June 12th, 2012

LONG JOINTS

Preserve Infrastructure, by Catherine Higgins.

The Federal Highways Association and the Asphalt Pavement association are working together to identify ways to prevent longitudinal joint failure.

A longitudinal joint in asphalt pavement is formed between two adjacent passes during installation. Joints that are not dealt with properly are subject to failure – visually, the pavement seems to unravel as weather and wear take a toll on the joint itself and sometimes the pavement section as a whole.

In a presentation given at the Asphalt Pavement Association, Howard Anderson characterized joints as a key part of the overall health of the pavement. When all other pavement characteristics are good, “you can still have failure with the pavement if the joint is poor.” The slide show below is a short version of Anderson’s presentation.

A good joint requires getting paving operations started off right. Some key considerations include having a balanced paving operation when it comes to plant production, the number of trucks, taking into account the travel time to and from the plant and paver speed coordinated to match the tonnage arriving on the project. Trucks should be loaded so the asphalt is not segregated by age.

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