Monthly Archives: September 2012


Change at Central Maintenance is aimed at giving the four UDOT Regions an expanded role in setting the direction of maintenance functions.

Regional maintenance station personnel do the work to preserve the transportation system. Here, workers repair a longitudinal crack in asphalt pavement. Many maintenance workers have decades of accrued knowledge about area roads, structures, and even typical weather patterns.

Soon after taking charge in early 2012, Central Maintenance Director Kevin Griffin named two Deputies.  Method Engineers Tim Ularich and Shana Lindsey have been given the responsibility to spend more time working closely with the regions. Region personnel are the ones directly responsible for maintaining the state transportation system.

Ularich and Lindsay are part of a cultural shift at Central Maintenance that will let regions take a larger role in developing innovations, setting performance standards, and deciding on budget distributions.

Giving the regions more say makes sense – after all, regional maintenance station personnel work to preserve the transportation system and perform core functions like snow and ice removal.  Many maintenance workers have decades of accrued knowledge about area roads, structures, and even typical weather patterns.

Tim Ularich, Ken Berg, Jessica Andrews, Shana Lindsey, Lynn Bernhard, Lloyd Neeley.

That institutional expertise can be valuable if tapped. Each year, Central Maintenance conducts method studies that investigate new or better technologies. Those studies have typically been developed at the central level. Ularich says he and Lindsey will spend face time getting the region’s take on what is needed. “Then, we’ll bring it back and implement the studies.”

The role of the two deputies will not be limited to the method study process. Lindsey says she and Ularich are on hand for anything, including obtaining standards and specifications, putting contracts in place and procuring materials – “we are coordinating that help.” Both deputies know the UDOT organization and can provide adept support. Central’s role will be to insure consistency across the state, she explains.

Regions will also play a larger part in determining performance standards. And that new role will come with commensurate responsibility; each region will be accountable for the performance of its maintenance crews.

Along with organizational and process changes, two web-based tools are being developed to help the regions. A Performance Dashboard will show performance measures in real time and a procurement system will help maintenance crews acquire necessities, like plow blades and sand, more easily.

The new direction at Central Maintenance will help the regions “achieve the departments goals” with the help and guidance of Central Maintenance says Griffin. “We’re not going to tell them how to do their work; we’re here to work with the regions to set performance standards and to support them.”


UDOT’s Communication Office uses Flickr to share photos of the state transportation system. 

Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

Flickr is an easy to use photo platform that provides a way to share visual essays of how UDOT improves the state transportation system.  UDOT’s Flickr photostream contains images of media events, conferences, construction and maintenance projects and equipment.

One great feature of Flickr is that photos can be arranged in ordered sets with captions. Those sets can explain a process or show progress on a construction project. For example, this set contains images of the Telegraph Street Bridge replacement in St. George.

Flickr also integrates well with other forms of social media. Slide shows on the UDOT Blog are Flickr sets. Links to photos or photo sets are easy to share by email.

The UDOT Communications Office would like to expand the use of Flickr to include a wider range of photos from across the state so a variety of UDOT activities can be shared among employees, private sector partners, media and the general public.

Send in your photos

Here are some general guidelines for sending in photos:

  • Make sure the images are high quality JPEG images that are 1200 x 800 pixels.
  • For subject ideas, choose subject matter that shows UDOT’s four areas of focus: Improve Safety, Optimize Mobility, Preserve Infrastructure and Strengthen the Economy.
  • Show candid shots of events or work processes. Real life scenes are the most interesting.
  • Take photos from different perspectives to get a good overall view of an event or construction or maintenance project.
  • Send in photos taken recently.
  • Send in a series of photos or a single photo.
  • Anyone can send in photos as long as the subject relates to UDOT.
  • Photos will be used on Flickr at the discretion of the UDOT Communications Office.

Photos can be sent by email or delivered on a disk or other storage device to the Communications Office at the Calvin Rampton Complex. Please include photo descriptions and your contact information.


I-15 CORE project concrete drainage pipes were installed under the freeway without shutting down traffic lanes. 

Provo River Constructors installed drainage pipe using by using augers or a tunneling machine with a cutting head to excavate under the freeway while lanes stayed open.

Some of the ways UDOT keeps lanes open during construction are easy to see – for example lane shifts that allow work to occur safely next to traffic. And, UDOT is famous for moving already-built bridges into place. But some lane-saving construction takes place out of the public eye.

The I-15 CORE contractor, Provo River Constructors, used a method of installing drainage pipe that avoids open cuts that require lane closures. Called jacked pipe, the system uses augers or a tunnel boring machine with a cutting head to excavate under the freeway while simultaneously pushing pipe segments through to the other side. I-15 CORE recently won a Project Achievement Award from the Concrete Pipe Association for the jacked pipe installation.

Minger Construction of Chanhassen, Minnesota installed over two miles of pre-cast reinforced jacked pipe. The innovative construction methods used by the sub-contractor made for accurate and efficient installation.

Additionally, the project used long -rebar as reinforcement in small-gauge pipe, which is not common. “The rebar keeps the pipe straight,” according to Randy Whalen, Marketing Engineer of Oldcastle Precast, producer of the pipe. Keeping pipe “dimensionally accurate,” is more critical with smaller pipe since “pipe that is even one eight inch off can induce a curve.”

Given the maintenance of traffic constraints coupled with the aggressive schedule, the process of jacking pipe under the freeway was very important to the overall project. Provo River Constructors was required by UDOT to keep traffic lanes open during construction, explains Robert Stewart, I-15 CORE Deputy Project Director. “I don’t think you could have built this project without jacking and boring.”

For a more detailed description of jacked pipe construction methods, read an article posted by Scroll down to the previous post to see a slide show of the work on the I-15 CORE project.


These slides show pipe jacking operations on the I-15 CORE project.

Concrete drainage pipes were installed under the freeway using a augers or a tunnel boring machine to excavate. Pipes were then pushed through segment by segment to the other side.

To see photo descriptions, click the large image. To select images, place the cursor in the black portion at the bottom of the show.

Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.