Category Archives: Optimize Mobility

CORE OPTIMIZED

The I-15 Corridor Expansion Project is keeping traffic moving during construction.

I-15 CORE crews place concrete pavement near the University Parkway interchange.

As the project owner and the contractor for the I-15 CORE project, UDOT and Provo River Constructors have teamed up to make sure road users are not unnecessarily delayed by construction.

While some delay is inevitable, excessively slow travel is inconvenient for everyone and often expensive for workers and businesses that deliver goods and services. Keeping traffic moving involves a comprehensive planning and coordination effort. Here are some ways the project team reduces construction related delay:

  • Advanced Transportation Management Systems, including ramp meters, traffic cameras, automated signals and traffic monitoring stations, are in place along the construction corridor and on parallel routes. A Traffic Operations Center at the I-15 CORE office allows traffic engineers to observe traffic. When capacity is reduced on I-15, engineers can make adjustments that increase the capacity of key parallel routes.
  • The I-15 CORE project team takes a regional approach use major arterial and state roads as needed to relieve traffic demand on the freeway. Signal timing plans have been created for detours, crashes, and commuter travel. Plans can be adjusted as needed to provide enough green light time for traffic.
  • The UDOT, Orem, and Provo signal systems have been unified to allow coordination across municipal boundaries.
  • Construction has been phased to minimize ramp and lane closures. While lane closures are always necessary during reconstruction projects, minimizing lane closures maintains optimal capacity.
  • Public Involvement Coordinators encourage road users to adopt TravelWise strategies, including alternate work schedules, trip-chaining and use of public transportation, to reduce demand for the freeway. Facebook and Twitter are used to communicate information regarding planned closures as well as traffic incidents so drivers can plan extra travel time or use alternate routes as needed.

Increasing capacity in and around the I-15 CORE project allows UDOT to optimize the level of service available for road users. Minimizing congestion on I-15 and on the parallel streets also reduces the likelihood of crashes.

GET THE MESSAGE?

New air quality messages on overhead freeway signs will prompt road users to make smart travel choices.

The UDOT Traffic Operations Center uses variable message signs on freeways to provide helpful information for road users. Messages about travel times, crashes or other unexpected events and air quality all take turns on the limited but highly visible real estate above the freeway. Limited space means TOC Operators, who have primary control of the signs, need to provide messages that have good utility to road users.

New signs will prompt action on the part of motorists. When DAQ makes the call to notify the public about an upcoming red alert day, UDOT will post messages that are designed to give motorists the chance to adjust travel plans the following day.

 

UDOT has used the VMS to alert the public to air quality conditions since Salt Lake City hosted the Winter Olympics. The alerts are based on data posted on the website Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Air Quality. Utah’s air is monitored by the DAQ – air monitoring stations around the state measure pollutants and that data is compiled to rate the quality of air as yellow or red.

When DAQ makes the call to notify the public about an upcoming red alert day, UDOT will post messages that are designed to give motorists the chance to adjust travel plans the following day. UDOT has evaluated the phrases used on freeway VMS with an eye to providing a useful message that targets commuters and encourages road users to make a decision about how they travel.  The new messages will read in part “For Better Air” followed by an action phrase such as “Avoid Rush Hour Tomorrow.”

Drivers have an array of choices when it comes to travel. UDOT’s TravelWise website is a good source of information for people who want to select appropriate alternatives. TravelWise strategies such as carpooling, tele-commuting, taking public transportation or flexible work schedules can help reduce traffic volume on red air days, as well as help motorists avoid traffic delay and get around more efficiently.

MORE HUMAN

The nation’s only human Traveler Information Meteorologist keeps his eyes on the roads.

Traveler Information Meteorologist Justin Connolly uses sophisticated weather tools and knowledge of location specific weather patterns to forecast weather for road users.

Meteorologists that forecast weather for maintenance or construction activities have been helping UDOT work more efficiently since the mid 1990s. The department has recently added a Traveler Information Meteorologist to focus on weather that affects road users. “UDOT is likely the only state in the U.S. that employs a human traveler information meteorologist, and we are far more successful as a result.” says Weather Information and RWIS Manager Leigh Sturges.

Having a Traveler Information Meteorologist “has greatly improved the quality and quantity of road weather information we provide to motorists,” says Sturges. “The traveler information meteorologist is not only more cost-effective than other strategies, such as automated forecasting systems, but it is also more accurate, because you have a human interpreting and relating weather impacts to motorists, rather than a computer,” says Sturges.  Accurate weather forecasts are most useful during incoming storms, for road users in rural areas and for road users traveling on mountain summits or in rural areas.

UDOT’s Traveler Information Meteorologist Justin Connolly uses sophisticated tools and knowledge specific to the region to forecast weather. Roadway Weather Information System stations spread around the state collect information about air temperature, road temperature, humidity and solar radiation. Some RWIS stations have remote controlled cameras. Mobile stations can be strategically placed where needed. Connolly also uses computer generated probability models that use current weather data to show how weather conditions are trending.

Connolly’s also uses his knowledge of location specific weather patterns to forecast weather all over Utah but especially in high traffic volume areas, canyons and mountain summits. For example, the Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons get the most snow when northwest winds cause storm air to “ride up over the mountain.”

Connolly concentrates on pinpointing the time and duration of “road snow with storms, high winds and cross winds” which are the conditions that affect travelers the most. Road weather forecasts are available for the public on UDOT’s CommuterLink website, the UDOT Traffic app for smart phones, and are sent by tweets. The forecasts provide plenty of reliable information so road users can make good travel decisions.

TOC AWARD

Smart staffing changes have improved efficiency and provided better customer service at Traffic Operation Center.

Making a few smart, customer focused changes has helped improve efficiency at the UDOT's Traffic Operations Center

The UDOT TOC is the nerve center for managing traffic flow across the state. Operators view real-time traffic cameras and computer models that show traffic movement and how signals operate. When problems arise, operators make quick and important decisions to prevent delay, un-snarl traffic and improve safety.

Making a few smart, customer focused changes in the way the group operates has helped improve efficiency at the TOC and in turn, helped reduce delay and improve safety for the traveling public. For improving the TOC, managers Glenn Blackwelder, Chris Siavrakas, Michael Evans have earned a WASHTO Award.

UDOT Director John Njord congratulates TOC Managers for making the TOC more customer centered and efficient

First, managers decided to staff the control room 24 hours a day, 7 days a week so customers can always reach someone an operator. Managers also defined very precise hand-off procedures to maintain communication and consistency from shift to shift.  “By instituting shifts with defined hand-off procedures, we created small, cohesive groups that were selected to work well with each other,” according to Blackwelder.

Managers also increased the number of operators working each shift to three instead of two. With more operators insures that there is always someone to take action – like posting a warning message on the freeway signs – during a crash or other incident that causes delay. One of the three operators is an engineer/operator that helps out with operator tasks as needed but also does engineering work.

“We made the system work better,” says Blackwelder. Making the TOC Control Room work better has helped increase capacity by managing traffic during incidents, and helped improve safety by getting more effective warning messages out to the public more quickly.

HEBER’S SMART SIGNALS

Signals that communicate with each other and adapt in real time are improving travel time in Heber City.

Called ACS Lite, traffic signals in Heber City are optimized in real time as traffic patterns change. Travel times have improved by 7 percent.

Adaptive traffic signals were installed in Heber City, Utah this summer. While most signals are synchronized by time of day with an internal clock and operated through UDOT’s centralized Traffic Operations Center, the new computerized signals adjust automatically to real-time traffic demand. The sophisticated system is providing a corridor with less delay for road users.

Called ACS Lite, traffic signals on the system are optimized automatically as traffic patterns change. Signals at each intersection communicate with each other electronically to provide more green light time or other adjustments as needed. As the system detects more or less traffic, changes are made gradually so road users can benefit from improved travel time in the peak travel direction.

Before installation, traffic on the corridor was over capacity at peak times with waits of 7 to 10 seconds but those wait times have decreased. “It’s almost surprising” to get this degree of improvement in travel time, explains Jamie Mackey, Assistant Signals Engineer for UDOT.

The corridor was working fairly well before the system was installed – signals were adequately spaced and optimized. But data shows that travel time on Main Street (U.S. 40) “has benefited by about 7 percent in every time period” without drastically hurting the cross streets. “A 7 percent gain is pretty impressive,” says Mackey.

The project received funding from FHWA as part of a program to provide systems that improve signal operation and travel time. UDOT is learning from operating the system to gain experience to possibly use ACS Lite for other appropriate locations.

This is a follow-up to a previous post.

TEAM SIGNALS SUCCESS

The hard working Signals Maintenance Team took on increased responsibilities and has delivered improved safety, efficiency and value to UDOT customers.

Region One Signals Team

WASHTO lends support to transportation agencies that have a quality improvement program. Each year, state agencies choose winners according to how those employees support the mission of the agency. UDOT has a committee that judges nominations and selects the team or employees that are most deserving.  UDOT’s program is called Achieving Great Performance. This week and next, blog posts will highlight award winners.

The four-person Signals Maintenance Team from UDOT Region one has responsibility for optimizing and maintaining 325 signals and traffic sensors in the northern part of the state. Keeping signals optimized and operational is demanding and important work. Signals that are not operating correctly can cause delay, inconvenience and sometimes confusion for road users.

Despite the important responsibility to take care of nearly 30 percent of all signals statewide, the Region One Signals Maintenance Team took on the additional responsibility of replacing or updating lighting on all Region One interstates. By performing both areas of responsibility expertly, the Region One Signals Team has earned a Quality Award.

A bright idea

Because of team only consists of four members, a strategic approach was necessary. Team members too stock of the talents and abilities of each group member and executed a divide-and-conquer approach. Two team members took on lighting and two tackled signals. Each service call was handled strategically as well. In order to provide the best use of time per call, team members took care of immediate needs first and then performed additional work if warranted and if time allowed. By taking thoughtful, deliberate approach, team members eliminated a backlog of signal and lighting work.

Darin Fristrup, Region One Traffic Operations Engineer nominated the team. Fristrup points out those team members “spent over 766 hours on the lighting issues, replaced or repaired 256 luminaires and other lighting hardware, and pulled nearly 15,000 feet of copper wire.”

“They did all this while continuing to be on call to repair, replace, or maintain Region One’s 325 traffic signals, and provided numerous hours of assistance to local government agencies in the maintenance of their signals, as needed,” said Fristrup. “There is no group more dedicated to their responsibilities than the Region One Signals Maintenance Team, who is highly deserving of this award.”

Congratulations to team members: Dale Lake, Scott Harris, David Townsend, Jereme Fullmer

 

I-15 CORE FINAL STRETCH

This post is based on a press release written Leigh Dethman, I-CORE Public Relations Manager.

UDOT’s I-15 Corridor Expansion Project will be completed in December.

This new Diverging Diamond Interchange near 500 East in American Fork is one of 10 interchanges being rebuilt or replaced as part of the I-15 CORE project.

I-15 CORE, the largest highway project in Utah history, has entered the final year of construction and is on schedule for completion.

“We’re delivering a complete reconstruction of the freeway that will meet traffic demand through the year 2030, while at the same time we’re using innovation to minimize delays for the traveling public,” according to Todd Jensen, UDOT I-15 CORE project director. The project adds two additional lanes in each direction from Lehi to Spanish Fork, extends the HOV lane from University Parkway to Spanish Fork, rebuilds or replaces 63 bridges and 10 freeway interchanges and places new 40-year concrete pavement throughout the project.

“Construction crews are out working hard every day in order to wrap this project up in an unprecedented 35 months,” said Todd Jensen, UDOT I-15 CORE project director. “Although the end is in sight, there is still a lot of work left to do and we appreciate everyone’s patience.”

Plenty of work has been done already. As of Nov. 30, I-15 CORE crews had:

  • Excavated and placed 6.3 million tons of fill dirt — enough to fill 12 BYU Marriott Centers
  • Erected 420,000 square feet (or 31,000 linear feet) of sound wall — enough to build a wall around The Gateway, Energy Solutions Arena, the Salt Lake Convention Center, Temple Square and City Creek Center — or 11 whole Salt Lake City blocks
  • Poured 249 lane miles of concrete pavement — enough to construct a two-lane highway from Provo to Logan.
    Painted more than 6 million feet of temporary striping and roadway markings (roughly 1,100 miles) — enough to paint a line all the way from Provo to Houston
  • Installed 40 miles of drainage pipeline — more than 1.5 times the length of Utah Lake

Crews will be busy in the coming months. The section of I-15 CORE between Lehi and Lindon is scheduled for completion in early June. Interchanges at 1600 North, 800 North and Center Street in Orem are being reconstructed. A new I-15 overpass at 500 West in Provo is nearing completion. A Continuous Flow Intersection is being constructed at University Parkway and Sandhill Road in Orem and two pedestrian undercrossings are being completed near Utah Valley University.

Drivers can stay informed about I-15 CORE construction activities by signing up for weekly email updates, following the project on facebook.com/i15core and twitter.com/i15core and receiving text updates by texting “i15core” to 53535.

AASHTO APP

AASHTO's smart-phone app provides access to real-time traffic conditions and news

An AASHTO  smart-phone app that provides access to real-time traffic conditions and news is now available on Android operating systems.

AASHTO introduced a smart phone app for iPhone in July of 2011.  The popular app provides easy access to the daily Transportation Update and weekly AASHTO Journal. Both versions of the app were developed by iENGINEERING of Chantilly Virginia.

MOVING FORWARD

Ten stories from 2011:

UDOT’s biggest ever I-15 CORE project passed the halfway point in September. The project is on schedule to be completed by December of 2012. This photo shows construction of mechanically stabilized earth walls to support the a wider bridge at Orem Center Street.

1.  The Sam White Bridge was moved into place using Self Propelled Modular Transporters on March 26.  Part of UDOT’s I-15 Corridor Expansion Project, the football field long structure was built on the east of the freeway in a “bridge farm.”

2.  UDOT’s biggest ever I-15 CORE project passed the halfway to completion point in September. The project is on schedule to be completed by December of 2012. The corridor expansion adds 2 additional lanes in each direction from Lehi to Spanish Fork, extends the HOV lane from University Parkway to Spanish Fork, rebuilds or replaces 63 bridges and 10 freeway interchanges and places new 40-year concrete pavement throughout the project.

3.  Four statements that define UDOT’s responsibilities as custodian of the state transportation system were been re-tooled to meet the current technological, political and economic climate. The goals were introduced by Director John Njord at UDOT’s Annual Conference in November.

Preserve Infrastructure — Our primary goal is to take care of the transportation infrastructure. The most effective way to preserve the transportation system is to maintain a regular schedule of up-keep to prevent deterioration.

Optimize Mobility – UDOT will make improvements that reduce delay on freeways, at intersections and along major corridors and judiciously expand system capacity.

Improve Safety — Safety will always be a core responsibility, and includes improving safety on roads as well as work sites.

Strengthen the Economy — While prosperity is the role of the private sector, “government can however facilitate, enable and in some cases, stimulate and in the case of our business, we can actually strengthen economic prosperity,” said Njord.

4.  A major landslide that closed State Route 14 put a massive rebuilding effort in motion at UDOT. A team of UDOT engineers, along with local design and construction experts, is conducting preliminary investigations and use an innovative contracting method to accelerate the removal of the landslide material in a safe manner, re-establish the stream bed and construct a new road. UDOT has selected General Contractor Kiewit from proposals submitted by construction companies to bring private construction expertise to the design table.  Their services include determining risks and costs associated with this unique project as well as providing expedited construction solutions to the design team.

5.  The Mountain View Corridor project, a freeway, transit and trail system under construction in western Salt Lake County and northern Utah County earned the 2011 Excellence in Utility Relocation and Accommodation Award from FHWA. The construction area includes about 900 separate impacts to existing utility facilities and crosses 13 municipalities, difficult terrain and a 300-foot-wide power and gas corridor.

6.  UDOT completed Bangerter Highway 2.0 , an expansive mobility upgrade from the Salt Lake City Airport to 13400 South. The effort has reduced travel delay on Bangerter Highway by incorporating innovative intersections and improved pavement.

7.  The Black Ridge to Iron County project improved safety and traffic mobility on I-15 north of Cedar City. An extra lane was added to provide better mobility. Wildlife fencing was installed along both sides of I-15 from the lower part of the Black Ridge to the overpass west of Kanarraville, providing protection for over 12 miles of freeway. “This area has long been plagued with high numbers of collisions between vehicles and deer, particularly during the late fall to early spring period,” according to Randall Taylor, UDOT Resident Engineer.

8.  Utah’s first ThrU-Turn Intersection was built at 12300 South and State Street. UDOT has adapted a Michigan U-Turn, commonly built from scratch in the mid-west, in an innovative retrofit improvement to upgrade the safety and function of the busy intersection. The TTI provided significant relief from traffic delay on the first day of operation and well past 20 years, according to UDOT traffic studies. The budget for the project was relatively small at just under $5 million. During the first year of operation, road users will save almost $1 million–a lot of user-cost savings for the money spent.

9.  UDOT received a coveted national award for developing a cutting edge Geographic Information System based web application. uPlan, an online map that integrates data from many different sources, was recognized by Esri with a Special Achievement Award for as being in the top tier of web GIS applications in the United States. UDOT was one of only 100 to be recognized from a field of over 100,000 projects. “Getting this award indicates that UDOT is in-step with the world in employing the latest GIS technologies,” said John Thomas, Director of planning at UDOT.

10.  Visiweb is a new, easy to use web-based photo log that merges images and data to provide a better view of UDOT’s roads. Visiweb provides high resolution pictures of the road along with data such as  IRI,  GPS with elevation and cross-slope. The new view of state roads will help UDOT maintenance workers and engineers identify problem spots and plan for future improvements, all from the comfort of an office PC. While it has taken some time to develop, the new tool was worth the wait, says Russ Scovil, UDOT Pavement Condition Engineer. “It enhances what we had before,” says Scovil. The application allows users to configure the operation to meet their needs when it comes to accessing information about the road.