Monthly Archives: April 2012

ROAD RESPECT 2012

Cyclists and motorists will tour the state to spread good will, safety education and family fun.

Mike Loveland, pictured second from the left, is an avid cyclist and a lieutenant with the Utah Highway Patrol. He sees the Road Respect campaign as a way to promote a cooperation and consideration between cyclists and motorists.

For the second year, avid cyclists with the Road Respect Tour will travel through the state and stop for rallies that celebrate respect between cyclists and motorists.  “Road Respect, Cars & Bikes Rules to Live By” is a grassroots campaign that seeks to encourage safe practices and good relationships between motorists and cyclists. The centerpiece of the campaign is a six day 509 mile ride through the state that will take place June 4-9.

Mike Loveland

Thirty cyclists representing law enforcement, public safety, transportation and bicycle advocacy will stop along the tour route to join community rallies meant to educate the public about rules for sharing the road. Local cyclists are encouraged to join the cyclists on their route and ride with them into the rallies.

Activities at the rallies will include bike rodeos, helmet give-aways, street and trail rides and speakers. Some of the rallies will include mini car shows. Participants will be encouraged to sign a pledge to signify compliance with obeying rules of the road.

Mike Loveland is an avid cyclist and a lieutenant with the Utah Highway Patrol. He participated as a cyclist last year and is helping to plan this year’s tour. Because of his job and his pastime, Loveland sees both sides of the issue.

The Road Respect campaign and tour is a way to encourage a “get-along attitude” between cyclists and motorists, he explains. Cooperation and consideration is necessary since both groups, according to Loveland “own a piece of the road.”

For more, read an article in Cycling Utah Magazine.

NEW ENGINEERS

UDOT Engineers In Training are finding their work at UDOT challenging and rewarding.

Greg Merrill is an Engineer in Training in UDOT's Rotational Engineer Program

Short bios on the newest engineers at the agency describe some of the experiences and knowledge that are being gained by UDOT Rotational Engineers and Interns as they work to design, build and take care of the transportation system. The bios are a way to introduce the Engineers in Training to others at UDOT and associated private sector firms.

UDOT’s Rotational Program gives engineers a chance to “understand the overall role of the department,” says Richard Murdock, who has managed the program for 7 years. The program has existed for more than 20 years in a similar organizational form. UDOT gains by welcoming in enthusiastic, newly graduated engineers who view the world of transportation with new eyes. The Rotational Engineers come from diverse backgrounds and varied experiences.

Engineers apply to the program right out of college. Once at UDOT, EITs work under the supervision of Professional Engineers and rotate from one UDOT department to another about every six months. UDOT has a reputation for providing a good EIT experience, so more candidates apply that the program can accommodate. UDOT also offers a number of year-round internships that include full state benefits.

The EITs like the opportunity to work in the different specialty areas and gain broad experience. The rotations allow new engineers “to see how each [department] works and functions and how they each tie together,” says Greg Merrill who is assigned to Region One Construction. Rotations provide “a chance to find your niche” in preparation for later specialization.

Mandatory rotations include construction, design, maintenance and traffic and safety. Many of the EITs mention design as being particularly challenging. “I had no idea what went into a project from either the design or construction side, so I had to ask a lot of questions and do a lot of research,” writes Megan Leonard, “ Being able to actually design projects is an amazing process and learning how many little details go into each project was an eye opener.”

Many of the Rotational Engineers appreciate the chance to network and learn from others at UDOT. “I have had great supervisors that have provided plenty of guidance whenever I have needed assistance understanding a concept or completing a project,” writes Aaron Pinkerton.

Leonard appreciates the respect she is shown at work. “I recommend this program to everyone who can apply for it. I feel like I’m trusted and treated like an actual staff member and not just a glorified intern.”

Read the bios:

Brian Allen

Zack Andrus

Jeremy Bown

Eric Buell

Scott Esplin

Ryan Ferrin

Alex Fisher

Megan Leonard

Greg Merrill

Ryan Nuesmeyer

Phillip Peterson

Aaron Pinkerton

Kayde Roberts

Brandon Weight

KWKW

Know Where Know Why is a communication effort that’s aimed at helping motorists avoid construction-related delay.

The KWKW website shows pop-up descriptions of projects that may cause delay to the traveling public.

A printed guide, interactive website, radio and TV spots and now, a traffic app – all are components of “the overall communication campaign for construction information for the general public,” according to UDOT Public Information Officer Nate McDonald.

Twenty high-impact projects are featured in UDOT’s new Know Where, Know Why 2012 Road Construction Guide. New this year, the guide has been distributed to auto repair and oil change shops along the I-15 corridor. UDOT is hoping that motorists who are preparing for a road trip will notice and pick up the guide. Guides have also shipped out to hotels, motels and truck stops across the state.

KWKW also includes television and radio spots that highlight the highest impact projects for weekend travelers.

UDOT Traffic is a new smart phone app available at the iTunes Store and Android Market and includes:
• A Google Maps display
• Traffic conditions
• Crashes, construction and hazards
• Special events
• Road weather and forecasts
• Seasonal road closures
• Traffic camera images
• Roadway sign messages

MORE GREEN

UDOT’s Continuous Flow Intersections have been used to enhance east-west traffic mobility in Salt Lake County.

CFI’s provide more green-light time by eliminating potential points of conflict. Watch this new video to see how the innovative configuration can increase the number of cars moving through an intersection by up to 70 percent.

NJORD ON RESEARCH

The role of transportation researchers is to be continually “scouring the river looking for those valuable gems of truth that will enable us to be even better.”

“Our business is dynamic and it’s changing all the time,” according to UDOT Director John Njord. In the constantly shifting world of transportation, it’s important for leaders to understand the leading edge. To set the stage for progress, Njord prefers taking a step forward to the “bleeding edge.” In a recent interview Njord explained the bleeding edge, how UDOT has benefited from research and what the future holds for transportation.

Conservatism dominates the world of civil engineering; transportation delivery has not changed radically over the last fifty years. Leading safely will produce a good transportation system, but “the bleeding edge is where you’re cutting new territory,” explained Njord. He believes that leaders need to be willing to say “ok, nobody has done this, we don’t know if it will be successful, but we’re going to try it anyway.”

To reach the bleeding edge, executives need to create an environment where failure is not punished. Njord hopes researchers and others at UDOT feel comfortable enough to “step out on the edge” while weighing risks against benefits and doing as much as possible to ensure success.

Recent success

Research has helped UDOT’s efforts to improve system mobility and reduce construction related delay. When many intersections along the Bangerter Highway in Salt Lake County were facing operational challenges, UDOT engineers “launched out to Juarez, Mexico” to investigate Continuous Flow Intersections. UDOT has since built many CFIs. With design changes that make operation better suited to Utah locations “they are tremendously efficient,” explains Njord.

The Sam White Bridge replacement was the longest bridge to be moved into place in the Western Hemisphere. UDOT has rolled more new bridges into place than all other states combined.

Bridge moves allow road users to collectively realize savings in the millions of dollars by avoiding construction related delay. Nearly a decade ago, Njord and others from UDOT traveled to Florida to learn about accelerated bridge construction.

Today, UDOT has rolled more new bridges into place than all other states combined, he explains. “The time savings we’ve been able to generate for people who travel on the highways is worth finding new ways to work; we’re on that bleeding edge,” said Njord.

Great expectations

Njord looks forward to seeing new research generate products that will make the transportation system safer and more reliable. SHRP 2, a Transportation Research Board effort, is focusing on developing ways to improve safety at intersections, rehabilitate highways and bridges without disrupting traffic, minimize unpredictable traffic congestion and expand highway capacity while also considering the natural and built environments.

As chair of the USDOT Executive Committee for the Connected Vehicle Program, Njord sees a day when “your children and grand children will be able to purchase a car that will never crash.” Connected vehicle technology will make use of smart roads integrated with other systems to anticipate and eliminate collisions. “That’s pretty awesome, said Njord. “ We don’t see the whole picture today but we will.”

GO GREEN, WEAR ORANGE.

Utah residents are invited to participate in UDOT’s first annual Adopt-a-Highway Earth Day clean-up.

UDOT's Adopt a Highway program will clean-up for Earth Day

Hundreds of groups in the state have committed to doing regular clean up along state routes. UDOT would like to welcome those groups and others to celebrate Earth Day a day early by participating in the first annual Adopt-a-Highway Earth Day event on Saturday, April 21 starting at 9 a.m.

Registered groups who want to participate should meet at the UDOT Maintenance Station nearest their assigned state route. All other groups or individuals who want to participate should contact the nearest Adopt-a-Highway coordinator by phone or email so UDOT can be provide orange bags and safety gear for the event.

Some areas in east Salt Lake or Summit County may still be too snowy for a clean-up. Groups that still want to participate should call and make arrangements to meet at another area nearby.

Adopt a Highway groups across the state of Utah have elected to celebrate Earth Day on Saturday April 21. UDOT Adopt-a-Highway coordinator Ashlee Parrish is promoting the statewide event as a way to help improve the community, the environment, and the aesthetics of state highways and “welcome this warm weather with a little spring cleaning!”