October 13th, 2011

TWEETING ABOUT TRAFFIC

Optimize Mobility, by Guest Post.

How UDOT Uses Social Media, a guest post by Andrew Johnson, former UDOT employee.

Chances are you’ve been caught in a traffic jam, wishing you knew about it ahead of time. The Utah Department of Transportation is consistently making strides to keep Utah drivers informed before they get behind the wheel, and a large part of UDOT’s efforts is through the use of social media. (NEVER Tweet and drive!)

UDOT’s innovative approach to keeping commuters up to speed includes regular updates through their Twitter feed. This gives drivers access to real-time information about road closures, accidents, construction projects and abnormal delays, and also provides the public with direct access to UDOT employees.

Here’s an example of a recent conversation on Twitter:

Tweets keep motorists informed — CLICK TO ENLARGE.

In this example, someone Tweeted UDOT with information about a possible malfunctioning traffic signal. UDOT responded to the Tweet, and included the signal technicians at the Traffic Operations Center to relay that information. At that point, the technicians dialed into the signal, and were able to diagnose a potential problem. Since Twitter is a public forum, and anyone who is following @UtahDOT can see the conversation, other people may join the dialog and contribute information. I noticed the Tweets, and was able to contribute my two cents.

UDOT Traffic is another fantastic resource available with the click of a mouse or the swipe of your smart phone. UDOT Traffic includes a network of closed-circuit television cameras, electronic variable message signs, coordinated traffic signals, traffic sensors, ramp meters and weather stations. Together, this network delivers real-time information directly to employees at the Traffic Operations Center and to the UDOT Traffic website. Employees can take the information received at the TOC, relay that information on Twitter and Facebook, and thousands of people instantly receive that information and can plan their routes accordingly.

Travel times help road users to decide to continue as planned or to take an alternate route.

As you travel along Utah’s freeways, you may notice large black signs spanning across the lanes overhead. These are called Variable Message Signs, or VMS, and are extremely effective in communicating important information to public. Located at key points across the state, these signs are controlled by operators at the UDOT Traffic Operations Center, and can be activated with custom messages as needed. The messages on these signs are governed by UDOT policies, and format, length and wording is dictated by the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) by the Federal Highway Administration.

These signs provide drivers with clear, concise messages about freeway conditions, and drivers can then decide if they want to continue on the same route or choose an alternate route. VMS boards can also be coordinated with other State agencies like the Department of Public Safety to run messages about safety belt laws, and other public safety campaigns. You may also see messages about air quality alerts through the Utah Department of Environmental Quality.

Despite the integration of social media into their arsenal, not all of UDOT’s efforts into reducing delays for drivers are strictly reactionary. In fact, a large number of construction projects around the State are a response to future demands, and UDOT wants to make sure Utah’s transportation network is efficient for years to come.

Information and pictures provided by 24saltlake.com.

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Responses to “TWEETING ABOUT TRAFFIC”

  1. This is one of the most forward thinking ideas I’ve seen from a DOT. Nicely done.

  2. All praise for the great idea and applying new information technologies to improve traffic safety.

  3. Thanks for the comments! I agree that UDOT is very forward-thinking, and social media is a great way to harness the power of technology.

    Andrew Johnson at October 27, 2011 2:13 am
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