December 7th, 2010

TAG, YOU’RE NOT HIT

Uncategorized, by Catherine Higgins.

Some cattle in southern Utah’s open range area are sporting an accessory that helps motorists avoid cow vs. car crashes — reflective ear tags.

Reflective tags help motorists see cattle

Motorists who drive through open range area often need to slow or stop for cattle crossing the road. In the daytime, the big bovines are easy to spot. At night, it’s more likely that a Lexus will hit a longhorn.

Three Station Supervisors in UDOT Region Four have taken initiative to reduce cow hits by giving cowboys scrapped or expired reflective material to attach to ear tags on cattle. This high praise came from Utah Highway Patrol Officer Rick Eldredge, in an email thanking the three supervisors:

“Over the last couple of years our cow versus car accidents have been greatly reduced on our ‘Open Range Highways’ in San Juan County. I want to tell you how thankful myself and the citizens that travel these highways are to your UDOT supervisors in Monticello, Blanding and Bluff.”

“Chet Johnson, David Laws and Lee Meyers are more than willing to assist the UHP and local ranchers in saving lives and property…This has decreased the number of cow strikes dramatically.Your district supervisors have played a huge role in making this possible. They are truly on board with the State’s mission of ‘Zero Fatalities’”

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Responses to “TAG, YOU’RE NOT HIT”

  1. Great idea. I wonder if this has any effects on the cows.

  2. I don’t think the cows really care but UDOT is looking at data to try to determine if tags have reduced cow-car crash rates.

    Catherine Higgins at December 13, 2010 10:01 pm
  3. Could you tell me if this reflective cattle tag still in place? And a contact I can talk to?

    We have the same problems throughout Australia but we have not been able to get a cattle tag maker to be serious on making reflective cattle tags in mass production.

    I am working on this project on behalf of a road safety group in the north of West Australia that includes on our biggest mining companies.

    Has anyone started making these in the USA

    Look forward to hearing from you

  4. Contact UDOT Region Four at 801 435-4799

    Catherine Higgins at October 3, 2011 2:13 pm
  5. If “Zero Fatalaties” is really the State’s mission, why is not more being done to correct the current open range laws? I hit a black cow last night at approximately 1:45 a.m. and was lucky enough to escape without injury. From my understanding, if my property causes damage or harm to another individual, I am responsible for the damage caused by my property. If I own an animal that is a public nuissance and causes harm to another individual, I am responsible for the problems caused by my animal. If the Utah’s true mission is to have “Zero Fatalities, why rural ranchers not only given the liberty to negligently let their animals roam freely despite being a public nuissance and causing damage and harm to other, but also get paid when it happens?

    Derrick Dutson at April 1, 2012 4:01 am
  6. I am so sorry about your experience hitting a cow and am very glad you were not injured. UDOT’s role is to make the roads as safe as possible. However, when it comes to enforcement issues, that area of expertise belongs to the Utah Department of Public Safety, Utah Highway Patrol. Here are some resources that I hope will be helpful. See the DPS website for agency contact information. See this page about auto-livestock collisions on the Utah Department of Agriculture website.

    Catherine Higgins at April 16, 2012 3:44 pm
  7. I AM FROM SOUTH AFRICA, AND WE HAVE A HUGE PROBLEM OF CATTLE SLEEPING
    ON THE ROADS AT NIGHT, OFTEN RESULTING IN ACCIDENTS AND DEATH.
    CAN YOU HELP ME IN LOCATING A REFLECTIVE EAR TAG

  8. There are many types of tags available. I suggest doing an internet search.

    Catherine Higgins at August 10, 2012 2:17 pm
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