Category Archives: Optimize Mobility

OUT OF SIGHT

I-15 CORE project concrete drainage pipes were installed under the freeway without shutting down traffic lanes. 

Provo River Constructors installed drainage pipe using by using augers or a tunneling machine with a cutting head to excavate under the freeway while lanes stayed open.

Some of the ways UDOT keeps lanes open during construction are easy to see – for example lane shifts that allow work to occur safely next to traffic. And, UDOT is famous for moving already-built bridges into place. But some lane-saving construction takes place out of the public eye.

The I-15 CORE contractor, Provo River Constructors, used a method of installing drainage pipe that avoids open cuts that require lane closures. Called jacked pipe, the system uses augers or a tunnel boring machine with a cutting head to excavate under the freeway while simultaneously pushing pipe segments through to the other side. I-15 CORE recently won a Project Achievement Award from the Concrete Pipe Association for the jacked pipe installation.

Minger Construction of Chanhassen, Minnesota installed over two miles of pre-cast reinforced jacked pipe. The innovative construction methods used by the sub-contractor made for accurate and efficient installation.

Additionally, the project used long -rebar as reinforcement in small-gauge pipe, which is not common. “The rebar keeps the pipe straight,” according to Randy Whalen, Marketing Engineer of Oldcastle Precast, producer of the pipe. Keeping pipe “dimensionally accurate,” is more critical with smaller pipe since “pipe that is even one eight inch off can induce a curve.”

Given the maintenance of traffic constraints coupled with the aggressive schedule, the process of jacking pipe under the freeway was very important to the overall project. Provo River Constructors was required by UDOT to keep traffic lanes open during construction, explains Robert Stewart, I-15 CORE Deputy Project Director. “I don’t think you could have built this project without jacking and boring.”

For a more detailed description of jacked pipe construction methods, read an article posted by Concretepipe.org. Scroll down to the previous post to see a slide show of the work on the I-15 CORE project.

JACKING PIPE

These slides show pipe jacking operations on the I-15 CORE project.

Concrete drainage pipes were installed under the freeway using a augers or a tunnel boring machine to excavate. Pipes were then pushed through segment by segment to the other side.

To see photo descriptions, click the large image. To select images, place the cursor in the black portion at the bottom of the show.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

WALK MORE 2012

The “Walk More in Four” challenge offers the chance for schools to win $500,
and for students to win bikes and scooters.

The UDOT Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAP)™ is a fun and comprehensive program for walking and biking safely to school

Any parent who has a school aged child has probably observed traffic congestion around a school drop-off point.  Too many cars can increase the risk of fender-benders and make watching out for pedestrians and cyclists more difficult.

UDOT’s Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAP)™ “Walk More in Four” challenge is an annual month-long event designed to encourage more Utah K-8 students to walk or bike safely to school at least three days each week during the month of September. This is the fourth Walk More in Four event, and the messages of the campaign seem to be reaching Utah students according to Cherissa Wood, UDOT SNAP Coordinator.

A voluntary survey of participants indicates that most students rarely walked or biked to school during the previous year. “By encouraging students to walk or bike to school at least three times each week during September, SNAP positively changed the travel behaviors of Utah students and provided the means for develop a lasting, safe and healthy habit,” says Wood.

And, student participation in Walk More in Four is increasing. About 1000 participated statewide during the first two years. Last year, that number shot up to 4000. Wood expects that more students will chose to take part in the 2012 Walk More in Four promotion.

To participate, students should track their trips to school by using the Walk More in Four progress chart. Each student who turns in a completed chart by Wednesday, October 3 will be eligible for a chance to win prizes including helmets, bikes and scooters.

The school with the highest percentage of participating students will win $5oo for its safety committee, along with The Golden Tennis Shoe traveling trophy. To participate, schools must register by September 7 by visiting the  SNAP website.

SNAP is a fun and comprehensive program engages and educates students, parents, school administrators, crossing guards and communities. As part of the federal Safe Routes to School program administered by UDOT, SNAP focuses on student safety as its first priority.

More tips and resources are available to parents and school administrators on the SNAP website.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

BLOG SURVEY

The UDOT Blog is intended to inform a transportation audience.

The UDOT Blog debut was April 21, 2010, and since then, 371 articles have been posted. The topics range from safety to geo-tech, and the intended audience is UDOT employees, private sector partners and members of the general public.

The blog is designed to allow readers to share ideas and find out about programs, projects and practices at UDOT. The format is based in part on an initial survey of UDOT employees. A total of 803 employees answered the survey, and provided feedback that became guidance for the blog.

The UDOT Communications Office invites you to take another survey so the blog can be improved.

THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES

To all those who sent in photos for the Faces in Transportation – Thanks!

Faces in Transportation is an annual competition that solicits photos that show the people who build, maintain and use our nation’s transportation system. UDOT employees sent in many great photos and two were selected by Director John Njord and Deputy Director Carlos Braceras.

Prizes of the contest include awards that go to the entering agency: first Prize, $500; People’s Choice Prize, $500; Three Prizes in each of three categories, $125 each.

Voting for the People’s Choice award is open. Follow this link to see UDOT’s photos and vote!


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

2013 MAP

UDOT is collecting information for the 2013 Official Utah State Highway Map.

Lisa Holgreen, UDOT Communications Assistant sends out maps almost daily.

UDOT and the Utah Office of Tourism partner to produces the state’s Official State Highway Map, and the process to re-do the new map is underway. Updating the map takes into account input from UDOT employees, county road supervisors and state and federal agency representatives. Effort is underway now to contact people who may have suggestions for improving the new map.

While UDOT cartographers make the map’s features accurate, the Utah Office of Tourism makes it beautiful. Clarkson Creative, a local graphic arts company will design a layout for the new map that emphasizes Utah’s scenic attractions.

The map is used by citizens, visitors to the state and school children from across the nation who need information for school projects. Lisa Holgreen, UDOT Communications Assistant sends out maps almost daily. Every year, UDOT sends around six hundred maps to individuals and more to visitor centers across the state. If Holgreen gets a request from a visitor center, she can often send more than one thousand maps in a day. The Utah Office of Tourism also mails maps on request and distributes maps through visitor centers.

A digital version of the map is available online on UDOT’s website. To make suggestions for changes on the new map, email your comments to statemap@utah.gov.

IC DEMO

UDOT recently hosted an FHWA demonstration of Intelligent Compaction.

Intelligent Compaction uses GPS to determine the location and number of passes and sensors to determine the temperature and stiffness of asphalt pavement. The technology may eventually take the guess-work out of compacting pavement.

US 89 and SR 180 in UDOT Region Three is the first of nine projects locations from across the country to employ and evaluate Intelligent Compaction. The data collected and experience gained by studying IC will eventually determine if the sophisticated construction method effectively takes the guess-work out of compacting asphalt pavement.

IC systems are similar to regular asphalt pavement compactors but equipped with GPS to determine the location and number of passes and sensors to determine the temperature and stiffness of the pavement. As the compactor makes passes over the newly installed asphalt, stiffness measurements are integrated with the GPS information on a display that gives the operator a comprehensive near real-time picture of the compaction process.

The system creates an animated, color-coded online map so the compaction process can be monitored. The animation can also be played back for review.

Although the process measures pavement stiffness, the intent of the project is to correlate stiffness with pavement density, which is critical when it comes to longevity of the pavement, explains Lee Gallivan, Asphalt Pavement Engineer with FHWA. “Compaction is really the central part of the performance of the pavement.”

“You can have a real great mix design that meets all the Superpave requirements,” explains Gallivan, but with poor compaction, the pavement will not achieve appropriate density and meet the test of time. Conversely, a poor or mediocre mix design can be compacted well, and that pavement may last a long time.  Extending the life of pavement “is where the public gets its money’s worth.”

Over the next two years, FHWA will sponsor IC demonstration projects in diverse parts of the country. The IC measurements will be correlated to nuclear gauge or coring density tests. The data collected from the geographically disparate projects will provide information about different mix designs, environments, substrates and traffic levels. Eventually, IC could become an accepted method for quality-control and quality-assurance for contractors and departments of transportation.

GROUND PENETRATING RADAR

The Federal Highways Administration is sponsoring demonstrations of a new technology that uses radar to analyze pavement.

GPR technology uses radar to create a cross sectional analysis of the pavement.

The new technology can help determine the remaining service life of pavement without using invasive means. Testing is necessary to find out what conditions are causing pavement deterioration, and then to determine the right course of action to take to preserve or replace the pavement.

Typically, engineers determine the remaining service life pavement by drilling core samples. Coring pavement takes time and resources to extract , transport and then test the pavement. Coring is also an inconvenience for the traveling public since lane closures are required for the work to take place.

Ground Penetrating Radar can provide a close and detailed look at pavement without the time, expense lane closures required by coring.

GPR technology uses radar to create a cross sectional analysis of the pavement under the surface. The equipment is mounted on a regular vehicle that can move with traffic, so no lane closures are required. While coring gives snap-shot looks at pavement condition.

In one sweep, GPR can collect enough information to have a comprehensive view of the pavement, including density, material variation, degradation due to stripping or other factors, and thickness. The data collection method works on concrete or asphalt and is “a better way to diagnose the problem,” according to Tom Yu, Senior Pavement Design Engineer with FHWA.

Although GPR is a great diagnosis tool for pavements that need rehabilitation, Yu sees other opportunities as well. “For me, the most promising area is construction [quality and assurance] testing.” Yu visited UDOT Region Three recently with a GPR equipped van and spoke at an Intelligent Compaction Demonstration. He will take the van on the road to collect data so he can demonstrate the usefulness of the new technology. “It needs to show its own value” before the pavement data collection method is widely adopted.

GOING GREEN

A new tool will improve the way UDOT monitors and optimizes traffic signal performance.

UDOT is using a new online tool for automated traffic signal performance measures.

To keep traffic moving, traffic engineers aim to create signal timing plans that allow most cars to reach an intersection on a green light, according to UDOT Traffic Signal Operations Engineer Mark Taylor.

When cars reach the intersection on green, concerns such as waiting and frustration, traffic delay, pollution from idling and wear and tear on vehicles and pavement are all reduced. And the dilemma zone, the point at which drivers decide to stop or proceed through the signal, is also reduced, which improves the safety at intersections.

But establishing and maintaining efficient signal plans typically costs thousands of dollars to develop. Engineers use resources, including equipment or people to monitor signal operations, collect traffic volume counts and then model and create a signal plan, explains Taylor. Since collection and modeling methods are time and resource intensive, updating the signal plan is usually only done every few years.

Plus, typical modeling and collection methods only providing a limited, snap-shot view that degrades over time as traffic patterns change. To really improve signal operation, “we need to know in real time where the problems are so we can make corrections to operations to improve traffic flow,” says Taylor.

UDOT is using a new online tool, called Signal Performance Metrics, originally developed by Indiana Department of Transportation and Purdue University. The system uses Dilemma Zone radar detection already in place along with reconfigured software provided at no charge to UDOT by developers at Wavetronics and Econolite.

The system locates and counts cars, places a time stamp on every car and then pulls that data into online graphs that can be observed in real time. “We’ve got over 500 sites where we already have Dilemma Zone detectors installed at intersections,” says Taylor.

Signal Performance Metrics has a potential benefit for signal operation everywhere but especially on weekends when signals operate with plans designed for week day off-peak hours. Taylor says the system “will help us be much more proactive with traffic signal timing seven days, twenty four hours a day.”

UDOT Director John Njord has charged traffic engineers with creating a world-class traffic signal system and employing Signal Performance Metrics is a step in that direction. Taylor is pleased about the ability to see in real time whether existing signal plans are good or bad so signal timing can be changed as needed, without using limited funding to monitor corridors or intersections. He thinks the traveling public will eventually see better traffic progression and less delay. “This is big for us.”

RESEARCH PROJECTS SELECTED

Projects have been selected for funding from the 2012 UDOT Research Workshop held on May 10.

The Maintenance Group discusses development of a weather severity index during the 2012 Research Workshop.

Fifty-two projects were submitted this year to the UDOT Research Workshop. Of these, nine projects will be funded through the Research Division, one of which was combined from two submitted problem statements. Several other projects of those submitted will be funded directly by other divisions. Several other projects of those submitted may also be funded directly by other divisions.

The workshop serves as one step in the research project selection process which involves UDOT, FHWA, universities, private sector firms and other transportation agencies. UDOT Research Division solicited problem statements for six focus areas: Structures and Geo-technical, Environmental and Hydraulics, Construction and Materials, Maintenance, Traffic Management and Safety and Pre-construction.

At the workshop, transportation professionals met to prioritize problem statements in order to select the ones most suitable to become research projects. Three voting criteria were used: importance of research, relevance to UDOT, and likelihood of implementation. All UDOT staff voted during the prioritization process. After the workshop, UDOT Research Division staff reviewed prioritization and funding for each recommended problem statement with division and group leaders.

The selected projects include:

  • Development of a Utah Winter Severity Index
  • Additional research into sampling and testing protocols for cold in-place recycling of asphalt pavements
  • Development of mobile applications for use by UDOT Maintenance
  • Additional funding toward a multi-state pooled fund project to investigate lateral pile resistance near MSE walls
  • Additional funding toward a multi-state pooled fund to research passive force-displacement for skewed bridge abutments
  • Research into environmentally friendly and sustainable stream stability treatments in the vicinity of bridges
  • Evaluation of effective construction risk management through CMGC contracting

Projects presented at the Research Workshop to be funded by other divisions include:

  • The Aurora Project working to advance road weather information systems technology
  • Improving wet night visibility of pavement markings
  • Development of a culvert management plan
  • Implementing safety analysis tools in planning, programming, design and operations

Other projects are being considered and may yet be added.

A significant factor for success was the broad project support from various UDOT Divisions and university representatives. We were excited that a number of pro-jects may receive funding from other sources. Many UDOT divisions including Maintenance, Planning, Traffic and Safety and the TOC are considering contributing funding along with University Transportation Centers.

By: Kevin Nichol, P.E.
UDOT Research Division
Catherine Higgins
UDOT Communication Department