March 27th, 2012

EARTHQUAKE DRILL

Preserve Infrastructure, by Catherine Higgins.

UDOT will participate in an earthquake preparedness drill and an extended exercise that will simulate what could happen to the transportation system during a real earthquake.

“We are one of the critical infrastructure owners,” says Chris Siavrakas, Emergency Management Coordinator at UDOT. Transportation, along with other critical systems, including energy, water and health care, is part of an interdependent system, and the aftermath of an earthquake, UDOT employees will be responsible to make sure the transportation system is safe.

UDOT bridges are designed and constructed to AASHTO national design standards which account for hazard events such as earthquakes.  Many of the bridges on I-15 through the Wasatch Front have been rebuilt in the last 15 years. While UDOT does not anticipate extensive damage to the transportation system, some damage will occur. And, uncertainty exists when it comes to events, such as crashes or power outages and how those events will affect the transportation system.

During the Shake Out, a SimCell participants will call UDOT and other agencies and report realistic incidents.

To test readiness for dealing with such events, UDOT will participate in a scripted simulation. The calls will be generated by a “SimCell,” a group of Shake Out participants based at a state government building who will call UDOT and other agencies and report realistic incidents. An Emergency Operations Center set up for the Shake Out at UDOT’s Traffic Operations Center will take calls all day.

After an actual earthquake, calls will be coming in from a variety of sources – motorists, UDOT Maintenance employees, other agencies or businesses – and having a test that simulates that process will be useful. During the exercise, EOC participants will collect and evaluate data and “roll it into a report,” says Siavrakas.

UDOT will partner with the United States Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program to obtain realistic data. The USGS has software called ShakeCast that is available for use by critical infrastructure owners. The software can generate estimated damage data for structures like buildings and bridges. In an actual seismic event, ShakeCast can be used to send notification “within minutes of an earthquake indicating the level of shaking and the likelihood of impact” to facilities chosen by the user according to the USGS website.

The exercise will help the EOC “test our procedure of collecting artificial but plausible bridge damage data,” says Siavrakas.

Back Top

Responses to “EARTHQUAKE DRILL”

  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Back Top