Category Archives: Preserve Infrastructure

HONING OUR FUTURE

UDOT Director John Njord talks to conference attendees

UDOT Director John Njord praised employees and private sector allies for partnering and innovation.

When asked what UDOT does, the general public is most likely to respond by citing the most obvious outward manifestation – road construction projects. “There’s much, much more” when it comes to UDOT’s function than road construction, said Njord. He spoke to employees, private sector contractors and local government transportation officials at the annual UDOT Conference.

While the general public associate construction projects with UDOT, many more activities take place that “don’t get into the limelight.” And all those activities are important to the overall success of the agency. UDOT is finishing the biggest project year ever, and citing that tremendous accomplishment, Njord took the opportunity to cite some of the successes realized by the agency.

Njord gave credit to the whole of the UDOT team, and likened the intrinsic value of every employee to the story of a NASA janitor who, in 1964, was approached and asked about his job. “I’m helping to put a man on the moon” was his quick response. The janitor’s understanding of his role showed a “direct connectedness” to the overall agency mission.

Njord named specific projects too, and went on to relay some feedback from stakeholders. The Mountain View Corridor, SR 14 Landslide Repair, Renovate 80 Wanship Bridge Deck move and the I-15 CORE projects showcase UDOT’s efforts to address the needs of the transportation system. And “the public appreciates the work you do at the department more than you know,” said Njord.

ZERO Fatalities is a new strategic goal.

Njord played video comments given by the public answering questions about UDOT. Responses showed a good understanding of UDOT’s mission. For example, when asked to identify how UDOT helped make life better, responders cited reduced delay from capacity projects and ABC construction techniques.

Njord is optimistic that UDOT will continue to innovate, and said new ideas “will come from those people who are seated in this room right now.” He believes there’s “an inventor trapped inside each one of us,” and stressed that all can help hone UDOT’s future by making good work decisions daily. “You are the standard bearers” for transportation projects across the country, said Njord.

Njord’s presentation, including a change to the Final Four, video highlights of projects and glowing reviews from transportation officials from federal and state governments, has been posted on the UDOT website, and a link to video of his remarks will be available on the UDOT Blog on Friday, November 2.

A CHALLENGE

UDOT Deputy Director Carlos Braceras asked UDOT employees to align personal achievement with agency goals.

Deputy Director Carlos Braceras talks to conference attendees.

Everybody should know and understand UDOT’s mission as expressed by the Final Four – Optimizing Mobility, Preserving Infrastructure, Zero Fatalities and Strengthening the Economy. Knowing and understanding those agency goals are paramount to setting personal goals on individual performance plans. By scrutinizing individual roles, and making sure those roles align with the agency mission, everyone will be pulling in the same direction, said Braceras at the UDOT Conference held this week in Sandy, Utah.

The UDOT website has fresh information about agency performance, and Braceras asked that employees get acquainted with that information. The Performance Dashboard and UDOT Projects are data repositories that can give employees “very, very fresh information,” sometimes hours old, about how UDOT is accomplishing its mission.

Braceras cited each strategic goal and some important UDOT achievements.

Optimizing Mobility: New projects have changed the way people get around and are supporting improved mobility. For example, the Southern Parkway opened up new development potential in Washington County.

Preserving Infrastructure: A new way to fund projects will provide a steady funding for taking care of our transportation investments and make for a more sustainable transportation system.

Zero Fatalities: Safety improvements have resulted in yearly declines in fatalities. Zero Fatalities is UDOT’s goal –“In my heart I believe we can do this,” said Braceras.

Strengthen the Economy: Utah enjoys an efficient and relatively delay-free transportation system compared with other states. Companies looking to relocate operations most likely will consider delay as important.

Carlos praised UDOT and private sector partners. “You guys are the best of the best,” he said.

Braceras’ presentation, including what change means to UDOT, a visual of how to quantify mobility as a way to bolster the economy and the importance of treating customers like family is posted on the UDOT website, and a link to video of his remarks will be available on the UDOT Blog.

SHRP 2

The Strategic Highway Research Program 2 is nearing the end of a long effort to conduct and prioritize research projects.

Some SHRP 2 products address rapid design and construction methods that minimize road user inconvenience and produce long-lived facilities.

Planning for SHRP2 began in 1999, and in 2009, funding for the effort was authorized by Congress. SHRP 2 is intended to address critical needs related to the nation’s highways. Some of the products of that research are nearing completion.

Neil Pedersen, Deputy Director of Implementation for SHRP 2, visited UDOT this week as part of an effort to ask state departments of transportation to “help TRB with the transition from research to implementation.”

SHRP 2 products are process related and address problems facing the nation’s highways in four critical areas:

  • Safety – focuses on ways to prevent or reduce the severity of crashes by understanding the behavior of drivers.
  • Renewal – focuses on rapid design and construction methods that minimize road user inconvenience and produce long-lived facilities.
  • Reliability – focuses on ways to effectively reduce traffic congestion by managing traffic flow and reducing and clearing crashes or other incidents.
  • Capacity – focuses on ways to plan new facilities that improve mobility while meeting the economic and environmental needs of the community.

Sixty five products representing “targeted, short-term, results-oriented research” have been forwarded through a prioritization process. Those products will be taken through the implementation phase by state DOTs after a competitive selection process.

Pedersen described the implementation effort as a “lead state concept” whereby states DOTs take on the process of implementation by demonstrating and evaluating the value, ease of use and usefulness of the products. Once products have been demonstrated successfully, “others will follow,” said Pedersen. The implementation process will take approximately three years for each product.

Pedersen explained that states that have experience in specific areas may have an inside track when it comes to being selected to take the lead. However, rather than taking on a project that has already been implemented, states make a needs-based assessment since states that are chosen will receive funding and technical assistance.

UDOT Deputy Director Carlos Braceras says he and Director John Njord have asked UDOT senior leaders to evaluate projects and determine which ones are the most suitable opportunities for UDOT.

SHRP 2 is managed by the Transportation Research Board on behalf of the National Research Council. FHWA and AASHTO will provide funding and technical support during the implementation process. UDOT Research staff facilitated Pedersen’s visit.

PRECAST PANELS

This post is second in a series about how research supports innovation at UDOT. Many in the transportation community and the general public are familiar with UDOT’s method of building bridges off-site and then moving them into place. Other important innovations garner less attention. See the first post here.

UDOT’s innovative pre-cast pavement panels speed up concrete road repair.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

Precast concrete elements are often used for bridge girders, decks or MSE walls. But using pre-cast panel systems to repair or build pavement is not yet common. UDOT Research Division has partnered with FHWA Highways for Life to develop and demonstrate a design for a precast pavement panels, and so far, “they seem to be working very well,” says UDOT Research Project Manager Daniel Hsiao who oversaw panel testing and design.

The innovation is in the speed of construction, and the non-proprietary design. Using a cast-in-place method involves closing lanes and waiting for concrete to cure before traffic can travel on the pavement.  With pre-cast pavement panels the cure time takes place off site, so traffic lanes can be reopened soon after installation.

The unique design specifies leveling bolts that are commonly used in bridge deck construction. After placement, the bolts are turned against steel panels on the sub-base to achieve correct elevation. Four bolts are placed in each panel during the casting process. Six grout ports are also included in each panel. Using the bolts also means that traffic lanes can be open before the grout is fully cured.

The panels are also designed to be a standard size, 12 by 12 feet square and 9 inches thick.  A standard panel size helps minimize construction costs and simplify installation. The panels are reinforced with steel rebar to support lifting the 17,000 pound panels.

Because the design is non-proprietary, “anybody can use it,” says Hsiao. The non-proprietary aspect helps support a competitive bidding environment, which conserves limited funding.

WETLAND BANKING

A wetland bank can be a successful and accepted way to mitigate for the loss of wetland habitat areas due to transportation projects.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

The EPA s defines a wetland mitigation bank as a “a wetland, stream, or other aquatic resource area that has been restored, established, enhanced, or (in certain circumstances) preserved for the purpose of providing compensation for unavoidable impacts to aquatic resources…” The Water Resources Development Act of 2007 calls mitigation banking “the preferred mechanism for offsetting unavoidable wetland impacts associated with Corps Civil Works projects.” Wetland banks are regulated by the The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service with guidance from the Environmental Protection Agency.

EPA rules call for a “no net loss” policy in compensating for wetlands that are impacted by transportation or other projects. An ecological assessment assures that the bank area is functioning as intended. A credit system, representing the value of the compensation, assures that lost wetlands are adequately compensated for. Banks must be monitored and managed on an ongoing basis to make sure performance standards are met.

UDOT has established a wetland a mitigation area, called the Northern Utah County Mitigation Bank, which compensates for  of transportation project impacts in Utah County, including I-15 CORE and Pioneer Crossing. The NUCMB totals 120 acres and is located in Lindon, Utah. This wetland bank will eventually provide 76 mitigation credits — enough capacity to provide mitigation for any UDOT FHWA transportation project throughout the majority of Utah County .

Advantages of UDOT’s mitigation bank

The NUCMB provided a cost-effective way to mitigate wetland impacts in northern Utah County. Having a mitigation bank also accelerated the permitting process, saving taxpayers millions of dollars and years of time. UDOT, along with private sector partners, worked together throughout the process to design, permit and monitor the NUCMB.

FISH FRIENDLY

This post is first in a series about innovation at UDOT. Many in the transportation community and the general public are familiar with UDOT’s method of building bridges off-site and then moving them into place. Other important innovations garner less attention. Check back for future posts on other innovations at UDOT.

When roads cross streams, culverts need to accommodate fish.

UDOT sponsored research has resulted in a better understanding of how to make sure small native Utah fish can move freely so important fish populations can be maintained.

Research on how successfully fish pass through culverts has resulted knowledge about how to accommodate small non-game native Utah species.

Connectivity between waterways is important to many fish species in Utah, explains Drew Cushing, Utah Department of Wild Life Resources Sport Fish Coordinator.  Culverts can increase stream velocity and prevent fish from spawning, finding food, and escaping temperature extremes from season to season.

The wildlife and transportation community has had a good understanding of how to make culverts passable to large fish. However, less has been known about how to accommodate small fish.  UDOT sponsored research in two phases has resulted in a better understanding of how to make sure small native Utah fish can move freely so important fish populations can be maintained.

The first phase of research was conducted by Lindsay D. Esplin, EIT and Dr. Rollin Hotchkiss of BYU. In a lab setting, Esplin and Hotchkiss tested how different types of substrate affected fish passage rates.  Their findings indicate that placing small rocks, approximately the size of the fish, reduced stream velocity and created places for the fish to pause before continuing to swim. During the experiment, fish were observed stopping, foraging and swimming up and down the rock-lined artificial water way inside the lab.

The second phase of research was conducted in the field near Salina, Utah. Researchers Suzanne Monk, EIT and Hotchkiss conducted fish passage tests by measuring fish population densities at three sites along Salina Creek. All sites had different characteristics including a rock lined culvert, a bare box culvert and a stream section without a culvert. The rock-lined culvert and the stream both contained rocks that were close to the same size as the small fish.

While small fish were able pass through all locations, fish passed through the rock lined culvert more successfully than the bare box culvert. While more research is needed, the field test seemed to clearly confirm that placing small rocks approximately the size of fish inside a culvert allows the fish to pass successfully.

The results of the lab and field test will inform the way UDOT builds new and retrofits in-use culverts.

Next week: Pre-cast panels help speed-up freeway repair.

FASTEST PROJECT

Images and information provided by Andrew Johnson and 24 Salt Lake Traffic.

Construction on the I-15 corridor expansion through Utah County, called I-15 CORE, is still in full-swing, but officials say all lanes could be open as early as Thanksgiving.

The new interchange at University Parkway and I-15. When complete in December, I-15 CORE will be the fastest billion-dollar public highway project ever built in the U.S.

Between January 2010 and May 2012, about 6 million hours have been logged in the I-15 CORE project, which is almost as many hours as it took to construct the Empire State Building in New York.

About 6 million hours have been logged in the I-15 CORE project — almost as many hours as it took to construct the Empire State Building.

“A workforce of nearly 2,000 people has put in those 6 million hours designing, building, and managing the I-15 CORE project,” says UDOT I-15 CORE spokesperson Leigh Dethman in a recent interview. “From surveying, to traffic management, to construction, to quality assurance and oversight, the project has helped spur economic development and job creation during construction.”

When complete in December, I-15 CORE will be the fastest billion-dollar public highway project ever built in the U.S.

Facts about the I-15 CORE construction project

The I-15 CORE project is the largest highway project in Utah history, and crews with Provo River Constructors are reconstructing 24 miles of I-15 through Utah County.

Two additional lanes are being added each direction from Spanish Fork to Lehi. In addition, 10 freeway interchanges and 63 bridges are being replaced or rebuilt, and the Express Lane is being extended from University Parkway in Orem to Spanish Fork.

Here is a look at some project facts as of May 31, 2012:

  • Crews have installed 49 miles of drainage pipeline, which is twice the length of Utah Lake.
  • 269 lane-miles of concrete have been poured, which is enough to build a two-lane highway from Provo to Logan.
  • 7.1 million tons of fill dirt have been excavated and placed, which is enough to fill 13 BYU Marriott Centers.
  • 1.9 million square yards of concrete pavement have been used, which is more than 5 times the amount of pavement used to pour construct the runways at the Salt Lake City International Airport.
  • Nearly 1,600 employees have been working on the management, engineering and construction teams.
  • Nearly 6 million hours of labor have been logged. It took 7 million hours to construct the Empire State Building!

“We’re delivering a complete reconstruction of the freeway that will meet traffic demand through the year 2030, while at the same time we’re using innovation to minimize delays for the traveling public,” says Todd Jensen, UDOT I-15 CORE project director. “Completing I-15 CORE in an unprecedented 35 months represents Utah’s worldwide leadership in innovative road construction.”

Stay up to date with the project by visiting the I-15 CORE website.

READY FOR WINTER

The extensive and careful work done in the Body Shop and Heavy Equipment Shop prolongs the life UDOT’s fleet and conserves funding.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

Mechanics and auto-body workers at UDOT are getting heavy equipment ready for winter. Even though last winter was relatively mild, workers in the shop have plenty to do. With around forty two hundred pieces of heavy equipment in the fleet, work is non-stop.

“Right now, we are doing the things we can’t do in the winter,” says Steve McCarthy, UDOT’s Fleet Manager. By mid September, “mountain areas can get snow any time.” His crew is working with maintenance station supervisors to make sure each crew has the equipment needed to remove snow and ice.

UDOT’s fleet is valued at about $200 million, a significant investment of taxpayer money. Besides repairing fleet vehicles, strategies are being employed to conserve funding and work as efficiently as possible by:

  • Keeping fleet vehicles longer; most are kept between sixteen and eighteen years and some up to twenty.
  • Purchasing trucks with larger motors and tag axles that can handle tow plows and adding wing plows to the 10-wheeler fleet. Tow plows and wing plows remove a wider swath of snow from the roadway and boost efficiency.
  • Using larger sanders to spread de‐icing materials and applying brine, high performing salts and other liquid anti‐icing solutions to remove snow and ice more efficiently.
  • Leasing or renting some heavy equipment which can save repair costs while employing new more efficient technology.

By employing smart fleet strategies, UDOT has been able to maintain high performance standards and eliminate the need to purchase 25 percent more equipment.

JOB CORPS WORKS AT UDOT

Newly trained mechanics are getting work experience at UDOT.

Raymond Bentor, Job Corps Intern at UDOT, rebuilds the a rear suspension in the heavy-duty shop.

Job Corps students that have reached the end of their training program need real-world work experience before they begin their careers. Two young mechanics are getting that opportunity at UDOT’s Central Heavy Duty Shop where they serve as interns. For those interns and the UDOT mechanics that provide supervision, the experience has been very positive.

The success of the UDOT-Job Corps association is due to the excellent training program at Job Corps and the variety and complexity of the work load at Central Maintenance. “Their training is really top notch,” says Rod Andrews, UDOT Heavy Duty Shop Supervisor.  The trainees come to the site ready to do more than busy-work and can be assigned to a variety of big or small tasks. “You find that they fill a little niche that you need,” says Andrews.

Johnnie Brandt removed the transmission from this road grader. “I don’t like just standing around,” says Brandt.

Intern Johnnie Brandt says he is ready and willing to do anything he can get his hands on. “I don’t like just standing around,” says Brandt.  He works with all the mechanics at UDOT to quickly move repair jobs through to completion. Brandt has done jobs ranging from changing oil to removing a transmission from a road grader.

UDOT’s shop is great for providing diverse work experiences.  “Just look at the variety of stuff we have in this shop,” says John Service, UDOT Journeyman Mechanic, as he points to the assortment of heavy equipment undergoing repair. Service has worked closely with Brandt and appreciates his great attitude and willingness to learn.

Intern Raymond Benter has been at other work sites besides UDOT’s shop. He says moving from site to site helps build his skill sets, learn to adapt and “really know what it’s like to work.”

Benter is willing to “get right in there and do his job,” says Truck Shop Supervisor Jeff McCleery. “He’s willing to learn, listen and he has a good skill level and good attitude.”

Interns will spend about six weeks at UDOT before moving to another work site.

FLEETS MOVE FORWARD

A new national performance metric will help fleet managers make decisions about retaining core equipment.

Departments of transportation are facing many of the same issues, including limited budgets, new emissions and mileage regulations and the need to manage life-cycle costs. At the same time, equipment costs are increasing, making it challenging for departments of transportation to replace aging vehicles.

AASHTO’s Equipment Management Technical Services Program recently sponsored the First National Equipment Fleet Management Conference. The event brought experts together to share the best practices from the nation’s departments of transportation. An important outcome of the conference is the development of a national metric that will provide “a high-level snapshot” of how departments of transportation are managing equipment life cycles, according to a problem statement issued by the EMTSP.

Departments of transportation are facing many of the same issues, including limited budgets, new emissions and mileage regulations and the need to manage life-cycle costs. At the same time, equipment costs are increasing, making it challenging for departments of transportation to replace aging vehicles.

UDOT’s Fleet Manager Steve McCarthy is the Vice Chair of the EMTSP. He attended the conference, participated in development of the metric, and is optimistic about what the metric data will provide over time — “more data about whether or when to replace equipment.”

The metric identifies and tracks fleet utilization standards, preventative maintenance compliance, and fleet availability. Departments of transportation from across the nation have different standards and practices. Using one metric to collect data across the nation will help departments of transportation compare agency against agency and identify the most effective strategies for managing fleet life cycles.

The EMTSP is already a resource for best practices and a clearing house for comprehensive, up‐to‐date information about fleet management. With data from the new metric, departments of transportation should be able to further fine tune fleet performance to effectively review life cycle costs, develop funding requests based on real-world needs and readily identify best-practice methods.