Monthly Archives: January 2013

TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT DIVISION AND REGION 2 ASSIST WITH GOVERNOR’S INAUGURATION

An inauguration of an elected official is an exciting event, and UDOT was on hand during the January 7, 2013 inauguration of Governor Herbert to ensure that traffic moved smoothly. UDOT was contacted by Capitol staff ahead of the inauguration hoping to mitigate traffic problems that were observed during previous inauguration events. The UDOT Traffic Management Division (TMD) and UDOT Region 2 were tasked with using the knowledge and tools available to ensure that traffic delays were at a minimum during this important event.IMT Truck & Utah State Capitol

“The staff at the UDOT TMD and Region 2 went above and beyond to help get attendees of Governor Herbert’s inauguration where they needed to go safely and with little confusion or traffic delay,” said Eric Rasband, UDOT Engineer-in-charge for the event.

UDOT’s duties were to coordinate signal timing plans, attend pre- and post-event meetings, coordinate with Capitol employees and local police as well as handle traffic control and snow/ice removal. UDOT also utilized its social media outlets for parking alerts and related information.

The total attendance for the event was between 1000 and 1500. Overall, traffic moved very well and there were no major delays.

FIVE WAYS TO SAVE LIVES ON UTAH’S ROADS

In 2012, 215 lives were lost on Utah’s roads in car crashes—the lowest Utah traffic fatalities have been since 1959. We are making progress toward our goal of Zero Fatalities, but we still have a ways to go. These 215 fatalities were preventable and we hope we can continue to see this number decline, ultimately to zero.

Fatality Numbers

Here are five simple ways to save lives—including your own—on Utah’s roads.

  1. Always, always buckle up. Wearing your seat belt is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a crash. In 2012, buckling up could have saved 67 lives on Utah’s roads. Buckling up takes two seconds to do, and could mean the difference between life or death in a crash. Commit now to always wear your seat belt, and let your passengers know that your car won’t move until everyone is buckled up.
  2. If you’ve been drinking, don’t drive. Designate a driver, call a cab or take public transit. There is no excuse for driving under the influence. Sadly, 41 people died in Utah due to impaired driving in 2012. Alcohol and illegal drugs aren’t the only things that can impair your driving. Prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and lack of sleep can also impair your ability to drive safely.
  3. Too tired? Don’t drive. Believe it or not, drowsy driving kills. Fourteen fatalities in 2012 are attributed to drowsy driving. If you’re feeling drowsy, pull over and switch drivers, find a safe place to sleep for the night or get out of the car and stretch or jog for a few minutes. Drowsy driving is just as dangerous as drunk driving.
  4. Stay focused on the road. With so many potential distractions, a driver’s attention may easily get diverted if the driver isn’t making a conscious effort to stay focused on the road. It takes just one time of looking away for a brief moment—reading a text, changing the radio or even answering the phone—to cause a disaster. Twenty people died in 2012 in distracted driving-related crashes.
  5. Slow down and don’t drive aggressively. Whether you have a “need for speed” or you’re running a few minutes late, pushing that accelerator a little harder could cost you your life—it cost 43 people theirs in 2012. A total of 49 people died on Utah’s roads in 2012 due to aggressive driving or speeding. Aggressive driving means operating a vehicle in a way that endangers or is likely to endanger people or property.

2012 Zero Fatalities Infographic

Join us as we continue the conversation about Zero Fatalities, what you can do and how we’re doing toward our goal in 2013 by following us on Twitter and liking us on Facebook. You can also review the full 2012 Fatalities Data Analysis report by visiting the Zero Fatalities website.

This post was written by Jane Putnam, Zero Fatalities Team.