Monthly Archives: November 2012


Each Friday, a photo that emphasizes one or more of the Final Four Strategic goals will be featured on the UDOT Blog.

UDOT, in partnership with the Utah Department of Public Safety, met with media to help spread the word that moving is safer than waiting for troopers on the side of the freeway.

The Final Four helps UDOT focus on improving the transportation system and include:

  1. Preserve Infrastructure — The most effective way to preserve the transportation system is to maintain a regular schedule of up-keep to prevent deterioration.
  2. Optimize Mobility — Making improvements that reduce delay on freeways, at intersections and along major corridors and judiciously expanding system capacity keeps traffic moving, The former goals, Increasing Capacity and Make the System Work will be combined into a new goal, Optimize Mobility, which will incorporate .
  3. ZERO Fatalities — Even one death on Utah roads is too many. UDOT strives to reach ZERO Fatalities, a goal we can all live with.
  4. Strengthen the EconomyAn efficient, well maintained transportation system is fundamental to a strong economy.

Some of the photos will be part of a set of images that can be viewed on UDOT’s Flickr photostream in a set with captions that gives information about transportation activities. This Friday Photo shows an image from a media event aimed at telling the public what actions to take after a minor crash. View other photos from this event on Flickr.

UDOT employees, private sector partners or members of the the general public are encouraged to send in photos to be considered for Friday Photo. Send photos along with a caption to Catherine Higgins.


Moving away from traffic lanes after a fender-bender is safer than staying put.


Incident Management Trucks have been employed by UDOT for years to help clear crashes quickly. Now, some of those trucks will have special equipment to move disabled cars.

Drivers who stay with their car are creating a risky environment for themselves, for state troopers who respond to the scene and for other motorists. A crash scene creates a distraction that prompts other drivers slow to take a look or change lanes abruptly. That unpredictable driver behavior cause a traffic flow environment where secondary crashes can occur more easily.

“When people get into a minor crash, they need to call 911 and go to the nearest exit,” says UDOT spokesperson Tania Mashburn. “But moving after a crash is not something drivers may be used to doing.”

UDOT, in partnership with the Utah Department of Public Safety, will met with media to help spread the word that moving is safer than waiting for troopers on the side of the freeway. And, UDOT will be on hand to help motorists as well.

Incident Management Trucks have been employed for years to help clear crashes quickly. Now, some of those trucks will have special equipment to move cars.

The new equipment is installed under the truck so there’s no trailer to make maneuvering through traffic complicated. The equipment deploys quickly and easily so IMT workers can get disabled cars to the nearest ramp or the safest place to wait for help.

UDOT is committed to safety first in the case of a crash. The new equipment on Incident Management Trucks will help motorists involved in fender-benders move off the freeway and preserve the safety of troopers and the traveling public.


The Federal Highways Association has launched new initiatives aimed at making every construction day count.

Utah’s FHWA Administrator James Christian gave an overview of EDC2, an effort to assist states with adopting proven ways to improve the safety, operation and longevity of transportation systems, at the recent UDOT Conference.

EDC2 will promote 13 innovations to transportation agencies and construction and design industries for the next two years. Specialists from FHWA will be deployed to explain and implement the benefits each of the innovations has to stakeholders across the country.  UDOT has already participated in some of the innovations, and is a leader in some as well.

High Friction Surfaces use an epoxy binder and a non-polishing aggregate to improve skid-resistance. Several states have used HFS and realized an immediate reduction in crashes.

One innovation, Intelligent Compaction, was demonstrated in Utah recently.  IC systems are similar to regular asphalt pavement compactors but equipped with GPS.  As the compactor makes passes over the newly installed asphalt, stiffness measurements are integrated with the GPS information on a display that gives the operator a comprehensive near real-time picture of the compaction process.

The system creates an animated, color-coded online map so the compaction process can be monitored. Although the process measures pavement stiffness, the intent of the project is to correlate stiffness with pavement density using traditional coring testing methods. Density is critical when it comes to longevity of the pavement.

FHWA is reaching out to UDOT and other states to promote another EDC2 innovation, High Friction Surfaces. HFS, usually consisting of an epoxy binder and a non-polishing aggregate, improves roadway skid-resistance in places where motorists need help to brake more effectively. UDOT has applied HFS in two locations in Utah, one in Payson and one in Logan Canyon.

Several states have used HFS and realized an immediate reduction in crashes. Before and after studies that look at crash data, skid resistance, and other factors, will provide the basis for an objective assessment in Utah. UDOT will also monitor how the HFS tolerates weather extremes, traffic and snow plows.

UDOT is an internationally known leader in Accelerated Bridge Technology, one of the EDC2 innovations. Design Build and Construction Manager/General Contractor, contracting methods included in the EDC2 list have been used by UDOT to build high quality projects more quicly and efficiently.

To see a list of all 13 innovations and read more about each, visit the EDC2 website.


Commuters driving between Utah and Salt Lake County will likely experience less delay starting Monday, November 5.

New Diverging Diamond Interchange

That’s when UDOT’s I-15 CORE will open all travel lanes through the 24-mile project. Construction will continue until mid December, but the open lanes will provide better mobility through the corridor while workers complete landscaping, drainage, barrier construction, painting and other activities during off-peak times.

I-15 CORE is the fastest billion-dollar public highway project ever constructed in the U.S. – an impressive fete considering the project scope. From Lehi Main Street to the Spanish Fork River, crews have added two travel lanes in each direction, placed new concrete pavement, and rebuilt or replaced 63 bridges and 10 freeway interchanges in an unprecedented 35 months.

Contractor Provo River Constructors deserve credit for proceeding construction quickly. “They set an aggressive schedule and were prepared to meet it,” says John Butterfield, UDOT Materials and Pavement Engineer for the project. While good weather provided a backdrop, PRC was able to provide the resources and people necessary to move work forward.

Much of the work has been done out of the way of traffic. For example, some of the bridges were built off-site then moved into place. Crews also pushed miles of concrete pipe under the freeway rather than installing drainage systems using open-trench methods which require closures.

When the project was initiated, UDOT hoped for 14 to 15 miles of new freeway with the available budget. However the project exceeds what was originally expected. The new wider freeway, 40- year pavement and 75-year bridges represent long term value to Utah taxpayers.