasing. This is very significant considering the population of Utah has grown 63 percent since 1990.

UDOT is providing a product for future generations. When Utah’s roadways are safe, free of congestion and operate efficiently, Utahns are free to live where they like with a wider selection of jobs. Businesses are also able to reach a wider range of customers and employee base. Success in the first three goals creates a solid foundation for economic growth.

UDOT understands the importance of mobility and its significance for economic growth. Businesses also understand the importance of locating in areas where their product can be distributed quickly and efficiently, and where their employees can benefit from a healthy quality of life.

Everyone benefits from a safe transportation system, including the economy. When a roadway is known to be safe, residents and visitors will be more likely to use it. Safe roads can promote the growth of business along that roadway and the local economy.

For the third year in a row, Forbes magazine has named Utah as the best state in the U.S. for doing business. According to economist, transportation plays a big role in the state’s business environment. Certainly, businesses in Utah are benefiting from the improved mobility on roadways.

In conclusion, UDOT has completed two of the largest projects in our history using only state funds and delivered the largest construction season in our history. Our significant challenge remains. However, the future is bright for transportation as we focus on our four strategic goals.

STRENGTHEN THE ECONOMY

Utah’s Speaker of the House said transportation helps strengthen the economy in opening remarks at the annual UDOT Conference.

Lockhart took time to speak with conference attendees after her remarks.

Speaker Becky Lockhart has an affinity for orange barrels. The large traffic control devices are a sign of road construction “which I love,” she said during lunch time remarks on Monday.

While road construction can make getting around inconvenient temporarily, in the long run, transportation projects help strengthen the economy. Building and maintaining an efficient transportation system helps support commerce, job growth, and helps expand a healthy tax base that can fund critical needs like education, explained Lockhart.

Speaker Lockhart was part of an effort with other lawmakers to examine the way transportation funding was accomplished in the past. “We looked at the past and tried to find a plan to work in the future for the next two decades.” Lockhart said former legislator Marta Dilree, who was a strong advocate for transportation funding, started the effort to evaluate transportation issues years ago.

Lockhart also spoke about the importance of maintaining roads and bridges. Funding maintenance has been made more difficult by the depth and duration of the recession. Ongoing maintenance is important to keeping the transportation system healthy, but articulating that message can be difficult.

Lockhart praised Provo River Constructors, who are building the I-15 CORE project, and said “we got what we wanted and more,” since the project team delivered the requirements of the project efficiently and ahead of schedule. The taxpayers owe the contractors a “debt of gratitude,” said Lockhart.

Speaker Lockhart acknowledged that elected officials have a lot of tough decisions to make when it comes to balancing all the needs of the state. By working together she is confident that decision makers “can make Utah the best place to live and play.”

The UDOT Conference is an annual event that brings employees, contractors and researchers together to share way to improve the transportation system.

SNOW ARSENAL

Tow plows are one way UDOT improves the efficiency of snow removal to keep roads clear during the winter.

UDOT has over 500 trucks that are used to plow roads during winter. Eight of those trucks are equipped with tow plows. When deployed, tow plows swing from the back to the side of the truck and double the amount of snow that can be plowed. Tow plows require trucks with larger motors and tag axles that are capable of handling the large piece of equipment.

UDOT’s fleet is valued at about $200 million dollars – a significant investment of taxpayer money.  UDOT Central Maintenance puts a lot of emphasis on taking care of equipment to make sure trucks and plows work efficiently and have a long useful life.

Many of UDOT’s operators attended a training recently to practice skills and to get a review of how take care of towplows.  The slides below show some of the operating systems on tow plows.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

In addition to adding tow plows to its snow removal arsenal, UDOT has improved the efficiency of feet vehicles by adding wing plows to most of the existing 10 wheeler fleet, by using sanders for spreading de‐icing materials, and by using brine, high performing salts and other liquid anti‐icing agents. Wetting the salt is a much more effective approach for keeping roads clear since dry salt can bounce or blow off the road.

UDOT’s strategic goals, briefly stated, are to preserve infrastructure, optimize mobility, improve safety, and strengthen the economy. Known as the Final Four, the goals provide guidance in all agency departments by articulating the responsibilities UDOT has as to the public.

By maintaining roads and highways, UDOT’s equipment and fleet meet all of the Final Four goals. By preserving infrastructure, UDOT provides a quality transportation system that helps bring industry to the state, which also strengthens the economy. By plowing roads during winter storms, and making repairs that keep roads functioning smoothly, UDOT’s fleet helps optimize mobility and improve safety.